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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 20 (96 total).

Lu MC, Lauver CB, Dykton C, et al. Transformation of the Title V Maternal and Child Health Services Block Grant. Matern Child Health J. 2015;19(5):927-931. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Policy/Guideline (State), Policy/Guideline (National)
Intervention Description: Beginning in March 2013, we have undertaken a visioning process to transform the Block Grant with a three-pronged approach. First, we convened internal workgroups at MCHB to take a fresh look at mission, vision, and values; performance measurement; and the Block Grant guidance and application, including needs assessment and the Block Grant review. Second, we asked Dr. Donna Peterson, Dean of the College of Public Health at the University of South Florida, to reach out to thought leaders in our field, not only supporters but also critics, to advise us on how we can improve, innovate and transform the Block Grant. Third, honoring our federal-state partnership, we asked AMCHP to convene a workgroup of its Board members to partner with us in the transformation process. Based on their initial recommendations, we developed a framework for transformation, and solicited input from the broader community of State Title V programs and other MCH leaders and stakeholders including families via a series of web-based “listening sessions,” which culminated in a town hall at AMCHP’s annual conference in February 2014. We also established a web-based drop box and received hundreds of emails from the field. We reached out to individuals and organizations representing important MCH stakeholders for their input, including family representatives to assure that family voices are heard, and that families are front and center in helping drive the transformation. All these inputs helped inform the development of the draft guidance and proposed measurement framework, which underwent two rounds of public comments beginning June 2014 as part of the Office of Budget and Management (OMB) approval process. The guidance was approved by the OMB in January 2015.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: In summary, through a 21-month visioning process with input from diverse MCH stakeholders and other national, state and local MCH leaders, families and other partners, the Title V MCH Services Block Grant has been transformed. This transformation has improved the ability of States to tell a more coherent and compelling narrative about the impact of Title V, while reducing reporting burden and maintaining flexibility for the States. The ultimate success of the transformation will be measured by how much the transformed Title V program moves the needle in MCH in the States and for the Nation.
Study Design: Report
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: N/A
Sample Size: N/A
Age Range: N/A

Kann L. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2015. MMWR Surveill Summ. 2016;65. Access Abstract

Lessne D, Cidade M. Student reports of bullying and cyber-bullying: Results from the 2013 School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey. Web tables. NCES 2015- 056. 2015. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Assessment
Intervention Description: N/A
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: N/A
Study Design: report
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: NCES Crime and Safety Surveys portal, 2010–11 Common Core of Data (CCD) and the 2011–12 Private School Universe Survey (PSS)
Sample Size: N/A
Age Range: N/A

Gladden RM, Vivolo-Kantor AM, Hamburger ME, Lumpkin CD. Bullying surveillance among youths: Uniform definitions for public health and recommended data elements, version 1.0. Atlanta, GA; National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and U.S. Department of Education; 2014. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Assessment, Screening Tool Implementation Training
Intervention Description: N/A
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: N/A
Study Design: N/A
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: N/A
Sample Size: N/A
Age Range: N/A

Chisholm JF. Review of the status of cyberbullying and cyberbullying prevention. Journal of Information Systems Education. 2014;25(1):77-87. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Description: The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the current status of the research and theoretical perspectives on cyberbullying in hopes of encouraging good scholarship, improved methodologies and thoughtful inquiries to better inform educators, parents, mental health service providers, policy makers and others so that they can more effectively promote healthy online and offline behaviors among digital users.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: Continued research on the diversity among the victims of cyberbullying as well as the diversity among cyberbullies which studies how age, gender, social class, access to ICTs, and individual preferences regarding online activities of children and adolescents will increase our knowledge about the interplay of online activity and the user’s experience of being bullied and bullying(Hinduja, 2012). Preventing cyberbullying within college communities will prove to be challenging. What is known about cyberbullying stems mostly from research with children and younger adolescents. Research on cyberbullying empirical studies are needed to understand any similarities and differences between this population and younger individuals with respect to the types and forms of cyberbullying, the characteristics of the cyberbully, victim, the bystanders, as well as the impact on the campus community for this population. Results from existing studies need to be replicated and validated.
Study Design: N/A
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: N/A
Sample Size: N/A
Age Range: N/A

Klomek AB, Sourander A, Gould M. The association of suicide and bullying in childhood to young adulthood: A review of cross-sectional and longitudinal research findings. Can J Psychiatry. 2010;55(5):282. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Assessment
Intervention Description: To review the research addressing the association of suicide and bullying, from childhood to young adulthood, including cross-sectional and longitudinal research findings. Relevant publications were identified via electronic searches of PsycNet and MEDLINE without date specification, in addition to perusing the reference lists of relevant articles.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: Bullying and peer victimization constitute more than correlates of suicidality. Future research with long-term follow-up should continue to identify specific causal paths between bullying and suicide.
Study Design: N/A
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: PsycNet and MEDLINE databases as well as references lists
Sample Size: N/A
Age Range: N/A

Dobry Y, Braquehais MD, Sher L. Bullying, psychiatric pathology and suicidal behavior. Int J Adolesc Med Health. 2013;25(3):295-299. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Description: N/A
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: Nevertheless, cruelty (and bullying, as one of its manifestations) breaks the basis of morality. We, as mental health professionals, usually treat the victims of those actions unfortunately long after they have been exposed to the harm. Perpetrators of bullying generally (but not always) must bear with the sanctions society has developed to control violence, and they are often reluctant to participate in psychological interventions. In any case, the evidence does not support the idea that the majority of cruel actions are intrinsically “pathological”, in the sense of being motivated by “mental disorders”, but a human phenomenon related to the nature of our condition. Therefore, only moral rules (expressed, for instance, in educational models) and legal dispositions – but not psychiatric or psychological interventions – may dissuade humans from this form of cruelty
Study Design: N/A
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: N/A
Sample Size: N/A
Age Range: N/A

Kumpulainen K. Psychiatric conditions associated with bullying. Int J Adolesc Med Health. 2008;20(2):121-132. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Multicomponent School-Based Program
Intervention Description: N/A
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: Based on our current knowledge, school-based interventions regulating the behavior of the child, increasing pro-social skills and promoting peer relationships are recommended for those without concurrent psychiatric disturbance, but those displaying psychiatric symptoms and disorders should be referred for psychiatric consultation and intervention.
Study Design: N/A
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: N/A
Sample Size: N/A
Age Range: N/A

Kim YS, Leventhal B. Bullying and suicide. A review. Int J Adolesc Med Health. 2008;20(2):133-154. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Description: This paper provides a systematic review of the previous 37 studies conducted in children and adolescents from communities, as well as in special populations that examined the association between bullying experiences and suicide, with an emphasis on the strengths and limitations of the study designs.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: Despite methodological and other differences and limitations, it is increasingly clear that any participation in bullying increases the risk of suicidal ideations and/or behaviors in a broad spectrum of youth.
Study Design: Systematic Review
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: N/A
Sample Size: 37 studies
Age Range: Children and adolescents

Kaltiala-Heino R, Fröjd S. Correlation between bullying and clinical depression in adolescent patients. Adolesc Health Med Ther. 2011;2:37-44. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Description: N/A
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: Many studies have demonstrated a concurrent association between involvement in bullying and depression in adolescent population samples. Not only victims but also bullies display increased risk of depression, although not all studies have confirmed this for the bullies. Retrospective studies among adults support the notion that victimization is followed by depression. Prospective follow-up studies have suggested both that victimization from bullying may be a risk factor for depression and that depression may predispose adolescents to bullying. Research among clinically referred adolescents is scarce but suggests that correlations between victimization from bullying and depression are likely to be similar in clinical and population samples. Adolescents who bully present with elevated numbers of psychiatric symptoms and psychiatric and social welfare treatment contacts.
Study Design: Literature Review
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: N/A
Sample Size: N/A
Age Range: N/A

van Geel M, Goemans A, Vedder PH. The relation between peer victimization and sleeping problems: A meta-analysis. Sleep Med Rev. 2016;27:89-95. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Description: The aim of the current meta-analysis is to study the relation between peer victimization and sleeping problems.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: N/A
Study Design: Meta-analysis
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: The databases PsycINFO, MEDLINE, ERIC, Embase and LILACS
Sample Size: 21 studies with 363,539 children and adolescents
Age Range: 7 up to 19 y of age

Gini G, Pozzoli T. Bullied children and psychosomatic problems: A meta-analysis. Pediatrics. 2013;132(4):720-729. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Description: We searched online databases up to April 2012, and bibliographies of retrieved studies and of narrative reviews, for studies that examined the association between being bullied and psychosomatic complaints in children and adolescents. The original search identified 119 nonduplicated studies, of which 30 satisfied the prestated inclusion criteria.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: The association between being bullied and psychosomatic problems was confirmed. Given that school bullying is a widespread phenomenon in many countries around the world, the present results indicate that bullying should be considered a significant international public health problem.
Study Design: Meta-analysis
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: online databases up to April 2012, and bibliographies of retrieved studies and of narrative reviews
Sample Size: 30 studies
Age Range: N/A

Glew GM, Fan M, Katon W, Rivara FP, Kernic MA. Bullying, psychosocial adjustment, and academic performance in elementary school. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005;159(11):1026-1031. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Assessment
Intervention Description: To determine the prevalence of bullying during elementary school and its association with school attendance, academic achievement, disciplinary actions, and self-reported feelings of sadness, safety, and belonging.
Primary Outcomes: Self-reported involvement in bullying
Conclusion: The prevalence of frequent bullying among elementary school children is substantial. Associations between bullying involvement and school problems indicate this is a serious issue for elementary schools. The research presented herein demonstrates the need for evidence-based antibullying curricula in the elementary grades.
Study Design: Cross-sectional study using 2001-2002 school data
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Urban, West Coast public school district.
Data Source: 2001-2002 school data
Sample Size: Three thousand five hundred thirty (91.4%) third, fourth, and fifth grade students.
Age Range: third, fourth, and fifth grade students

Holt MK, Finkelhor D, Kantor GK. Multiple victimization experiences of urban elementary school students: Associations with psychosocial functioning and academic performance. Child Abuse Negl. 2007;31(5):503-515. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Assessment (patient/consumer)
Intervention Description: This study explored the victimization experiences of urban elementary school students to determine whether subsets of youth emerged with similar victimization profiles (e.g., no victimization, multiple types of victimization). It also evaluated whether multiple victimization was associated with greater psychological distress and lower academic performance.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: Findings highlight the heterogeneity of youth victimization experiences and their relations to functioning, and have implications for treatment planning among practitioners working with youth.
Study Design: N/A
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: an urban, ethnically diverse school district in the Northeast
Data Source: Self-report
Sample Size: 689
Age Range: fifth grade students

Juvonen J, Wang Y, Espinoza G. Bullying experiences and compromised academic performance across middle school grades. J Early Adolesc. 2011;31(1):152-173. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Assessment
Intervention Description: The goal of the study was to examine whether bullying experiences are associated with lower academic performance across middle school among urban students.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: The results of the study suggest that peer victimization cannot be ignored when trying to improve educational outcomes in urban middle schools.
Study Design: Longitudinal Study
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: Public Middle School
Data Source: a longitudinal study of 2,300 sixth graders
Sample Size: 2300
Age Range: sixth graders

Espelage DL, Hong JS, Rao MA, Low S. Associations between peer victimization and academic performance. Theory Pract. 2013;52(4):233-240. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Multicomponent School-Based Program
Intervention Description: This article reviews the extant literature on the links between peer victimization and academic performance and engagement among children and adolescents.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: Teachers and administrators should address peer victimization through programs and frameworks such as positive behavior intervention supports and social-emotional learning approaches. These programs decrease aggression and victimization, increase peer acceptance and social competence, and improve academic engagement and test scores.
Study Design: Literature Review
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: cross-sectional investigations and longitudinal designs
Sample Size: N/A
Age Range: Children and adolescents

Wolke D, Lereya ST. Long-term effects of bullying. Arch Dis Child. 2015;100(9):879-885. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Description: This review considers the importance of bullying as a major risk factor for poor physical and mental health and reduced adaptation to adult roles including forming lasting relationships, integrating into work and being economically independent.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: Bullying by peers has been mostly ignored by health professionals but should be considered as a significant risk factor and safeguarding issue.
Study Design: Review
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: N/A
Sample Size: N/A
Age Range: N/A

Klomek AB, Sourander A, Elonheimo H. Bullying by peers in childhood and effects on psychopathology, suicidality, and criminality in adulthood. Lancet Psychiatry. 2015;2(10):930-941. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Description: Our Series paper focuses on prospective longitudinal studies that used large, population-based, community samples analysed through quantitative methods and published between 1960 and 2015.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: Future studies need to control for additional factors (including genetic, psychosocial, and environmental) to account for the mechanisms behind the reported longitudinal associations.
Study Design: N/A
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: prospective longitudinal studies that used large, population-based, community samples analysed through quantitative methods and published between 1960 and 2015
Sample Size: N/A
Age Range: N/A

Rivara F, Le Menestrel S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Preventing Bullying Through Science, Policy, and Practice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Description: N/A
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: N/A
Study Design: N/A
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: N/A
Sample Size: N/A
Age Range: N/A

Ttofi MM, Farrington DP. Effectiveness of school-based programs to reduce bullying: A systematic and meta-analytic review. J Exp Criminol. 2011;7(1):27-56. Access Abstract

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Multicomponent School-Based Program
Intervention Description: This article presents a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of anti-bullying programs in schools. Studies were included if they evaluated the effects of an anti-bullying program by comparing an intervention group who received the program with a control group who did not. Four types of research design were included: a) randomized experiments, b) intervention-control comparisons with before-and-after measures of bullying, c) other intervention-control comparisons, and d) age-cohort designs. Both published and unpublished reports were included. All volumes of 35 journals from 1983 up to the end of May 2009 were hand-searched, as were 18 electronic databases. Reports in languages other than English were also included. A total of 622 reports concerned with bullying prevention were found, and 89 of these reports (describing 53 different program evaluations) were included in our review. Of the 53 different program evaluations, 44 provided data that permitted the calculation of an effect size for bullying or victimization
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: It is concluded that the time is ripe to mount a new program of research on the effectiveness of anti-bullying programs based on these findings.
Study Design: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: Studies were included if they evaluated the effects of an anti-bullying program by comparing an intervention group who received the program with a control group who did not. Four types of research design were included: a) randomized experiments, b) intervention-control comparisons with before-and-after measures of bullying, c) other intervention-control comparisons, and d) age-cohort designs. Both published and unpublished reports were included.
Sample Size: 89 reports
Age Range: N/A

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.