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Displaying records 1 through 20 (249 total).

Andreou E, Didaskalou E and Vlachou A (2008) Outcomes of a curriculum-based anti-bullying intervention program on students’ attitudes and behavior. Emotional and Behavior Difficulties 13(4): 235–248. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training
Intervention Description: The aim of this paper was to examine the short‐term and long‐term effects of a curriculum‐based anti‐bullying intervention program on students' attitudes towards bullying, intentions to intervene in bully–victim problems, perceived efficacy of intervening and actual intervening behavior. The intervention program was applied in primary schools and was implemented by trained teachers within the classroom context.
Conclusion: The findings indicate positive short-term program outcomes concerning students’ attitudes to bullies and victims, perceived efficacy in intervening in bully–victim incidents and actual rates of intervention. However, it cannot be concluded that the intervention program was successful in converting anti-bullying attitudes into actual intervening behavior and making students react against bullies because (a) the effects of attitudes on behavior were not examined in this study and (b) intervening behavior steadily decreased across time for all children. Therefore, the greater levels of intervening behavior shown by the experimental group compared with the control group at post-test 1 seem to be due to a slower rate of intervention decrease rather than any increase in intervention levels. Apart from intervening behavior, the findings also indicate clear time effects for attitudes to bullies and victims, self-efficacy and intention to intervene. The evidence from the present study further endorses previous works indicating an escalation with age in children’s pro-bully attitudes and consequently diminishing levels of intervening to terminate bully–victim episodes (Salmivalli 2001; Rigby and Slee 1991). As Salmivalli (2001) indicated, pro-bully attitudes increase with age and older children become less concerned and empathic for victims of bullying and, consequently, they may tend to encourage and reinforce peer aggression. Further, research conducted by Rigby and Slee (1991) on a sample of Australian school children between the ages of 6 and 16 years revealed that the mean scores on the ‘Pro-victim Scale’ were higher for groups of children under the age of 12 years. This trend towards less positive attitudes from childhood to mid adolescence was similar for both sexes, suggesting that the postulated growth in capacity for empathy as a child becomes older did not result in a growing tendency for them to sympathize with the victims of bullies in the school context – indeed, there is evidence of a contrary effect.
Study Design: Quasi-experimental
Setting: Elementary schools
Target Audience: Pupils drawn from fourth to sixth grade classrooms of 10 primary schools in central Greece
Data Source: Questionnaires completed by the students
Sample Size: 248 students—126 boys and 122 girls
Age Range: Not specified

Bowllan, N. M. (2011). Implementation and evaluation of a comprehensive, school-wide bullying prevention program in an urban/suburban middle school. Journal of School Health, 81(4), 167–173. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Assessment, CLASSROOM, Class Rules, Enforcement of School Rules, SCHOOL, Assembly, School Rules, Teacher/Staff Meeting, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Assessment (patient/consumer), Bullying Committee
Intervention Description: A quasi-experimental design consisting of a time-lagged contrast between age-equivalent groups was utilized. Baseline data collected for 158 students prior to implementation of the OBPP were compared to 112 students who received the OBPP intervention for 1 year. Multiple perspectives on bullying were collected using the Revised-Olweus Bully/Victim Questionnaire. Similarly, a teacher questionnaire collected data for 17 teachers on prevalence of bullying and capacity to intervene pre- and post- OBPP intervention. Descriptive and inferential statistics were generated to analyze findings.
Conclusion: Findings suggest a significant positive impact of the OBPP on 7th grade females and teachers. Other grade and gender findings were inconsistent with previous literature. Recommendations for further research are provided along with implications for school health prevention programming.
Study Design: Quasi-experimental design that consisted of a time- lagged contrast between age- equivalent groups
Setting: Middle School
Target Audience: 7th & 8th grade students in a Catholic school in the Northeastern US
Data Source: Questionnaires by students and teachers
Sample Size: 122 students
Age Range: Not specified

Brown, E. C., Low, S., Smith, B. H., & Haggerty, K. P. (2011). Outcomes from a school randomized controlled trial of steps to respect: A bullying prevention program. School Psychology Review, 40(3), 423–443. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, Reporting & Response System, YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling
Intervention Description: This study reports the outcomes of a randomized controlled trial of Steps to Respect: A Bullying Prevention Program conducted in 33 California elementary schools. Schools were matched on school demographic characteristics and assigned randomly to intervention or waitlisted control conditions. Outcome measures were obtained from (a) all school staff; (b) a randomly selected subset of third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade teachers in each school; and (c) all students in classrooms of selected teachers.
Conclusion: In addition to intervention and covariate effects, our results include estimates of intraclass correlations of classroom and school variability to help researchers plan future school-randomized trials of bullying prevention programs. Observed intraclass correlation coefficients indicated that appreciable levels of variation in staff and teacher reported outcomes exist at both classroom and school levels. This suggests that both the classroom and the entire school building are viable, perhaps even necessary, environments for preventive intervention.
Study Design: RCT
Setting: Elementary schools
Target Audience: Students in 3rd–5th grade in 33 California elementary schools
Data Source: Questionnaires responded to by teachers, administrators, and all other support staff; questionnaires by students
Sample Size: 2,940 students (17 schools in the intervention; 16 schools in control)
Age Range: Not specified

Cross, D., Monks, H., Hall, M., Shaw, T., Pintabona, Y., Erceg, E., et al. (2011). Three year results of the Friendly Schools whole-of-school intervention on children's bullying behavior. British Educational Research Journal, 37, 105–129. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, Bullying Committee, PARENT/FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Education/Training (caregiver), School Rules
Intervention Description: This socio‐ecological intervention targeted the whole school, classroom, family, and individual students to reduce bullying behaviour. Self‐report data were collected in 29 schools over three years from a cohort of 1968 eight to nine‐year‐olds. Surveys measured frequency of being bullied, bullying others, telling if bullied and observing bullying.
Conclusion: The findings suggest whole‐of‐school programs that engage students in their different social contexts appear to reduce their experiences of being bullied and increase their likelihood of telling someone if they are bullied.
Study Design: Group RCT
Setting: Elementary schools
Target Audience: Grade 4 students who were tracked for three years.
Data Source: Questionnaires by students
Sample Size: 1,046 students in 15 schools
Age Range: Not specified

Cross, D., Waters, S., Pearce, N., Shaw, T., Hall, M., Erceg, E., et al. (2012). The Friendly Schools Friendly Families programme: Three-year bullying behaviour outcomes in primary school children. International Journal of Educational Research, 53, 394–406. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, School Rules, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Teacher/Staff Training, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Other Education
Intervention Description: The Friendly Schools Friendly Families (FSFF) conceptual framework shown in Fig. 1 draws on early formative research (Cross, Pintabona, Hall, Hamilton, & Erceg, 2004) as well as outcome and process data collected as part of the Friendly Schools (FS) project conducted between 2000 and 2002 (Cross et al., 2011; Cross et al., 2004). These data suggested that schools required more specific capacity building to successfully implement and sustain the complexities of a whole-school approach to bullying prevention and management. The findings also indicated that intervention at the family level required greater cooperation with the school to assist parents to help their children to deal with bullying. Despite the fact that parents are an essential component of effective school-based bullying intervention programmes, this partnership is often poorly addressed by schools (Georgiou, 2008; Rigby, 1994, 1999; Ross, 1997)
Conclusion: Comprehensive whole-school programmes that include capacity building and parental involvement appear to reduce bullying behaviour more than programmes without these components.
Study Design: Group RCT/ Controlled experimental design and random assignment.
Setting: Schools
Target Audience: Students in Grade 4 and Grade 6
Data Source: Students’ self-reports; peer nomination reports; teacher and parent reports
Sample Size: Students from 20 schools. 1,334 students in the high intervention; 1,109 students in the moderate intervention; 1,454 students in the low intervention.
Age Range: Not specified

Domino, M. (2011). The impact of Take the LEAD on school bullying among middle school youth. (Doctoral dissertation, Available from the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses database. (UMI No. 3434870)). Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Group Education
Intervention Description: The impact of an alternative approach to bullying using a pretest-posttest control group cohort evaluation of 323 middle school students involved in the 16-session Take the LEAD social-emotional learning program was examined. Based on social-emotional learning and positive youth development theories, Take the LEAD employs an interactive, asset-based approach to target the social competencies of all students in the classroom.
Conclusion: Educators, psychologists, public health professionals, and clinicians can use these results to expand existing bullying reduction efforts, assist children and families dealing with bullying and victimization, and broaden the scope and breadth of available alternatives for addressing this growing public health problem
Study Design: A quasiexperimental ageequivalent, time-lag cohort with pretestposttest control
Setting: Middle school
Target Audience: Middle school students enrolled in one suburban public middle school in southern Connecticut
Data Source: Surveys/questionnaires completed by students
Sample Size: 323 middle school students
Age Range: Not specified

Frey, K. S., Hirschstein, M. K., Edstrom, L. V., & Snell, J. L. (2009). Observed reductions on school bullying, nonbullying aggression, and destructive bystander behavior: A longitudinal evaluation. Journal of Educational Psychology, 101, 466–481. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, School Rules, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide)
Intervention Description: Steps to Respect® is a research-based, comprehensive bullying prevention program developed for grades 3 through 6 by Committee for Children, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving children’s lives through effective social and emotional learning programs. The program is designed to decrease school bullying problems by 1) increasing staff awareness and responsiveness, 2) fostering socially responsible beliefs, and 3) teaching social–emotional skills to counter bullying and to promote healthy relationships. The program also aims to promote skills (e.g., joining groups, resolving conflict) associated with general social competence. In sum, the program is designed to promote a safe school environment to counter the detrimental social effects of bullying.
Conclusion: The most robust results of the evaluation came from objective measures of behavior on playgrounds, the arenas in which bullying and victimization are most frequently played out. These showed consistent reductions in problem behavior, especially notable given the increases in bullying typically found at the end of elementary school (Hanish & Guerra, 2004). Comparisons of grade trends in the intervention group with those found in the control group support our conclusion that the program successfully reduced problem behaviors on playgrounds. By sustaining a visible commitment to a respectful environment, educators in our study conveyed a moral authority that is lacking when socially responsible norms are only given lip service. Reductions in problem behaviors strengthened with a second year of program implementation. The changes observed in destructive bystander behavior were so substantial that the behavior almost disappeared. Although there is considerable theory and evidence that bystanders represent crucial elements in the social– ecological context surrounding bullying, this is the first study to actually show changes in bystander behavior. Removing the support of bystanders signals that bullying is no longer an admired behavior, a potent message for peers to send to each other. Research is needed to test whether such alterations in the environmental contingencies are indeed instrumental in reducing playground bullying
Study Design: Longitudinal study/ Extension of an RCT
Setting: Elementary schools
Target Audience: Students in Grades 3–5
Data Source: Surveys by students and teachers; observations on playgrounds
Sample Size: 624 students (225 students intervention; 399 students delayed-intervention)
Age Range: Not specified

Houlston C and Smith PK (2009) The impact of a peer counseling scheme to address bullying in an all-girl London secondary school: A short-term longitudinal study. British Journal of Educational Psychology 79(1): 69–86 Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Peer Counselor
Intervention Description: A variety of peer support schemes are now widely used in schools, notably to reduce bullying. However, there has been little systematic investigation of the impact and effectiveness of these approaches.
Conclusion: Peer-counselling schemes can improve self-esteem of peer supporters, and also impact positively on perceptions of bullying in the school; but impact on actual experiences of bullying is less clear, and there may be problems with the acceptance and use of such programmes by older students.
Study Design: Longitudinal study with qualitative and quantitative data
Setting: Secondary schools
Target Audience: Students in a North London all-girls state secondary school
Data Source: Questionnaires by peer counselors, younger students, and some staff members; discussion groups with the peer counselors
Sample Size: 14 schoolgirls in Year 10
Age Range: Not specified

Jenson, J. M., Dieterich, W. A., Brisson, D., Bender, K. A., & Powell, A. (2010). Preventing childhood bullying: Findings and lessons from the Denver Public Schools trial. Research on Social Work Practice, 20, 509–517. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training
Intervention Description: Twelve-month follow-up outcomes from a group-randomized trial (GRT) of a classroom curriculum aimed at preventing bullying and victimization among elementary students in the Denver, Colorado, public school system are presented. Twenty-eight elementary schools were randomly assigned to receive selected modules of Youth Matters (YM), a skills-training curriculum that targets bullying and victimization, or to a no-treatment control group.
Conclusion: Unable to access conclusion
Study Design: Group randomized trial
Setting: Elementary schools
Target Audience: Students from 28 elementary schools in Denver
Data Source: Student data were collected through classroom surveys conducted in the fall and spring semesters of each academic year
Sample Size: 876 students (438 from 14 schools in the intervention; 438 from 14 schools in control)
Age Range: Not specified

Joronen, K., Konu, A., Rankin, H. S., & Astedt-Kurki, P. (2011). An evaluation of a drama program to enhance social relationships and anti-bullying at elementary school: A controlled study. Health Promotion International, 27, 5–14. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Group Education
Intervention Description: This paper describes the development, implementation and evaluation of a school-based drama program to enhance social relationships and decrease bullying at school in children in grades 4–5 (mean age of 10.4 years). Students (n = 190) were recruited from two primary schools with similar demographics and socio-economics in the Southern Finland and purposively allocated either to an intervention group or a control group. The drama program included classroom drama sessions, follow-up activities at home and three parents’ evenings concerning issues of social well being during the school year September 2007–May 2008.
Conclusion: The study indicates that using applied drama and theater methods in the classroom may improve children's social relationships at school.
Study Design: Quasi-experimental longitudinal study
Setting: Elementary schools
Target Audience: Students from two primary schools in Southern Finland.
Data Source: Self-completed questionnaires by the students
Sample Size: 78 students
Age Range: Not specified

Krueger, L. M. (2010). The implementation of an anti-bullying program to reduce bullying behaviors on elementary school buses. (Doctoral dissertation, Available from the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses database.) Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Online Material/Education/Blogging
Study Design: RCT
Setting: Elementary schools
Target Audience: Elementary students Grades K–5.
Data Source: Video recorded student interactions on the school bus
Sample Size: 47 students
Age Range: Not specified

Lishak, N. (2011). Examination of bullying behaviors and the implementation of a social norms project in a middle school. (Doctoral dissertation, Available from the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses database. (UMI No. 3454156)) Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Assessment, SCHOOL, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media), Assembly, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas
Study Design: Quantitative data
Setting: Middle school
Target Audience: Students in 6th, 7th & 8th grade from a small rural middle school close to the borders of New Jersey and Pennsylvania
Data Source: Anonymous student survey; guidance logs; discipline reports
Sample Size: 121 students
Age Range: Not specified

Roland, E., Bru, E., Midthassel, U. V., & Vaaland, G. S. (2010). The Zero programme against bullying: Effects of the programme in the context of the Norwegian manifesto against bullying. Social Psychology of Education, 13, 41–55. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver)
Intervention Description: Zero is a schoolwide antibullying program developed by the Centre for Behavioural Research at the University of Stavanger, Norway. It is based on three main principles: a zero vision of bullying, collective commitment among all employees at the school using the program, and continuing work. Based on these principles, the program aims to reduce student bullying by increasing the school's ability to uncover and stop bullying, and eventually to prevent it.
Conclusion: After 12 months of the total 16 months programme period, the overall reduction in the number of pupils being bullied weekly, and more often, was about 25%. This is a substantial but not very strong effect (Smith et al. 2004). Piloting only the class level elements of the Zero programme, Roland and Galloway (2004) reported stronger effects compared to this study. This is in line with research showing that scaling up interventions is a challenge (Elias et al. 2003). While small interventions usually give high control on support given to the school and the fidelity towards the programme is high, this becomes more problematic as the number of participating schools becomes high. The number of schools participating in the Zero programme was indeed high, the schools came from all over the country and the instructors for the schools were set up only a short time before the programme was launched because of a very short time limit given by the Ministry of Education. The general qualifications of these instructors were regarded as good, although the specific competence needed for supporting the schools in implementing the programme varied. Time and opportunity for training before and during the programme period was also limited. Similar to the reduction of bullying among pupils in the schools participating in the Zero programme in 2003–2004, there was a reduction in bullying in the comparison group from 2001 to 2004. At least this was true for the grades 5–7 where there were comparison data. The fact that results indicate a national reduction in bullying is likely due to the national, highly profiled, Manifesto Against Bullying. Furthermore, research by Snyder and Hamilton (2008) has shown that when national campaigns are run successfully, it is hard to obtain additional local effects. Compared to international standards, the level of bullying in Norwegian schools is relatively low, which is also demonstrated by the baseline data in the Zero sample and the national sample. One reason for this may be political, public and professional concern over many years (Olweus 1999b; Olweus and Roland 1983; Roland 2007). Accordingly, Norwegian head teachers and teachers may be better informed about bullying and about efforts to reduce it than colleagues from most other countries. This combination of relatively low prevalence of bullying and fairly strong concern and competence regarding this problem may make it difficult to achieve very strong additional effects from an anti-bullying programme. It is difficult to know whether the Zero sample was different from the national one. The national sample is representative for Norwegian primary schools according to the Norwegian classification system for communities, and the Zero sample is regarded to be quite similar as far as this criterion is concerned. The tendency for the Zero sample to have a lower baseline prevalence of bullying in 2003 compared to the baseline for the SES sample in 2001, may reflect an emerging national effect from the Manifesto for the Zero sample already before the start of the programme, which may have made further improvements hard to achieve for the Zero schools. It is also likely that there is a floor effect and that low scores on the pre test makes it less likely to obtain a significant decrease. Finally, an important difference between the Zero samples and the SES samples is the time span for assessing change, which was only 1 year for the Zero schools.
Study Design: RCT
Setting: Primary schools
Target Audience: Students in Norwegian primary schools
Data Source: Student surveys/questionnaires
Sample Size: 20,466 students from 146 Norwegian primary schools
Age Range: Not specified

Salmivalli, C., Karna, A., & Poskiparta, E. (2011). Counteracting bullying in Finland: The KiVa program and its effects on different forms of being bullied. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 35, 405–411. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Online Material/Education/Blogging, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), CAREGIVER, Educational Material (caregiver), SCHOOL, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media)
Intervention Description: The KiVa Antibullying Program is a school-based program delivered to all students in grades One, Four, and Seven. It was designed for national use in the Finnish comprehensive schools. Its goal is to reduce school bullying and victimization. The central aims of the program are to: Raise awareness of the role that a group plays in maintaining bullying, Increase empathy toward victims, Promote strategies to support the victim and to support children’s self-efficacy to use those strategies, Increase children’s skills in coping when they are victimized
Conclusion: A well-designed, research-based program can thus reduce multiple forms of being bullied, and there might be no need to develop specific programs for different forms of bullying.
Study Design: RCT
Setting: Elementary schools
Target Audience: School children in Finland
Data Source: Student questionnaires
Sample Size: Over 4,000 students in 39 schools
Age Range: Not specified

Sapouna, M., Wolke, D., Vannini, N., Watson, S., Woods, S., Schneider, W., et al. (2010). Virtual learning intervention to reduce bullying victimization in primary school: A controlled trial. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 51(1), 104–112. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), PATIENT/CONSUMER, Online Material/Education/Blogging
Intervention Description: Anti-bullying interventions to date have shown limited success in reducing victimization and have rarely been evaluated using a controlled trial design. This study examined the effects of the FearNot! anti-bullying virtual learning intervention on escaping victimization, and reducing overall victimization rates among primary school students using a nonrandomized controlled trial design. The program was designed to enhance the coping skills of children who are known to be, or are likely to be, victimized.
Conclusion: A virtual learning intervention designed to help children experience effective strategies for dealing with bullying had a short-term effect on escaping victimization for a priori identified victims, and a short-term overall prevention effect for UK children.
Study Design: Quasi-experimental
Setting: Primary schools
Target Audience: School children from 27 primary schools in the UK and Germany
Data Source: The participants were assessed on self-report measures of victimization
Sample Size: 1,129 school children (455 intervention, 487 control)
Age Range: Not specified

Stan, C., & Beldean, I. G. (2014). The development of social and emotional skills of students - Ways to reduce the frequency of bullying-type events. Experimental results. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 114,735-743. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), SCHOOL, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media)
Intervention Description: Based on these observations, our research aims to study the extent to which the development of social and emotional skills of students reduces bullying-type events. In this respect, it was necessary to implement an Anti-Violence Program in schools, based on the "Program Achieve. You Can Do It!" by Bernard (2008) to which a component for parents was added.
Conclusion: Generally, the recorded results were as expected (the frequency of bullying-type behavior, of victimization declined after the intervention and the level of the socio-emotional well-being of the experimental group increased after the intervention). There are still some situations where the results after the intervention, were not as expected (eg the well-being in terms of education decreased after the intervention both in the experimental group as well as the control group). This fact could be explained by the fact that the experimental intervention was conducted over too short a period of time, failing to fully achieve the purpose for which it was developed. Another explanation may be that given by Cowie and Olafsson (2000) who claim that when these interventions are implemented, bullying-type behavior seems to grow due to an increased awareness even if, in reality, there has been no actual propagation of these behaviors. Given the above we believe that through the prospects it opens, this study brings a plus to the job of school counselors and teachers working in secondary schools and experiencing bullying-type problems among students , providing a practical model for intervention in order to improve the quality of interpersonal relations and the educational climate in general.
Study Design: RCT
Setting: Middle schools
Target Audience: Students from two middle-schools from Cluj- Napoca, Romania
Data Source: Questionnaires answered by students
Sample Size: 117 students
Age Range: Not specified

Toner, B. K. (2010). The implementation of the bullying prevention program: Bully proofing your school and its effects on bullying and school climate on sixth grade suburban students. (Doctoral dissertation, Available from the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses database. (UMI No. 3414552)) Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, School Rules, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training
Intervention Description: This study investigated the ability of a comprehensive bully prevention program, Bully Proofing Your School, BPYS, to be effective in reducing bullying in sixth grade (Epstein, Plog, & Porter, 2002; Garrity & Jens, 1997); a grade research agrees with remarkable redundancy to be at greatest risk for school bullying. The BPYS program was selected by the researcher for its stated research-based comprehensive approach; a cultural focus in addressing school bullying from a positive, pro-social perspective with specific focus on school climate; its teacher (user) friendly lessons and cost effectiveness- areas critical to the success and sustainability of a new program (Fekkes, Pijpers, & Verloove-Vanhorick, 2005). Two self-report questionnaires were administered to obtain comprehensive pre and post data regarding bullying, victimization and school climate: The Peer Interactions in Primary School (PIPS) questionnaire (Tarshis & Huffman, 2007) and the Colorado School Climate Survey (CSCS), revised elementary school version (Plog, Epstein, & Porter, 2004). The experimental group received the Bully Proofing Your School (BPYS) intervention following pretest surveys. A quasi-experimental design with both quantitative and qualitative survey data was used in this research. In this study, one hundred forty-nine sixth grade students from two suburban schools who met participation requirements participated in the study.
Conclusion: unable to access
Study Design: Quasi-experimental design with qualitative and quantitative data
Setting: Elementary schools
Target Audience: 6th grade students from suburban schools in New Jersey
Data Source: Questionnaires by students; school records for absenteeism, etc
Sample Size: 58 students
Age Range: Not specified

Waasdorp, T. E., Bradshaw, C. P., & Leaf, P. J. (2012). The impact of schoolwide positive behavioral interventions and supports on bullying and peer rejection. Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, 166(2), 149–156. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, School Rules, Reporting & Response System, CLASSROOM, Enforcement of School Rules, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media), Class Rules, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas
Intervention Description: To build on prior research documenting the impact of School-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS) on school climate and discipline problems to examine the extent to which it affects bullying and peer rejection during the transition into early adolescence.
Conclusion: The results indicated that SWPBIS has a significant effect on teachers' reports of children's involvement in bullying as victims and perpetrators. The findings were considered in light of other outcomes for students, staff, and the school environment, and they suggest that SWPBIS may help address the increasing national concerns related to school bullying by improving school climate.
Study Design: Longitudinal study/Randomized controlled effectiveness trial
Setting: Elementary schools
Target Audience: Students from 37 public elementary schools in Maryland
Data Source: Reports from teachers on bullyingrelated behaviors were assessed through the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation–Checklist (TOCA-C)
Sample Size: 12,334 children (6,614 students from 21 schools in the intervention; 5,124 students from 16 schools in control)
Age Range: Not specified

Williford, A., Boulton, A., Noland, B., Little, T. D., Karna, A., & Salmivalli, C. (2012). Effects of the KiVa anti-bullying program on adolescents' depression, anxiety, and perception of peers. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 40, 289–300. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation
Intervention Description: The KiVa Antibullying Program is a school-based program delivered to all students in grades One, Four, and Seven. It was designed for national use in the Finnish comprehensive schools. Its goal is to reduce school bullying and victimization. The central aims of the program are to: Raise awareness of the role that a group plays in maintaining bullying, Increase empathy toward victims, Promote strategies to support the victim and to support children’s self-efficacy to use those strategies, Increase children’s skills in coping when they are victimized
Conclusion: The present study substantiates and extends prior findings on KiVa. Specifically, the results suggest that KiVa reduced victimization in intervention schools, and may be an effective strategy for retarding negative developmental changes associated with bullying and accelerating positive development. KiVa’s systematic focus on the extended social context in which bullying takes place in combination with its intentional emphasis on the core components of bullying appears to extend prior prevention efforts and to be an appropriate strategy for reducing victimization. Questions remain, however, about the mechanisms by which the intervention impacts particular students and whether KiVa, through these mechanisms, achieves greater effects than other prevention strategies—questions that will be addressed in future research. Notably, KiVa represents an important innovation in the field of bullying prevention that has demonstrated positive effects consistently across several intervention studies (Kärnä et al. 2011; Salmivalli, Garandeau, & Veenstra, under review; Salmivalli, Kärnä, & Poskiparta, under review). Furthermore, the assessment of KiVa’s impact in these studies utilizes advanced analytic methods that address the limitations of previous evaluation studies. The programmatic and methodological sophistication represented by KiVa studies contribute significantly to the field of prevention science and to international anti-bullying efforts.
Study Design: Longitudinal study/ RCT
Setting: Schools
Target Audience: School children in Finland
Data Source: Online questionnaires filled out by students
Sample Size: 429 classrooms of Grade 4-6 students
Age Range: Not specified

Wong, D. S.W., Cheng, C. H. K., Ngan, R. M. H., & Ma, S. K. (2011). Program effectiveness of a restorative whole-school approach for tackling school bullying in Hong Kong. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 55, 846–862. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, School Rules, CLASSROOM, Enforcement of School Rules, Class Rules, PARENT/FAMILY, Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver), YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)
Intervention Description: The present study sets out to address this issue. First, the prevalence of bullying is examined in Hong Kong High Schools, and second, the effectiveness of a Restorative Whole-school Approach (RWsA) in reducing bullying is examined in a quasi-experimental design. The RWsA emphasizes the setting up of restorative goals, clear instructions, team building, and good relationships among students, parents, and teachers. Over the course of 2 years, and across four schools, the effectiveness of this program was observed by comparing an intervention group with a partial intervention group (which did not receive the full treatment) and a control group (which received no treatment whatsoever).
Conclusion: Cannot access
Study Design: Longitudinal study
Setting: High schools
Target Audience: Grade 7 & Grade 9 students in Hong Kong schools
Data Source: Questionnaires by students
Sample Size: 1,480 students
Age Range: Not specified

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.