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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 16 (16 total).

Brown, E. C., Low, S., Smith, B. H., & Haggerty, K. P. (2011). Outcomes from a school randomized controlled trial of steps to respect: A bullying prevention program. School Psychology Review, 40(3), 423–443.

Link: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2011-25041-006

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, Reporting & Response System, YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling

Intervention Results:

Multilevel analyses indicated significant (p < .05) positive effects of the program on a range of outcomes (e.g., improved student climate, lower levels of physical bullying perpetration, less school bullying- related problems). Results of this study support the program as an efficacious intervention for the prevention of bullying in schools.

Houlston C and Smith PK (2009) The impact of a peer counseling scheme to address bullying in an all-girl London secondary school: A short-term longitudinal study. British Journal of Educational Psychology 79(1): 69–86

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18435867

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Peer Counselor

Intervention Results:

Peer counsellors benefited from their involvement through an acquisition of transferable communication and interpersonal skills, and, compared to age-matched control pupils, had increased social self-esteem. There were no reductions in self-reported bullying and victimization, but in general pupils believed that there was less bullying in school and that the school was doing more about bullying, with year 7 students showing the most positive changes.

Elledge, L. C., Cavell, T. A., Ogle, N. T., & Newgent, R. A. (2010). School-based mentoring as selective prevention for bullied children: A preliminary test. Journal of Primary Prevention, 31, 171–187.

Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10935-010-0215-7

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling

Intervention Results:

Results indicated that compared to Different control children, Lunch Buddy children experienced significantly greater reductions in peer reports of peer victimization from fall to spring semesters. Lunch Buddy children and mentors viewed the relationship as positive, and parents and teachers were very satisfied with Lunch Buddy mentoring.

Fonagy, P., Twemlow, S.W., Vernberg, E.M., Nelson, J.M., Dill, E.J., Little, T.D., & Sargent, J.A. (2009). A cluster randomized controlled trial of child-focused psychiatric consultation and a school systems-focused intervention to reduce aggression. Child Psychology and Psychiatry, online first.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19207633

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling

Intervention Results:

CAPSLE moderated the developmental trend of increasing peer-reported victimization (p < .01), aggression (p < .05), self-reported aggression (p < .05) and aggressive bystanding (p < .05), compared to TAU schools. CAPSLE also moderated a decline in empathy and an increase in the percent of children victimized compared to SPC (p < .01) and TAU conditions (p < .01). Results for self-reported victimization, helpful bystanding, and beliefs in the legitimacy of aggression did not suggest significantly different changes among the study conditions over time. CAPSLE produced a significant decrease in off-task (p < .001) and disruptive classroom behaviors (p < .01), while behavioral change was not observed in SPC and TAU schools. Superiority with respect to TAU for victimization (p < .05), aggression (p < .01), and helpful (p < .05) and aggressive bystanding (p < .01) were maintained in the follow-up year.

Bernstein, L., Rappaport, C., Olsho, L., Hunt, D.& Levin, M. (2009) Impact evaluation of the US Department of Education's student mentoring program. National Center for educational evaulation and regional assistance.

Link: https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED504310.pdf

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Peer Counselor

Intervention Results:

We estimated a total of 17 impacts in three domains: (1) academic achievement and engagement; (2) interpersonal relationships and personal responsibility; and (3) high-risk or delinquent behavior. • The Student Mentoring Program did not lead to statistically significant impacts on students in any of the three outcome domains. The estimated impact on the Student Mentoring Program on the outcome measures for all three domains is reported in Exhibit ES.1. • Three of the impacts were statistically significant before accounting for multiple comparisons. However, after accounting for multiple comparisons within each of the three domains, these three impact estimates were no longer statistically significant. The Student Mentoring Program improved academic outcomes for girls and produced mixed academic outcomes for boys. There were several positive impacts of the program for girls. The impact on self-reported scholastic efficacy and school bonding was positive and statistically significant for girls, with treatment group girls scoring higher than control group girls. In addition, there was a statistically significant difference in impacts on the scholastic efficacy and school bonding measure by gender (effect size for girls = 0.18 versus -0.05 for boys). There was also a positive, statistically significant effect on future orientation for boys (effect size = 0.17). However, the difference in impacts between boys and girls on this measure was not statistically significant. • For boys, the Student Mentoring Program negatively affected self-reported prosocial behavior Boys who were assigned to mentoring reported statistically significant lower scores on the pro-social behaviors scale compared to their control group peers. Moreover, there was a statistically significant difference in impacts on the pro-social behaviors scale by gender (effect size for girls = 0.08 versus – 0.11 for boys). . • The Student Mentoring Program led to a decrease in truancy for younger students. Truancy (i.e., unexcused absence) showed a statistically significant improvement for younger students (below age 12) who were assigned to mentoring compared to same age peers in the control group (effect size = -0.23). However, the difference in impacts on truancy between younger and older students (aged 12 and older) was not statistically significant after accounting for multiple comparisons

Bulanda JJ, McCrea KT. The promise of an accumulation of care: disadvantaged African-American youths’ perspectives about what makes an after school program meaningful. Child Adolesc Social Work J 2013;30:95–118.

Link: https://ecommons.luc.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1015&context=socialwork_facpubs

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling

Intervention Results:

Participation and retention of youth in SUHO were higher than national averages; youth reported SUHO made it possible for them to have better relationships as friends, romantic partners and in academic settings and they look forward to being better parents. Youth developed positive peer relationships and youth actively sought out relationships with care adults.

Clarke, L. (2009) Effects of a school-based adult mentoring intervention on low income, urban high school freshman judged to be at risk for drop out: a replication and extension. PhD Dissertation, The State University of New Jersey, United States--New Jersey.

Link: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/26131/

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling

Intervention Results:

As expected from Holt et al., in comparison to the control group, the youth who were assigned mentors reported significantly more positive perceptions of teacher support and received fewer discipline referrals. By the end of this study’s extended follow-up period, mentored students also reported significantly greater sense of classmate acceptance and had higher grades in mathematics and language arts than the control group.

Converse, N. & Lignugaris/Kraft, B. (2009) Evaluation of a school-based mentoring program for at-risk middle school youth. Remedial and special education, 30.

Link:

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling

Intervention Results:

Students who participated in the mentoring program had statistically significant reductions in office referrals and statistically significant improvements in school attitude. Based on an analysis of mentor interview responses and log entries, mentors were divided into “viewed positively” mentors and “questioned-impact” mentors. Viewed positively mentors reported fewer office referrals, met more consistently with mentees, reported more relaxed mentoring sessions, and shared food and played games more often with their mentees than “questioned-impact” mentors.he mentoring program had statistically significant reductions in office referrals. There were no significant difference between groups for unexcused absences.

Grant, C (2010). Grounded in your culture: the hidden key to promoting academic achievement among african american adolescent males. PhD Dissertation Capella University, United States – Minneapolis.

Link: https://search.proquest.com/docview/288455341

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Group Education, Community-Based Group Education

Intervention Results:

This quantitative experimental design study examined the cause and effect relationship between a culturally grounded intervention and academic achievement by exposing one group to a mentoring intervention and the other to a tutorting program. Participants in this research were from an alternative school. The findings of this study have implications for educators working ot enhance the academic achievement of male African Americans.

Karcher, M. (2008) The study of mentoring in the learning environment (SMILE): A randomized evaluation of the effectiveness of school-based mentoring. Prevention Science, 9, 99-113.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18297400

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation

Intervention Results:

Three-way cross-level interactions of sex and school level (elementary, middle, and high school) revealed that elementary school boys and high school girls benefited the most from mentoring. Among elementary school boys, those in the mentoring condition reported higher social skills (empathy and cooperation), hopefulness, and connectedness both to school and to culturally different peers. Among high school girls, those mentored reported greater connectedness to culturally different peers, self-esteem, and support from friends. Findings suggest no or iatrogenic effects of mentoring for older boys and younger girls.

Katz, J., Heisterkamp, H. A., & Fleming, W. M. (2011). The social justice roots of the mentors in violence prevention model and its application in a high school setting. Violence Against Women, 17, 684–702. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1077801211409725.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1077801211409725

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, Assessment, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling

Intervention Results:

Findings reveal students exposed to the MVP model are more likely to see forms of violence as being wrong and are more likely to take actions to intervene than students not exposed to the program. Findings support the premises on which MVP is founded.

Kuperminc GP, Thomason J, DiMeo M, Broomfield-Massey K. Cool Girls, Inc.: promoting the positive development of urban preadolescent and early adolescent girls. J Prim Prev 2011;32:171–83. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10935-011-0243-y.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21800162

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Extra-Curricular Activities, YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling

Intervention Results:

Relative to comparisons, program participants experienced gains in scholastic competence, hope for the future, and physical activity. Cool Girls participants with a mentor experienced significant gains in social acceptance and body image relative to other Cool Girls and were more than four times as likely to have expectations of avoiding drug use in the future.

Schwartz SEO, Rhodes JE, Spencer R, Grossman JB. Youth initiated mentoring: investigating a new approach to working with vulnerable adolescents. Am J Community Psychol 2013;52:155–69.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23780477

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling, Assessment, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Other Education

Intervention Results:

Results indicated that more enduring mentoring relationships were associated with increased retention of educational, vocational, and behavioral outcomes 3 years following entry into the study. Qualitative data suggested that, when relationships endured, mentors contributed to improvements in participants' educational and occupational success, quality of relationships with parents, peers, and others, and self-concept by providing social-emotional support, instrumental support, and guidance. Results also revealed that relationships were more likely to endure when youth chose their mentors on their own (rather than receiving help from parents or program staff) and when mentors were of the same race as youth.

Darlington, E. M. Decreasing misperceptions of sexual violence to increase bystander intervention: A social norms intervention. (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from University of Oregon Libraries.

Link: https://scholarsbank.uoregon.edu/xmlui/handle/1794/18489

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Peer-led Curricular Activities/Training, YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), PATIENT/CONSUMER, Community-Based Group Education

Intervention Results:

There was evidence that both interventions, when analyzed together and compared to the control group, were effective at decreasing rape myth acceptance. When analyzed separately, both SWAT and SWAT plus were effective at increasing the number of helpful bystander behaviors participants could list and increasing bystander self-efficacy. The SWAT plus intervention appeared to be more effective at increasing actual bystander intervention behavior. The SWAT intervention appeared to be more effective at increasing intention to help. There were also mixed results for the effectiveness at posttest and follow-up.

Cigularov K, Chen PY, Thurber BW, Stallones L. What prevents adolescents from seeking help after a suicide education program? Suicide Life Threat Behav 2008;38(1): 74–86.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18355110

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Peer-led Curricular Activities/Training, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Group Education, Peer Counselor, YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling

Intervention Results:

The most prominent barriers for self were: inability to discuss problems with adults, self-overconfidence, fear of hospitalization, and lack of closeness to school adults. The most prominent barriers for troubled friends were: friendship concerns, unapproachability of school adults, fear of friend's hospitalization, and underestimating friend's problems.

Wyman PA, Brown CH, LoMurray M, Schmeelk-Cone K, Petrova M, Yu Q, . . . Wang W. An outcome evaluation of the Sources of Strength suicide-prevention program delivered by adolescent peer leaders in high schools. American Journal of Public Health 2010;100: 1653–1661.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2920978/

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling, CLASSROOM, Peer-led Curricular Activities/Training

Intervention Results:

Training improved the peer leaders' adaptive norms regarding suicide, their connectedness to adults, and their school engagement, with the largest gains for those entering with the least adaptive norms. Trained peer leaders in larger schools were 4 times as likely as were untrained peer leaders to refer a suicidal friend to an adult. Among students, the intervention increased perceptions of adult support for suicidal youths and the acceptability of seeking help. Perception of adult support increased most in students with a history of suicidal ideation.
   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.