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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 20 (26 total).

Cross, D., Monks, H., Hall, M., Shaw, T., Pintabona, Y., Erceg, E., et al. (2011). Three year results of the Friendly Schools whole-of-school intervention on children's bullying behavior. British Educational Research Journal, 37, 105–129.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01411920903420024

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, Bullying Committee, PARENT/FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Education/Training (caregiver), School Rules

Intervention Results:

Results indicate that intervention students were significantly less likely to observe bullying at 12, 24 and 36 months and be bullied after 12 and 36 months, and significantly more likely to tell if bullied after 12 months than comparison students. No differences were found for self‐reported perpetration of bullying.

Krueger, L. M. (2010). The implementation of an anti-bullying program to reduce bullying behaviors on elementary school buses. (Doctoral dissertation, Available from the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses database.)

Link: https://search.proquest.com/openview/f46dd8b9303afffbe699e2e215aeccd7/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=18750&diss=y

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Online Material/Education/Blogging

Intervention Results:

Pretest and posttest data indicated a significant decrease in bullying behaviors for both the control and treatment groups, with the experimental group exhibiting a greater reduction in bullying behaviors than the control group. The results instead seem to show that the anti-bullying intervention had a spillover effect, producing successful reductions in bullying behaviors over time for both groups, though clearly considerably more so for the group that received the intervention than for the control group.

Sapouna, M., Wolke, D., Vannini, N., Watson, S., Woods, S., Schneider, W., et al. (2010). Virtual learning intervention to reduce bullying victimization in primary school: A controlled trial. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 51(1), 104–112.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19703096

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), PATIENT/CONSUMER, Online Material/Education/Blogging

Intervention Results:

In the combined sample, baseline victims in the intervention group were more likely to escape victimization at the first follow-up compared with baseline victims in the control group (adjusted RR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.02-1.81). A dose-response relationship between the amount of active interaction with the virtual victims and escaping victimization was found (adjusted OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.003-1.18). Subsample analyses found a significant effect on escaping victimization only to hold for UK children (adjusted RR, 1.90; CI, 1.23-2.57). UK children in the intervention group experienced decreased victimization rates at the first follow-up compared with controls, even after adjusting for baseline victimization, gender and age (adjusted RR, .60; 95% CI, .36-.93).

Collard DCM, Chinapaw MJM, Verhagen E, Bakker I, Mechelen W. (2010). Effectiveness of a school-based physical activity-related injury prevention program on risk behavior and neuromotor fitness a cluster randomized controlled trial. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity 2010;28:7–9.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2835649/

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, SCHOOL, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media)

Intervention Results:

The iPlay-program was not able to significantly improve injury-preventing behavior. The program did significantly improve knowledge and attitude, two determinants of behavior. The effect of the intervention-program on behavior appeared to be significantly mediated by knowledge and attitude. Improved scores on attitude, social norm, self-efficacy and intention were significantly related to changes in injury preventing behavior. Furthermore, iPlay resulted in small non-significant improvements in neuromotor fitness in favor of the intervention group.

Collard DCM, Verhagen EALM, Chinapaw MJM et al. (2010b). Effectiveness of a school-based physical activity injury prevention program: a cluster randomized controlled trial. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2010; 164:145-150.

Link: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/382761

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media)

Intervention Results:

A total of 100 injuries in the intervention group and 104 injuries in the control group were registered. Nonresponse at baseline or follow-up was minimal (8.7%). The Cox regression analyses adjusted for clustering showed a small nonsignificant intervention effect on total (HR, 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41-1.59), sports club (0.69; 0.28-1.68), and leisure time injuries (0.75; 0.36-1.55). However, physical activity appeared to be an effect modifier. In those who were less physically active, the intervention had a larger effect. The intervention reduced the total and leisure time injury incidence (HR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.21-1.06; and 0.43; 0.16-1.14; respectively). Sports club injury incidence was significantly reduced (HR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.07-0.75).

Banfield JM, Gomez M, Kiss A, et al. Effectiveness of the PARTY (prevent alcohol and risk-related trauma in youth) program preventing traumatic injuries: a 10-year analysis. J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2011;70: 732-5.

Link: https://www.islandhealth.ca/sites/default/files/2018-06/effectiveness-of-party-2011.pdf

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training

Intervention Results:

Of 3,905 P.A.R.T.Y. participants, 1,281 were successfully randomly matched on the above 4 variables with 1,281 controls. The most frequent injury was injury by other or homicide 373 of 2,562 (14.8%). There were fewer traumatic injuries in the STUDY group than in the CONTROL group (43.3% vs. 47.4%; p 0.02; OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.03–1.45). This difference was stronger in females (44.4% vs. 49.0%; p 0.04) and before the graduating driver licensing system implementation (60.1% vs. 67.2%; p 0.04).

Marks E. A drugs and alcohol awareness programme developed, with 12-13 year olds, by the South Western Ambulance Service. Education and Health 2010;28(3): 42–45.

Link: http://sheu.org.uk/sheux/EH/eh283em.pdf

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Assessment, CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom)

Intervention Results:

The survey results came from a small group (total n=45). Although 85% of the students agreed that "they are in charge of their own health" one third of these students felt that they were under pressure from peers or friends to smoke/drink/take drugs or risk losing that friendship. This suggests that perhaps the skills we gave them to cope with certain situations were not relevant to these students, or were not practiced enough for them to feel confident in using them. 75% of the pupils agreed that "some people develop mental illness when they take drugs often", however, over half of the students thought it would never happen to them. There is room for improvement in the programme to question and provide an opportunity to change ways of thinking. It was notable that nearly half of the students recognise alcohol as being a dangerous drug that is linked to deaths of young people in this country, and 40% of these students stated they don't drink and don't plan on starting. This is encouraging since, if 40% of our group have not yet tried alcohol, hopefully we have introduced the programme at an early stage in their lives and help prevent them drinking. There was a statistical significance in the differences pre- and post-test for the response of ringing 999 and also responses to the actions they would take and why. This suggests a positive effect of the programme. The results also suggest that these youngsters have a rather patchy understanding of the risks and effects of different sorts of drugs eg. 20% thought that drugs make you feel more awake, including alcohol. McIntosh et al (2003), suggest that pre-teens had a very limited, vague and often erroneous knowledge of illegal drugs.

Will KE, Sabo CS. Reinforcing Alcohol Prevention (RAP) Program: a secondary school curriculum to combat underage drinking and impaired driving. Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education 2010;54(1): 14–36.

Link: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2010-10623-003

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom)

Intervention Results:

RAP Program modules were delivered to 1,720 8th, 9th, and 10th graders at four schools during health courses. Dependent T-tests on a pre-post alcohol-related knowledge survey administered to a subset of classes (N = 668) indicated that students' knowledge and awareness of alcohol-related risks and consequences increased significantly from pretest (M = 84.96, SD = 8.87) to posttest (M = 97.25, SD = 12.39).

Copeland AL, Williamson DA, Kendzor DA, Bisinelle MS, Rash CJ, Kulesza M, et al. A school based alcohol, tobacco, and drug prevention program for children: the Wise Mind study. Cognitive Therapy and Research 2010;34: 522–32.

Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10608-009-9263-9

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media), School Rules, Assembly, Teacher/Staff Training, CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide)

Intervention Results:

At an 18-month assessment, the ATD program resulted in healthier alcohol and tobacco expectancies as compared to the HEE program. Children in the ATD program did not differ from those in the HEE program in alcohol, tobacco, or drug use prevalence. However, prevalence rates of use were very low across all schools.

Norman CD, Maley O, Li X, Skinner HA. Using the internet to assist smoking prevention and cessation in schools: a randomized, controlled trial. Health Psychol 2008;27: 799–810.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19025276

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), PATIENT/CONSUMER, Online Material/Education/Blogging

Intervention Results:

The integrated Smoking Zine program helped smokers significantly reduce the likelihood of having high intentions to smoke and increased their likelihood of high resistance to continued cigarette use at 6 months. The intervention also significantly reduced the likelihood of heavy cigarette use adoption by nonsmokers during the study period.

Prokhorov AV, Kelder SH, Shegog R, et al. Impact of a smoking prevention interactive experience (ASPIRE), an interactive, multimedia smoking prevention and cessation curriculum for culturally diverse high-school students. Nicotine Tob Res 2008;10: 1477–85.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19023839

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Online Material/Education/Blogging, CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), YOUTH, Assessment, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, Educational Material

Intervention Results:

At 18-month follow-up, among baseline nonsmokers, smoking initiation rates were significantly lower in the ASPIRE condition (1.9% vs. 5.8%, p < .05). Students receiving ASPIRE also demonstrated significantly higher decisional balance against smoking and decreased temptations to smoke. Differences between groups in self-efficacy and resistance skills were not significant. There was a nonsignificant trend toward improved smoking cessation with ASPIRE, but low recruitment of smokers precluded conclusions with respect to cessation.

Battey, G. J. L. (2009). Can bullies become buddies? Evaluation of and theoretical support for an experimental education bully prevention curriculum with seventh grade students. (Doctoral dissertation, Available from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. (UMI No. 3348633)).

Link: https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/7d278w86k

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), SCHOOL, Extra-Curricular Activities

Intervention Results:

Results showed victimization was present at both schools, although at a low to moderate level; the data did not provide a good fit with Harter’s model of self-worth; the BPCCC was effective in changing only the knowledge base of bully behavior; and the students and staff involved found many benefits of the program including increased perceived social support, improved feelings of self-worth, and the creation of a common language and references to use between students and adults when talking about expected behaviors.

Fonagy, P., Twemlow, S.W., Vernberg, E.M., Nelson, J.M., Dill, E.J., Little, T.D., & Sargent, J.A. (2009). A cluster randomized controlled trial of child-focused psychiatric consultation and a school systems-focused intervention to reduce aggression. Child Psychology and Psychiatry, online first.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19207633

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling

Intervention Results:

CAPSLE moderated the developmental trend of increasing peer-reported victimization (p < .01), aggression (p < .05), self-reported aggression (p < .05) and aggressive bystanding (p < .05), compared to TAU schools. CAPSLE also moderated a decline in empathy and an increase in the percent of children victimized compared to SPC (p < .01) and TAU conditions (p < .01). Results for self-reported victimization, helpful bystanding, and beliefs in the legitimacy of aggression did not suggest significantly different changes among the study conditions over time. CAPSLE produced a significant decrease in off-task (p < .001) and disruptive classroom behaviors (p < .01), while behavioral change was not observed in SPC and TAU schools. Superiority with respect to TAU for victimization (p < .05), aggression (p < .01), and helpful (p < .05) and aggressive bystanding (p < .01) were maintained in the follow-up year.

Hoglund,W. L., Hosan, N. E., & Leadbeater, B. J. (2012). Using your WITS: A 6-year follow up of a peer victimization prevention program. School Psychology Review, 41(2), 193–214.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02796015.2012.12087520

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training

Intervention Results:

There were significant and meaningful effects of the WITS Primary Program on linear changes in physical victimization (Cohen's d = .17), relational victimization (Cohen's d = .20), and social competence (Cohen's d = .20); significant and small effects on physical aggression (Cohen's d = .09); and nonsignificant effects for help seeking and internalizing (Cohen's d values = .04 and .10, respectively) during elementary school. Following the transition into middle school, the program effects faded, with the exception of some subgroups in high-risk contexts.

Cross AB, Gottfredson DC, Wilson DM, Rorie M, Connell N. Implementation quality and positive experiences in after-school programs. Am J Community Psychol 2010;45:370–80. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10464-010-9295-z.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20229226

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training

Intervention Results:

The study illustrates how multiple dimensions of program implementation can be measured, and shows that some but not all dimensions of implementation are related to the quality of student after-school experiences.

Addison, W. B. (2015). Embedding Sexual Assault Bystander Awareness Education in a Criminal Justice Course. (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations Publishing.

Link: https://search.proquest.com/docview/1751029274?pq-origsite=gscholar

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom)

Intervention Results:

The outcome of this study indicated that students who participated in sexual assault bystander awareness education had a significant increase in posttest scores for the ability to identify risks, confidence to react, and confidence to intervene in sexual assault situations in comparison to control group posttest scores. According to the data, there were no significant pre- and posttest differences between gender, age, and race subgroups.

Bradley 2009 AR, Yeater EA, O’Donohue W. An evaluation of a mixed-gender sexual assault prevention program. Journal of Primary Prevention 2009;30(6):697–715.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19937385

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Peer-led Curricular Activities/Training, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom)

Intervention Results:

The prevention program was effective at increasing men's victim empathy and decreasing their adherence to rape myths but ineffective at changing women's assault-related knowledge, participation in risky dating behaviors, and sexual communication strategies.

Coker, A. L., Bush, H. M., Cook-Craig, P. G., DeGue, S., Clear, E. R., Brancato, C. J., Fisher, B. S., Recktenwald, E. A., & Davenport, M. (2017). Randomized controlled trial testing bystander effectiveness to reduce violence. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 52 (5), 566-578.

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0749379717300272

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Assembly, CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, Peer-led Curricular Activities/Training, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Community-Based Group Education

Intervention Results:

A total of 89,707 students completed surveys. The primary, as randomized, analyses conducted in 2014–2016 included linear mixed models and generalized estimating equations to examine the condition−time interaction on violence outcomes. Slopes of school-level totals of sexual violence perpetration (condition−time, p<0.001) and victimization (condition−time, p<0.001) were different over time. During Years 3–4, when Green Dot was fully implemented, the mean number of sexual violent events prevented by the intervention was 120 in Intervention Year 3 and 88 in Year 4. For Year 3, prevalence rate ratios for sexual violence perpetration in the intervention relative to control schools were 0.83 (95% CI=0.70, 0.99) in Year 3 and 0.79 (95% CI=0.67, 0.94) in Year 4. Similar patterns were observed for sexual violence victimization, sexual harassment, stalking, and dating violence perpetration and victimization.

Darlington, E. M. Decreasing misperceptions of sexual violence to increase bystander intervention: A social norms intervention. (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from University of Oregon Libraries.

Link: https://scholarsbank.uoregon.edu/xmlui/handle/1794/18489

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Peer-led Curricular Activities/Training, YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), PATIENT/CONSUMER, Community-Based Group Education

Intervention Results:

There was evidence that both interventions, when analyzed together and compared to the control group, were effective at decreasing rape myth acceptance. When analyzed separately, both SWAT and SWAT plus were effective at increasing the number of helpful bystander behaviors participants could list and increasing bystander self-efficacy. The SWAT plus intervention appeared to be more effective at increasing actual bystander intervention behavior. The SWAT intervention appeared to be more effective at increasing intention to help. There were also mixed results for the effectiveness at posttest and follow-up.

Hillenbrand-Gunn, T. L., Heppner, M. J., Mauch, P. A., & Park, H. (2010). Men as allies: The efficacy of a high school rape prevention intervention. Journal of Counseling & Development, 88(1), 43-51.

Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/j.1556-6678.2010.tb00149.x

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Online Material/Education/Blogging

Intervention Results:

As hypothesized at posttest, the male and female experimental groups demonstrated a significant decrease in rape-supportive attitudes, which was maintained at follow-up. Male participants viewed peers' attitudes toward sexual violence as significantly different (worse) from peers' pretest self-ratings; after intervention, male and female experimental group participants' peer ratings were significantly more accurate.
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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.