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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 4 (4 total).

DiMaggio C, Li G. Effectiveness of a safe routes to school program in preventing school-aged pedestrian injury. Pediatrics 2013;131: 290-6.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3557410/

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): STATE, Policy/Guideline (State), NATIONAL, Policy/Guideline (National), COMMUNITY, Other (Communities)

Intervention Results:

During the study period, the annual rate of pedestrian injury decreased 33% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 30 to 36) among school-aged children (5- to 19-year-olds) and 14% (95% CI: 12 to 16) in other age groups. The annual rate of school-aged pedestrian injury during school-travel hours decreased 44% (95% CI: 17 to 65) from 8.0 injuries per 10 000 population in the preintervention period (2001–2008) to 4.4 injuries per 10 000 population in the postintervention period (2009–2010) in census tracts with SRTS interventions. The rate remained virtually unchanged in census tracts without SRTS interventions (0% [95% CI: –8 to 8]).

Hawkins JD, Oesterle S, Brown EC, Arthur MW, Abbott RD, Fagan AA, et al. Results of a type 2 translational research trial to prevent adolescent drug use and delinquency: a test of communities that care. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 2009;163(9): 789–98.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2740999/

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): COMMUNITY, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Outreach, Training, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, Other (Communities)

Intervention Results:

The incidences of delinquent behavior, alcohol, cigarette, and smokeless tobacco initiation were significantly lower in CTC than in control communities between grades 5 and 8. In grade 8, the prevalences of alcohol and smokeless tobacco use in the last 30 days, binge drinking in the past 2 weeks, and the number of different delinquent behaviors committed in the past year in grade 8 were significantly lower in CTC communities.

Hawkins, J. D., Oesterle, S., Brown, E. C., Monahan, K. C., Abbott, R. D., Arthur, M. W., & Catalano, R. F. (2012). Sustained decreases in risk exposure and youth problem behaviors after installation of the communities that care prevention system in a randomized trial. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 166, 141–148.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4137869/

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): COMMUNITY, Training, Other (Communities)

Intervention Results:

Mean levels of targeted risks increased less rapidly between grades 5 and 10 in CTC than in control communities and were significantly lower in CTC than control communities in grade 10. The incidence of delinquent behavior, alcohol use, and cigarette use, and the prevalence of current cigarette use and past-year delinquent and violent behavior were significantly lower in CTC than in control communities in grade 10.

Lee KS, Conigrave KM, Clough AR, Wallace C, Silins E, Rawles J. Evaluation of a community-driven preventive youth initiative in Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, Australia. Drug Alcohol Rev 2008;27:75–82. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09595230701711124.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09595230701711124

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): COMMUNITY, Other (Communities), Outreach, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Assessment (patient/consumer), Training, YOUTH, Assessment

Intervention Results:

Interviewees reported increased youth training and recreational opportunities, increased communication between local agencies, overall satisfaction with programme delivery and optimism that it could achieve its goals. Suggested improvements included even more training, cultural programmes and other activities and employment of more community-based Indigenous staff. The importance of key staff, involvement of a respected Indigenous staff member and community engagement were noted as probable contributors to its success.
   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.