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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 20 (99 total).

Videira-Silva, A., & Fonseca, H. (2017). The effect of a physical activity consultation on body mass index z-score of overweight adolescents: results from a pediatric outpatient obesity clinic. European journal of pediatrics, 176(5), 655-660

Link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00431-017-2892-1

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation

Intervention Results:

Patients in both groups decreased their BMI z-score. The PAc has shown a higher decrease in the BMI z-score (PAc -0.12, p < 0.0001; STc -0.05, p < 0.0001). The WC of the PAc group has increased 2.2 cm less than the one of the STc group (p < 0.005). The difference in waist-to-height ratio between the PAc and STc groups was of 0.015 (p < 0.005), showing a trend to decrease in the PAc group (-0.005, p = 172).

Nordbø, E. C. A., Nordh, H., Raanaas, R. K., & Aamodt, G. (2019). Promoting activity participation and well-being among children and adolescents: a systematic review of neighborhood built-environment determinants. JBI database of systematic reviews and implementation reports.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31895211

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): COMMUNITY, Other (Communities)

Intervention Results:

The evidence suggests that a composite determinant of facilities and amenities is related to more unspecified physical activity. Furthermore, less traffic exposure and more safety features, pedestrian infrastructure for walking and cycling, shorter distances to facilities and greater walkability supported active travel behavior.

Adab P, Pallan MJ, Lancashire ER, Hemming K, Frew E, Barrett T, Bhopal R, Cade JE, Canaway A, Clarke JL, Daley A, Deeks JJ, Duda JL, Ekelund U, Gill P, Griffin T, McGee E, Hurley K, Martin J, Parry J, Passmore S, Cheng KK. Effectiveness of a childhood obesity prevention programme delivered through schools, targeting 6 and 7 year olds: cluster randomised controlled trial (WAVES study). British Medical Journal. 2018 Feb 7;360:k211.

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29437667/

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Comprehensive School-Based PA Program, CLASSROOM_SCHOOL, Multicomponent School-Based Program

Intervention Results:

There was no statistically significant difference between groups for BMI score or other anthropometric, dietary, physical activity, or psychological measurements (including assessment of harm).

Alhassan S, Nwaokelemeh O, Greever CJ, Burkart S, Ahmadi M, St Laurent CW, Barr-Anderson DJ. Effect of a culturally-tailored mother-daughter physical activity intervention on pre-adolescent African-American girls' physical activity levels. Preventive Medicine Reports. 2018 May 9;11:7-14.

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30065909/

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Extra-Curricular Activities, CLASSROOM_SCHOOL

Intervention Results:

The intervention led to a significant improvement in the rate of change in the percent time that girls in the treatment groups spent in VPA and MVPA during the after school hours, respectively. No significant between group rates of change differences were observed in daughters’ total daily PA. However, significant changes were observed in the mothers’ total PA data.

Annesi JJ. Effects of a standardized curriculum on physical activity and body composition in after-school program participants with BMI scores above the 90th percentile: assessing theory-based predictors. Psychosocial Intervention. 2019;28(2):83-90.

Link: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/330424682_Effects_of_a_Standardized_Curriculum_on_Physical_Activity_and_Body_Composition_in_After-School_Program_Participants_with_BMI_Scores_above_the_90th_Percentile_Assessing_Theory-based_Predictors

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Extra-Curricular Activities, Comprehensive School-Based PA Program, CLASSROOM_SCHOOL, Multicomponent School-Based Program

Intervention Results:

For changes over 9 months in BMI, effects sizes (Cohen’s d) were .68, .40, and .07 in the 4-day (n = 70), 3-day (n = 70), and unstructured (n = 50) groups, respectively. Similar patterns of effects were found for changes in free-time physical activity and cardiovascular endurance. Incorporating a theory-based prediction model previously supported in teens through older adults, with and without medical disorders and health-risk factors, improvements in exercise-related self-regulation and self-efficacy, and mood, significantly predicted increased free-time physical activity (R2 = .48). Effects significantly strengthened to R2 = .62 when completion/non-completion of the recommended 300 min/week of physical activity was also accounted for.

Atalla M, Pinto AJ, Mielke GI, Baciuk EP, Benatti FB, & Gualano B. (2018). Tackling youth inactivity and sedentary behavior in an entire Latin America City. Frontiers in Pediatrics. 2018;6:298.

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30370264/

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Comprehensive School-Based PA Program, CLASSROOM_SCHOOL, Multicomponent School-Based Program

Intervention Results:

Physical activity did not change, although a physically inactive sub-group increased physical activity levels. Weekday television and video game time decreased, whereas computer time increased. Participants with overweight and obesity decreased BMI z-score. The intervention was not able to change the proportion of physical inactivity and sedentary behavior in youth at a city level.

Barr-Anderson DJ, Cook B, Loth K, Neumark-Sztainer D. Physical activity and sociodemographic correlates of adolescent exergamers. Journal of Adolescent Health. 2018 May;62(5):630-632.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5935126/

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Electronic PA, PARENT_FAMILY

Intervention Results:

Both male and female exergamers tended to be younger and black compared with nonexergamers. There were no significant differences in PA between exergamers than nonexergamers, except for female exergamers who engaged in more vigorous PA than female non-exergamers per week.

Bartelink NHM, van Assema P, Kremers SPJ, Savelberg HHCM, Oosterhoff M, Willeboordse M, van Schayck OCP, Winkens B, Jansen MWJ. One-and two-year effects of the healthy primary School of the Future on Children’s dietary and physical activity Behaviours: a quasi-experimental study. Nutrients. 2019 Mar;11(3):689

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30909515/

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Comprehensive School-Based PA Program, CLASSROOM_SCHOOL

Intervention Results:

Significant differences were found for reduction in sedentary behaviors and increased light PA in the intervention group. Time spent in MVPA in or out of school did not differ significantly between the control and intervention groups but the time spent in MVPA in the intervention groups was higher. Children in the intervention group increased their intake of fruits, vegetables (at home and school), dairy (school) and water consumption.

Bartholomew JB, Jowers EM, Roberts G, Fall AM, Errisuriz VL, Vaughn S. Active learning increases children's physical activity across demographic subgroups. Translational Journal of the American College of Sports Medicine. 2018;3(1):1-9.

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29774241/

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Physically Active Classrooms, CLASSROOM_SCHOOL

Intervention Results:

Students in intervention school took more steps then students in the control school by an average of about 2,645 more steps weekly. Further, students engaged more time in MVPA during the intervention programming compared to control schools. Students in intervention schools spent less sedentary time.

Beemer LR, Ajibewa TA, DellaVecchia G, Hasson RE. A pilot intervention using gamification to enhance student participation in classroom activity breaks. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019;16(21):4082.

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31652885/

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, Physically Active Classrooms, CLASSROOM_SCHOOL

Intervention Results:

There was a 23.7% increase in student engagement of in MVPA during gamification break intervention compared to the standard breaks. 55% of students accumulated about 20 minutes of MVPA during the school day with the gamification breaks compared to 25% during the standard breaks.

Belton S, McCarren A, McGrane B, Powell D, Issartel J. The Youth-Physical Activity Towards Health (Y-PATH) intervention: Results of a 24 month cluster randomised controlled trial. PLOS One. 2019;14(9):e0221684.

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31518355/

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Comprehensive School-Based PA Program, CLASSROOM_SCHOOL

Intervention Results:

This intervention targeted adolescents over a two-year period, noting a frequent decline in MVPA as children get older and aiming to combat this decline and keep MVPA consistent. The average daily MVPA for males dropped by 5.79 minutes and for females 10.33 over a 2-year period. However, after 2 years, the intervention was effective at keeping MVPA levels consistent. In both control groups, MVPA significantly decreased over a 2-year period.

Brown B, Harris KJ, Heil D, Tryon M, Cooksley A, Semmens E, Davis J, Gandhi K. Feasibility and outcomes of an out-of-school and home-based obesity prevention pilot study for rural children on an American Indian reservation. Pilot and Feasibility Studies 2018; 4:129.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6062940/

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Training (Parent/Family), Extra-Curricular Activities, PARENT_FAMILY, CLASSROOM_SCHOOL, Family-Based Interventions

Intervention Results:

Minutes of MVPA were significantly greater in intervention group compared to control group. Intervention group had 9 minutes more MVPA during 40-min period compared to baseline.

Calella P, Mancusi C, Pecoraro P, Sensi S, Sorrentino C, Imoletti M, Franzese A, Gallè F, Liguori G, Valerio G. Classroom active breaks: a feasibility study in Southern Italy. Health Promotion International. 2020;35(2):373–380.

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31011751/

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM_SCHOOL, Physically Active Classrooms

Intervention Results:

Classroom activity breaks (CABs) showed an overall potential positive effect on the reduction of inactivity of 12 min and an equivalent increase in PA levels, of which 5 min were of moderate/vigorous intensity. Girls showed lower time spent in light and moderate PA and higher amount of inactivity than boys and responded better to the intervention. The satisfaction of children and teachers was high.

Calvert HG, Mahar MT, Flay B, Turner L. Classroom-based physical activity: Minimizing disparities in school-day physical activity among elementary school students. Journal of Physical Activity and Health. 2018;15(3):161-168.

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28872390/

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM_SCHOOL, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, Physically Active Classrooms

Intervention Results:

PE, recess, and CBPA contributed significantly to students’ daily steps. Males accrued more steps than females over the school day, during PE, and during recess. No gender disparity was seen in the amount of additional steps accrued during CBPA. Overall step counts were lower among fifth-grade students versus first-grade students, but CBPA attenuated this difference such that grade-level differences were not significant in fifth-grade students who received CBPA.

Carlin A, Murphy MH, Nevill A, Gallagher AM. Effects of a peer-led Walking In ScHools intervention (the WISH study) on physical activity levels of adolescent girls: A cluster randomised pilot study. Trials. 2018 Jan 11;19(1):31.

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29325578/

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM_SCHOOL, Peer-led Curricular Activities/Training, Extra-Curricular Activities

Intervention Results:

Light intensity physical activity increased (by 8 minutes per day) for the students in the intervention schools compared to the control schools and reduction in sedentary time. No differences for MVPA were seen between the intervention and control groups. However, these intervention effects were not seen at the 4 month follow up. None of the other measures showed any changes due to the intervention.

Chesham RA, Booth JN, Sweeney EL, Ryde GC, Gorely T, Brooks NE, Moran CN. The Daily Mile makes primary school children more active, less sedentary and improves their fitness and body composition: a quasi-experimental pilot study. BMC Medicine. 2018 May 10;16(1):64.

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29743076/

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM_SCHOOL, Physically Active Classrooms

Intervention Results:

MVPA increased by 9.1 minutes (95% confidence) for intervention school. Sedentary time decreased by 18.2 minutes (SMD=0.407, p=0.017).

Corepal R, Best P, O’Neill RF, Kee F, Badham J, Dunne L, Miller S, Connolly P, Cupples M, Sluijs EV, Tully M, Hunter RF. A feasibility study of ‘The StepSmart Challenge’ to promote physical activity in adolescents.” Pilot and Feasibility Studies. 2019 Nov 17;5:132.

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31832227/

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM_SCHOOL, PE Enhancements

Intervention Results:

Of the 236 pupils invited, 224 participated (94.9%): 84.8% (190/224) provided valid MVPA (minutes/day) at baseline and 57.2% (123/215) at 52 weeks. Our findings suggest that The StepSmart Challenge, a gamified physical activity intervention, is acceptable to adolescents aged 12–14 years. Recruitment and retention rates of schools and participants indicate that it is feasible to scale up the intervention for an effectiveness trial. However, The StepSmart Challenge would benefit from the refinement of the website used and participant workbooks.

Cronholm F, Rosengren BE, Karlsson C, Karlsson MK. A comparative study found that a seven-year school-based exercise programme increased physical activity levels in both sexes. Acta Paediatrica. 2018 Apr;107(4):701-707.

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29194764/

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM_SCHOOL, PE Enhancements

Intervention Results:

Physical activity and screen-time activity were similar between the two groups before the study started. The intervention group then achieved higher durations of total physical activity than the controls (p < 0.001) and these levels remained in the sex-specific evaluations. There were no differences between the groups in the durations of leisure-time activity (p 0.08–0.77) or screen-time activity (p 0.31–0.91).

D'Egidio V, Lia L, Sinopoli A, Backhaus I, Mannocci A, Saulle R, Sestili C, Cocchiara R, Di Bella O, Yordanov T, Mazzacane M, La Torre G. Results of the Italian project 'GiochiAMO' to improve nutrition and PA among children. Journal of Public Health. 2019 Nov 30:fdz129.

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31786612/

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM_SCHOOL, Comprehensive School-Based PA Program, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Physically Active Classrooms, Multicomponent School-Based Program

Intervention Results:

Behavior score was 27.4 (SD: 9.6) before physical activity intervention and 30.5 (SD: 10.7) after it. A total of 35 (70%) improved their PA behavior while 45 (59%) positively changed their behavior about correct nutrition.

Duncan S, Stewart T, McPhee J, Borotkanics R, Prendergast K, Zinn C, Meredith-Jones K, Taylor R, McLachlan C, Schofield G. Efficacy of a compulsory homework programme for increasing physical activity and improving nutrition in children: a cluster randomised controlled trial. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. 2019;16(1):80.

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31488140/

NPM: 8: Physical Activity
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM_SCHOOL, Homework/Extra Credit, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training

Intervention Results:

Statistically significant differences were seen in the intervention groups for weekday physical activity at home, weekend physical activity, BMI (at follow up only for children with higher BMI at baseline), and improved fruit consumption. The biggest at home weekday increases were seen in children in schools in lower socioeconomic areas. No differences were found between the intervention and control groups for in school physical activity, sedentary time, waist-to-height ratio, or other dietary patterns.
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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.