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Displaying records 1 through 20 (110 total).

Andreou E, Didaskalou E and Vlachou A (2008) Outcomes of a curriculum-based anti-bullying intervention program on students’ attitudes and behavior. Emotional and Behavior Difficulties 13(4): 235–248.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13632750802442110

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training

Intervention Results:

The findings indicate positive short‐term program outcomes concerning students' attitudes towards bullies and victims, perceived efficacy of intervening in bully–victim incidents and actual rates of intervening behavior. However, the magnitude of the program effects was quite small, since the positive short‐term outcomes were not sustained in the long‐term (post‐test two measures). The results of the study also indicated clear time effects for attitudes towards bullies and victims, self‐efficacy of intervening and intention, as well as actual intervening behavior.

Brown, E. C., Low, S., Smith, B. H., & Haggerty, K. P. (2011). Outcomes from a school randomized controlled trial of steps to respect: A bullying prevention program. School Psychology Review, 40(3), 423–443.

Link: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2011-25041-006

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, Reporting & Response System, YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling

Intervention Results:

Multilevel analyses indicated significant (p < .05) positive effects of the program on a range of outcomes (e.g., improved student climate, lower levels of physical bullying perpetration, less school bullying- related problems). Results of this study support the program as an efficacious intervention for the prevention of bullying in schools.

Domino, M. (2011). The impact of Take the LEAD on school bullying among middle school youth. (Doctoral dissertation, Available from the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses database. (UMI No. 3434870)).

Link: https://search.proquest.com/openview/e8aa06c402754493b262da6429b5d4e9/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=18750&diss=y

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Group Education

Intervention Results:

Results indicated significant reductions in bullying and victimization, together with significant increases in prosocial behaviors, including helping, sharing, feeling empathy, and caring for others. Findings remained significant for all 3 study variables after controlling for gender. Results of this study contribute to positive social change by providing empirical support for the application of an original social-emotional learning alternative to reduce bullying and victimization, while simultaneously increasing prosocial behaviors.

Frey, K. S., Hirschstein, M. K., Edstrom, L. V., & Snell, J. L. (2009). Observed reductions on school bullying, nonbullying aggression, and destructive bystander behavior: A longitudinal evaluation. Journal of Educational Psychology, 101, 466–481.

Link: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2009-04640-018

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, School Rules, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide)

Intervention Results:

Growth curve models of intervention students showed 2-year declines in playground bullying, victimization, nonbullying aggression, destructive bystander, and argumentative behavior. Grade-equivalent contrasts indicated group differences in all problem behaviors. Problem behaviors in the control group increased or remained stable across grade. Intervention group students reported less difficulty responding assertively to bullying compared with control students. Within both groups, older students perceived themselves to be more aggressive and less frequently victimized than younger students.

Jenson, J. M., Dieterich, W. A., Brisson, D., Bender, K. A., & Powell, A. (2010). Preventing childhood bullying: Findings and lessons from the Denver Public Schools trial. Research on Social Work Practice, 20, 509–517.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1049731509359186

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training

Intervention Results:

Linear growth models were fitted to five waves of data collected over 3 years to test the effect of the intervention on the rate of change in self-reported bullying and victimization. Participation in YM was associated with a 7% decline in bully victimization 1 year after the intervention ended.

Joronen, K., Konu, A., Rankin, H. S., & Astedt-Kurki, P. (2011). An evaluation of a drama program to enhance social relationships and anti-bullying at elementary school: A controlled study. Health Promotion International, 27, 5–14.

Link: https://academic.oup.com/heapro/article/27/1/5/663869

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Group Education

Intervention Results:

Data on social relationships in the class room and experiences of bullying were obtained before and after the program using self-completed questionnaire from the same students (n = 134). The response rate was 71%. No differences in socio-demographics existed between intervention group and control group at pretest. The positive effect on social relationships resulting from the intervention approached statistical significance (p = 0.065). Moreover, the positive effect was found to be statistically significant in the high-intensity intervention classes (p = 0.011). Bullying victimization decreased 20.7 percentage units from pretest (58.8%) to posttest (38.1%) in the intervention group (p < 0.05).

Krueger, L. M. (2010). The implementation of an anti-bullying program to reduce bullying behaviors on elementary school buses. (Doctoral dissertation, Available from the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses database.)

Link: https://search.proquest.com/openview/f46dd8b9303afffbe699e2e215aeccd7/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=18750&diss=y

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Online Material/Education/Blogging

Intervention Results:

Pretest and posttest data indicated a significant decrease in bullying behaviors for both the control and treatment groups, with the experimental group exhibiting a greater reduction in bullying behaviors than the control group. The results instead seem to show that the anti-bullying intervention had a spillover effect, producing successful reductions in bullying behaviors over time for both groups, though clearly considerably more so for the group that received the intervention than for the control group.

Roland, E., Bru, E., Midthassel, U. V., & Vaaland, G. S. (2010). The Zero programme against bullying: Effects of the programme in the context of the Norwegian manifesto against bullying. Social Psychology of Education, 13, 41–55.

Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11218-009-9096-0

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The present study shows that bullying was reduced among pupils in the schools participating in the Zero programme. Moreover, National surveys in spring 2001 and spring 2004 showed a reduction in pupils being victimised in Norway over 3 years. The high profiled national Manifesto Against Bullying started officially in September 2002 and the first period lasted 2 years. The majority of the schools comprising the 2004 national sample reported a substantial increase in anti-bullying work compared to the three-year period before 2001.

Salmivalli, C., Karna, A., & Poskiparta, E. (2011). Counteracting bullying in Finland: The KiVa program and its effects on different forms of being bullied. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 35, 405–411.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0165025411407457

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Online Material/Education/Blogging, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), CAREGIVER, Educational Material (caregiver), SCHOOL, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media)

Intervention Results:

The findings showed positive effects on each form of being bullied assessed. After 9 months of intervention, control school students were 1.32— 1.94 times as likely to be bullied as students in intervention schools.

Stan, C., & Beldean, I. G. (2014). The development of social and emotional skills of students - Ways to reduce the frequency of bullying-type events. Experimental results. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 114,735-743.

Link: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Cristian_Stan2/publication/273851529_The_Development_of_Social_and_Emotional_Skills_of_Students-ways_to_Reduce_the_Frequency_of_Bullying-type_Events_Experimental_Results/links/56b4662208ae1f8aa4542bc1.pdf

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), SCHOOL, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media)

Intervention Results:

Comparing the results of the pretest stage with the data from the posttest stage indicates a significant reduction in violence among the students in the experimental group compared to the control group.

Toner, B. K. (2010). The implementation of the bullying prevention program: Bully proofing your school and its effects on bullying and school climate on sixth grade suburban students. (Doctoral dissertation, Available from the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses database. (UMI No. 3414552))

Link: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED521861

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, School Rules, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training

Intervention Results:

Results revealed both groups, experimental and control, increased in school climate and were not significantly different from one another when looking at time by group (research question one); there was a noticeable dip in victimization in the experimental group from pretest to posttest, but the dip was not statistically significant (research question two); bullying did decrease significantly from pretest to posttest in the control group, but did not significantly differ from pretest to posttest in the experimental group (research question three). Two additional questions were added considering BPYS impact on student absenteeism and student (behavioral) referrals. Results revealed while both remained similar from pretest to posttest (3.5%) with regard to absenteeism, absenteeism in experimental group at posttest was slightly higher (4%) compared to the control (2.8%). Students in the control group were more likely to miss school due to fear (11%) when compared to the experimental group (4%). Reasons for fear were closely divided between fear of other students and schoolwork related fears in both groups. Results regarding intervention effect on student referrals, considerable reporting disparities between the two schools involved in this study impeded the ability to draw reasonable comparisons between the two groups for purposes of this study.

Williford, A., Boulton, A., Noland, B., Little, T. D., Karna, A., & Salmivalli, C. (2012). Effects of the KiVa anti-bullying program on adolescents' depression, anxiety, and perception of peers. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 40, 289–300.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21822630

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation

Intervention Results:

A cross-lagged panel model suggested that the KiVa program is effective for reducing students' internalizing problems and improving their peer-group perceptions. Finally, changes in anxiety, depression, and positive peer perceptions were found to be predicted by reductions in victimization. Implications of the findings and future directions for research are discussed.

Wong, D. S.W., Cheng, C. H. K., Ngan, R. M. H., & Ma, S. K. (2011). Program effectiveness of a restorative whole-school approach for tackling school bullying in Hong Kong. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 55, 846–862.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20639403

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, School Rules, CLASSROOM, Enforcement of School Rules, Class Rules, PARENT/FAMILY, Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver), YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The group that received the RWsA treatment exhibited a significant reduction of bullying, higher empathic attitudes, and higher self-esteem in comparison to the partial intervention and the control group.

Wright, W., Bailey, C. L., & Bergin, J. J. (2012). The effects of a bullying intervention program on the relational aggressive behaviors of 5th grade girls. Georgia School Counselors Association Journal, 19(1), 65–91.

Link: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ998933

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Online Material/Education/Blogging, Group Education

Intervention Results:

Results showed that the bullying intervention program did decrease the relational aggressive behaviors among the participants and indicated that interventions increased participants' knowledge of relational aggression.

Collard DCM, Chinapaw MJM, Verhagen E, Bakker I, Mechelen W. (2010). Effectiveness of a school-based physical activity-related injury prevention program on risk behavior and neuromotor fitness a cluster randomized controlled trial. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity 2010;28:7–9.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2835649/

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, SCHOOL, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media)

Intervention Results:

The iPlay-program was not able to significantly improve injury-preventing behavior. The program did significantly improve knowledge and attitude, two determinants of behavior. The effect of the intervention-program on behavior appeared to be significantly mediated by knowledge and attitude. Improved scores on attitude, social norm, self-efficacy and intention were significantly related to changes in injury preventing behavior. Furthermore, iPlay resulted in small non-significant improvements in neuromotor fitness in favor of the intervention group.

Collard DCM, Verhagen EALM, Chinapaw MJM et al. (2010b). Effectiveness of a school-based physical activity injury prevention program: a cluster randomized controlled trial. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2010; 164:145-150.

Link: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/382761

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media)

Intervention Results:

A total of 100 injuries in the intervention group and 104 injuries in the control group were registered. Nonresponse at baseline or follow-up was minimal (8.7%). The Cox regression analyses adjusted for clustering showed a small nonsignificant intervention effect on total (HR, 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41-1.59), sports club (0.69; 0.28-1.68), and leisure time injuries (0.75; 0.36-1.55). However, physical activity appeared to be an effect modifier. In those who were less physically active, the intervention had a larger effect. The intervention reduced the total and leisure time injury incidence (HR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.21-1.06; and 0.43; 0.16-1.14; respectively). Sports club injury incidence was significantly reduced (HR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.07-0.75).

Banfield JM, Gomez M, Kiss A, et al. Effectiveness of the PARTY (prevent alcohol and risk-related trauma in youth) program preventing traumatic injuries: a 10-year analysis. J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2011;70: 732-5.

Link: https://www.islandhealth.ca/sites/default/files/2018-06/effectiveness-of-party-2011.pdf

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training

Intervention Results:

Of 3,905 P.A.R.T.Y. participants, 1,281 were successfully randomly matched on the above 4 variables with 1,281 controls. The most frequent injury was injury by other or homicide 373 of 2,562 (14.8%). There were fewer traumatic injuries in the STUDY group than in the CONTROL group (43.3% vs. 47.4%; p 0.02; OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.03–1.45). This difference was stronger in females (44.4% vs. 49.0%; p 0.04) and before the graduating driver licensing system implementation (60.1% vs. 67.2%; p 0.04).

Groesz LM. A conceptual evaluation of a school-based utilitarian exercise model [Dissertation]. Austin, Texas, USA: The University of Texas at Austin, 2009.

Link: https://repositories.lib.utexas.edu/handle/2152/18343

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training

Intervention Results:

It was found that experimental students displayed significantly greater knowledge, a trend toward greater motication, and greater recreational bicycling at follow-up compared to waitlist students. Students in both conditions displayed significant increases in bicycle self-efficacy. Motivation served as a partial mediator between the intervention and recreational bicycling. On a contectual level, based on the Social Ecology Model, two predicted moderators were perceived environment, including the build environment such as sidewalks, equipment accessibility, and parental support. On an individual level, an expected moderator was current weight. This evaluation also explored health behavior and students' sex. When these moderators were included in the model, perceived environment and students' sex served the clearest roles, independent of condition. For example, students in a more activity- conducive environments displayed greater physical activity self-efficacy and recreational bicycling compared to students in less conducive environments. Furthermore, males displayed greater motivation and bicycling to school that females. Qualitative data collected from parents emphasized the importance of proximity and safety in determining whether to allow active commuting.

Bart O, Katz N, Weiss PL, Josman N. Street crossing by typically developed children in real and virtual environments. OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health 2008;28: 89–96.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.3928/15394492-20080301-01

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Online Material/Education/Blogging

Intervention Results:

Results indicate that children in the training group significantly improved their street crossing abilities in both the virtual reality simulation and the real street crossing in comparison to the control group. Street crossing became safer with increasing age, but no differences were found between boys and girls. This low-cost and readily available street crossing simulation had a positive effect on children's street crossing behavior in the real environment and on their self-reported satisfaction.

Anderson SW, Moore PA (2008). The impact of education and school-based counseling on children's and adolescents' views of substance abuse. Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse 2008;18(1): 16–23.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15470650802526526

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PARENT/FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Results indicated that preexisting views significantly differed from post-intervention views, and that the Life Skills Training Program provided participants with a more accurate view of substance abuse.
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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.