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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 20 (75 total).

Frey, K. S., Hirschstein, M. K., Edstrom, L. V., & Snell, J. L. (2009). Observed reductions on school bullying, nonbullying aggression, and destructive bystander behavior: A longitudinal evaluation. Journal of Educational Psychology, 101, 466–481.

Link: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2009-04640-018

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, School Rules, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide)

Intervention Results:

Growth curve models of intervention students showed 2-year declines in playground bullying, victimization, nonbullying aggression, destructive bystander, and argumentative behavior. Grade-equivalent contrasts indicated group differences in all problem behaviors. Problem behaviors in the control group increased or remained stable across grade. Intervention group students reported less difficulty responding assertively to bullying compared with control students. Within both groups, older students perceived themselves to be more aggressive and less frequently victimized than younger students.

Joronen, K., Konu, A., Rankin, H. S., & Astedt-Kurki, P. (2011). An evaluation of a drama program to enhance social relationships and anti-bullying at elementary school: A controlled study. Health Promotion International, 27, 5–14.

Link: https://academic.oup.com/heapro/article/27/1/5/663869

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Group Education

Intervention Results:

Data on social relationships in the class room and experiences of bullying were obtained before and after the program using self-completed questionnaire from the same students (n = 134). The response rate was 71%. No differences in socio-demographics existed between intervention group and control group at pretest. The positive effect on social relationships resulting from the intervention approached statistical significance (p = 0.065). Moreover, the positive effect was found to be statistically significant in the high-intensity intervention classes (p = 0.011). Bullying victimization decreased 20.7 percentage units from pretest (58.8%) to posttest (38.1%) in the intervention group (p < 0.05).

Roland, E., Bru, E., Midthassel, U. V., & Vaaland, G. S. (2010). The Zero programme against bullying: Effects of the programme in the context of the Norwegian manifesto against bullying. Social Psychology of Education, 13, 41–55.

Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11218-009-9096-0

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The present study shows that bullying was reduced among pupils in the schools participating in the Zero programme. Moreover, National surveys in spring 2001 and spring 2004 showed a reduction in pupils being victimised in Norway over 3 years. The high profiled national Manifesto Against Bullying started officially in September 2002 and the first period lasted 2 years. The majority of the schools comprising the 2004 national sample reported a substantial increase in anti-bullying work compared to the three-year period before 2001.

Williford, A., Boulton, A., Noland, B., Little, T. D., Karna, A., & Salmivalli, C. (2012). Effects of the KiVa anti-bullying program on adolescents' depression, anxiety, and perception of peers. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 40, 289–300.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21822630

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation

Intervention Results:

A cross-lagged panel model suggested that the KiVa program is effective for reducing students' internalizing problems and improving their peer-group perceptions. Finally, changes in anxiety, depression, and positive peer perceptions were found to be predicted by reductions in victimization. Implications of the findings and future directions for research are discussed.

Wong, D. S.W., Cheng, C. H. K., Ngan, R. M. H., & Ma, S. K. (2011). Program effectiveness of a restorative whole-school approach for tackling school bullying in Hong Kong. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 55, 846–862.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20639403

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, School Rules, CLASSROOM, Enforcement of School Rules, Class Rules, PARENT/FAMILY, Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver), YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The group that received the RWsA treatment exhibited a significant reduction of bullying, higher empathic attitudes, and higher self-esteem in comparison to the partial intervention and the control group.

Emery CA, Meeuwisse WH. (2010).The effectiveness of a neuromuscular prevention strategy to reduce injuries in youth soccer: A cluster-randomised controlled trial. Br J Sports Med 2010;44:555-62.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20547668

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, Other Education, SCHOOL, Extra-Curricular Activities

Intervention Results:

The injury rate in the training group was 2.08 injuries/1000 player-hours, and in the control group 3.35 injuries/1000 player-hours. Based on Poisson regression analysis, adjusted for clustering by team and covariates, the incidence rate ratios (IRR) for all injuries and acute onset injury were 0.62 (95% CI 0.39 to 0.99) and 0.57 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.91). Point estimates also suggest protection of lower extremity, ankle and knee sprain injuries (IRR=0.68 (95% CI 0.42 to 1.11), IRR=0.5 (95% CI 0.24 to 1.04) and IRR=0.38 (95% CI 0.08 to 1.75)).

Kiani, A, Hellquist E, Ahlqvist K, et al. (2010). Prevention of soccer-related knee injuries in teenaged girls. Arch Intern Med 2010;170:43-9.

Link: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/481521

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, Other Person-to-Person Education, Group Education, SCHOOL, Extra-Curricular Activities

Intervention Results:

Three knee injuries occurred in the intervention group and 13 occurred in the control group, corresponding to incidence rates of 0.04 and 0.20, respectively, per 1000 player hours. The preventive program was associated with a 77% reduction in knee injury incidence (crude rate ratio, 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.04-0.83). The noncontact knee injury incidence rate was 90% lower in the intervention group (crude rate ratio, 0.10; 95% confidence interval, 0.00-0.70). Adjustment for potential confounders strengthened the estimates. Forty-five of the 48 intervention teams (94%) reported a high adherence of at least 75%.

Longo UG, Loppini M, Berton A, et al. (2012) The FIFA 11+ program is effective in preventing injuries in elite male basketball players: a cluster randomized controlled trial. Am J Sports Med 2012;40:996-1005.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22415208

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Group Education, Other Education, SCHOOL, Extra-Curricular Activities, Educational Material

Intervention Results:

During the 9-month season, 23 (19%) of the 121 players included in the study sustained a total of 31 injuries (14 in the intervention group and 17 in the control group). In the intervention group, injury rates per 1000 athlete-exposures were lower than those in the control group, with statistical significance, for overall injuries (0.95 vs 2.16; P = .0004), training injuries (0.14 vs 0.76; P = .007), lower extremity injuries (0.68 vs 1.4; P = .022), acute injuries (0.61 vs 1.91; P < .0001), and severe injuries (0 vs 0.51; P = .004). The intervention group also had statistically significant lower injury rates for trunk (0.07 vs 0.51; P = .013), leg (0 vs 0.38; P = .007), and hip and groin (0 vs 0.25; P = .023) compared with the control group. There was no statistically significant difference in match injuries, knee injuries, ankle injuries, and overuse injuries between 2 groups. The most frequent acute injury diagnoses were ligament sprains (0.41 and 0.38 in the intervention and control groups, respectively; P < .006) and contractures (0.76 and 0.07 in the control and intervention groups, respectively; P < .003).

Steffen K1, Myklebust G, Olsen OE, Holme I, Bahr R. (2008). Preventing injuries in female youth football--a cluster-randomized controlled trial. Scand J Med Sci Sports 2008;18:605-14.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18208428

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Group Education, Other Education

Intervention Results:

A total of 396 players (20%) sustained 483 injuries. No difference was observed in the overall injury rate between the intervention (3.6 injuries/1000 h, confidence interval (CI) 3.2-4.1) and control group (3.7, CI 3.2-4.1; RR=1.0, CI 0.8-1.2; P=0.94) nor in the incidence for any type of injury. During the first 4 months of the season, the training program was used during 60% of the football training sessions, but only 14 out of 58 intervention teams completed more than 20 prevention training sessions.

Steffen K, Emery CA, Romiti M, et al. (2013). High adherence to a neuromuscular injury prevention programme (FIFA 11+) improves functional balance and reduces injury risk in Canadian youth female football players: a cluster randomized controlled trial. Br J Sports Med 2013;47:794-802.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23559666

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, SCHOOL, Extra-Curricular Activities

Intervention Results:

Complete preseason and postseason performance tests were available for 226 players (66.5%). Compared to the unsupervised group, single-leg balance (OR=2.8; 95% CI 1.1 to 4.6) and the anterior direction of the SEBT improved significantly in the onfield supervised group of players (OR=4.7; 95% CI 2.2 to 7.1), while 2-leg jumping performance decreased (OR=-5.1; 95% CI -9.9 to -0.2). However, significant improvements in 5 of 6 reach distances in the SEBT were found, favouring players who highly adhered to the 11+. Also, injury risk was lower for those players (injury rate ratio, IRR=0.28, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.79).

Walden M, Atroshi I, Magnussen H, et al. (2012). Prevention of acute knee injuries in adolescent female football players: Cluster randomized controlled trial. BMJ 2012;344:e3042

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22556050

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Other Education, SCHOOL, Extra-Curricular Activities

Intervention Results:

Seven players (0.28%) in the intervention group, and 14 (0.67%) in the control group had an anterior cruciate ligament injury. By Cox regression analysis according to intention to treat, a 64% reduction in the rate of anterior cruciate ligament injury was seen in the intervention group (rate ratio 0.36, 95% confidence interval 0.15 to 0.85). The absolute rate difference was -0.07 (95% confidence interval -0.13 to 0.001) per 1000 playing hours in favour of the intervention group. No significant rate reductions were seen for secondary outcomes.

Collard DCM, Chinapaw MJM, Verhagen E, Bakker I, Mechelen W. (2010). Effectiveness of a school-based physical activity-related injury prevention program on risk behavior and neuromotor fitness a cluster randomized controlled trial. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity 2010;28:7–9.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2835649/

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, SCHOOL, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media)

Intervention Results:

The iPlay-program was not able to significantly improve injury-preventing behavior. The program did significantly improve knowledge and attitude, two determinants of behavior. The effect of the intervention-program on behavior appeared to be significantly mediated by knowledge and attitude. Improved scores on attitude, social norm, self-efficacy and intention were significantly related to changes in injury preventing behavior. Furthermore, iPlay resulted in small non-significant improvements in neuromotor fitness in favor of the intervention group.

Collard DCM, Verhagen EALM, Chinapaw MJM et al. (2010b). Effectiveness of a school-based physical activity injury prevention program: a cluster randomized controlled trial. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2010; 164:145-150.

Link: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/382761

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media)

Intervention Results:

A total of 100 injuries in the intervention group and 104 injuries in the control group were registered. Nonresponse at baseline or follow-up was minimal (8.7%). The Cox regression analyses adjusted for clustering showed a small nonsignificant intervention effect on total (HR, 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41-1.59), sports club (0.69; 0.28-1.68), and leisure time injuries (0.75; 0.36-1.55). However, physical activity appeared to be an effect modifier. In those who were less physically active, the intervention had a larger effect. The intervention reduced the total and leisure time injury incidence (HR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.21-1.06; and 0.43; 0.16-1.14; respectively). Sports club injury incidence was significantly reduced (HR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.07-0.75).

Allabaugh CT, Maltz S, Carlson G, Watcharotone, K. Education and prevention for teens: using trauma nurses Talk Tough presentation with pretest and posttest evaluation of knowledge and behavior changes. Journal of Trauma Nursing 2008;15(3): 102-111.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18820557

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Group Education, Other Person-to-Person Education, HOSPITAL, Visual Display (Hospital)

Intervention Results:

Need full article

Groesz LM. A conceptual evaluation of a school-based utilitarian exercise model [Dissertation]. Austin, Texas, USA: The University of Texas at Austin, 2009.

Link: https://repositories.lib.utexas.edu/handle/2152/18343

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training

Intervention Results:

It was found that experimental students displayed significantly greater knowledge, a trend toward greater motication, and greater recreational bicycling at follow-up compared to waitlist students. Students in both conditions displayed significant increases in bicycle self-efficacy. Motivation served as a partial mediator between the intervention and recreational bicycling. On a contectual level, based on the Social Ecology Model, two predicted moderators were perceived environment, including the build environment such as sidewalks, equipment accessibility, and parental support. On an individual level, an expected moderator was current weight. This evaluation also explored health behavior and students' sex. When these moderators were included in the model, perceived environment and students' sex served the clearest roles, independent of condition. For example, students in a more activity- conducive environments displayed greater physical activity self-efficacy and recreational bicycling compared to students in less conducive environments. Furthermore, males displayed greater motivation and bicycling to school that females. Qualitative data collected from parents emphasized the importance of proximity and safety in determining whether to allow active commuting.

Bart O, Katz N, Weiss PL, Josman N. Street crossing by typically developed children in real and virtual environments. OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health 2008;28: 89–96.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.3928/15394492-20080301-01

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Online Material/Education/Blogging

Intervention Results:

Results indicate that children in the training group significantly improved their street crossing abilities in both the virtual reality simulation and the real street crossing in comparison to the control group. Street crossing became safer with increasing age, but no differences were found between boys and girls. This low-cost and readily available street crossing simulation had a positive effect on children's street crossing behavior in the real environment and on their self-reported satisfaction.

Anderson SW, Moore PA (2008). The impact of education and school-based counseling on children's and adolescents' views of substance abuse. Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse 2008;18(1): 16–23.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15470650802526526

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PARENT/FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Results indicated that preexisting views significantly differed from post-intervention views, and that the Life Skills Training Program provided participants with a more accurate view of substance abuse.

Clark HK, Ringwalt CL, Shamblen SR, Hanley SM. Project success' effects on substance use-related attitudes and behaviors: a randomized controlled trial in alternative high schools. J Drug Educ 2011; 41(1): 17-44.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21675323

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Group Education

Intervention Results:

Although participation in Project SUCCESS significantly increased students' perceptions of harm resulting from alcohol and marijuana use, students in the control group reported greater increases in peer support. We also found conflicting evidence in two opposing trends related to students' perceptions of the prevalence and acceptability of substance use.

Conrod PJ, Castellanos-Ryan N, Mackie C. Long-term effects of a personality-targeted intervention to reduce alcohol use in adolescents. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 2011; 79(3): 296–306.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21500886

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, Assessment

Intervention Results:

Intent-to-treat repeated measures analyses revealed a significant overall intervention effect in reducing problem drinking symptoms, and a Time × Intervention effect on drinking QF and binge drinking frequency. Relative to the control group, the intervention group showed significantly reduced drinking and binge drinking levels at 6 months postintervention and reduced problem drinking symptoms for the full 24-month follow-up period (Cohen's d = 0.33). A significant Time × Intervention × Personality interaction was demonstrated for coping and enhancement drinking motives. In addition to an overall effect of intervention on coping motives, the AS group who received that intervention reported fewer coping motives compared with the AS control group at 12 and 24 months postintervention.

D'Amico EJ, Tucker JS, Miles JN, Zhou AJ, Shih RA, Green HD Jr. Preventing alcohol use with a voluntary after-school program for middle school students: results from a cluster randomized controlled trial of CHOICE. Prev Sci 2012;13(4):415–25.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3353018/

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training

Intervention Results:

Lifetime alcohol use in the ITT analysis (i.e., school level) achieved statistical significance, with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.70 and a number needed to treat (NNT) of 14.8. The NNT suggests that in a school where PC was offered, 1 adolescent out of 15 was prevented from initiating alcohol use during this time period. Although not statistically significant (p=.20), results indicate that past month alcohol use was also lower in PC schools (OR = 0.81; NNT = 45). Comparisons of attenders versus matched controls yielded results for lifetime use similar to school-wide effects (OR = 0.74 and NNT = 17.6).
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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.