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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 20 (248 total).

Andreou E, Didaskalou E and Vlachou A (2008) Outcomes of a curriculum-based anti-bullying intervention program on students’ attitudes and behavior. Emotional and Behavior Difficulties 13(4): 235–248.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13632750802442110

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training

Intervention Results:

Within the context of the present study we should note that the magnitude of the program effects was quite small. The positive short-term outcomes were not sustained at the second post-test, which was conducted approximately six months after implementation of the program. At post-test 1, students from the experimental group reported less bullying behavior, had more negative attitudes to bullies, had more positive attitudes to victims, had higher rates of self-efficacy and actually intervened to a greater degree compared with students from the control group. However, at post-test 2 the results indicated no significant interaction effects for all the dependent variables. For both groups the mean scores on all dependent variables did not differ significantly from each other at post-test 2.

Bowllan, N. M. (2011). Implementation and evaluation of a comprehensive, school-wide bullying prevention program in an urban/suburban middle school. Journal of School Health, 81(4), 167–173.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21392008

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Assessment, CLASSROOM, Class Rules, Enforcement of School Rules, SCHOOL, Assembly, School Rules, Teacher/Staff Meeting, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Assessment (patient/consumer), Bullying Committee

Intervention Results:

Statistically significant findings were found for 7th grade female students who received 1 year of the OBPP on reports of prevalence of bullying and exclusion by peers. In contrast, variability in statistical findings was obtained for 8th grade females and no statistical findings were found for males. Following 1 year of the OBPP, teachers reported statistically significant improvements in their capacity to identify bullying, talk to students who bully, and talk with students who are bullied. Although these research findings reflect variability in students’ response to the OBPP intervention by both grade and gender, there are significant positive findings for both students and teachers which suggest that the OBPP has the potential to reduce prevalence rates of bullying and reduce subsequent negative consequences for students while improving the overall school climate.

Brown, E. C., Low, S., Smith, B. H., & Haggerty, K. P. (2011). Outcomes from a school randomized controlled trial of steps to respect: A bullying prevention program. School Psychology Review, 40(3), 423–443.

Link: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2011-25041-006

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, Reporting & Response System, YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling

Intervention Results:

Results of this study demonstrated significant intervention effects for the prevention of school bullying on 50% of all outcomes examined across the three sources of data. Moreover, intervention effects were found for both proximal (self-efficacy, coping skills, etc.) and distal (school environment) outcomes. Most observed intervention effect sizes were relatively small (i.e., less than 0.3); however, effects of this magnitude are not unexpected given the short duration.

Cross, D., Monks, H., Hall, M., Shaw, T., Pintabona, Y., Erceg, E., et al. (2011). Three year results of the Friendly Schools whole-of-school intervention on children's bullying behavior. British Educational Research Journal, 37, 105–129.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01411920903420024

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, Bullying Committee, PARENT/FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Education/Training (caregiver), School Rules

Intervention Results:

Results indicate that intervention students were significantly less likely to observe bullying at 12, 24 and 36 months and be bullied after 12 and 36 months, and significantly more likely to tell if bullied after 12 months than comparison students. No differences were found for self-reported perpetration of bullying. The findings suggest whole-of-school programs that engage students in their different social contexts appear to reduce their experiences of being bullied and increase their likelihood of telling someone if they are bullied. The program appears to be most effective in Grade 4 and possibly Grade 6 but not in Grade 5, and not for bullying of another student. This group of students may require greater support for behavior change through selective and targeted approaches.

Cross, D., Waters, S., Pearce, N., Shaw, T., Hall, M., Erceg, E., et al. (2012). The Friendly Schools Friendly Families programme: Three-year bullying behaviour outcomes in primary school children. International Journal of Educational Research, 53, 394–406.

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0883035512000444

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, School Rules, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Teacher/Staff Training, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Other Education

Intervention Results:

The high intervention was more effective than the moderate and low interventions, with significant positive effects for ‘being bullied’ in the Grades 4 and 6 cohorts, for ‘bullying others’ in the Grade 4 cohort, and the ‘telling if bullied’ in the Grade 6 cohort. Comprehensive whole-school programmes that include capacity building and parental involvement appear to reduce bullying behavior more than programmes without these components.

Domino, M. (2011). The impact of Take the LEAD on school bullying among middle school youth. (Doctoral dissertation, Available from the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses database. (UMI No. 3434870)).

Link: https://search.proquest.com/openview/e8aa06c402754493b262da6429b5d4e9/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=18750&diss=y

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Group Education

Intervention Results:

The data supported that the Take the LEAD intervention did have a significant impact on bullying, victimization, and prosocial behaviors, and the impact on each of these behaviors remained significant after controlling for gender. Reductions in bullying and victimization were significant, and increases in prosocial behaviors were significant in total, and for each subcategory of prosocial behavior under investigation, (a) helping, (b) sharing, (c) empathy, and (d) taking care of others. In addition, reductions in negative behaviors and increases in prosocial behaviors remained statistically significant, even after controlling for gender.

Frey, K. S., Hirschstein, M. K., Edstrom, L. V., & Snell, J. L. (2009). Observed reductions on school bullying, nonbullying aggression, and destructive bystander behavior: A longitudinal evaluation. Journal of Educational Psychology, 101, 466–481.

Link: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2009-04640-018

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, School Rules, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide)

Intervention Results:

Intervention students showed 2-year declines in playground bullying, victimization, nonbullying aggression, destructive bystander, and argumentative behavior. Grade-equivalent contrasts indicated group differences in all problem behaviors. Problem behaviors in the control group increased or remained stable across grades. Intervention group students reported less difficulty responding assertively to bullying compared with control students. Within both groups, older students perceived themselves to be more aggressive and less frequently victimized than younger students. Perceived Bystander Responsibility decreased over time, with significant differences found between pretest and the 12- and 18-month posttests. Perceived Adult Responsiveness regarding bullying problems dropped in the second year. The 12- and 18-month posttests indicated that students perceived adults to be less responsive than at pretest, particularly in the fall of the second year (12-month posttest).

Houlston C and Smith PK (2009) The impact of a peer counseling scheme to address bullying in an all-girl London secondary school: A short-term longitudinal study. British Journal of Educational Psychology 79(1): 69–86

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18435867

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Peer Counselor

Intervention Results:

Peer counsellors benefited from their involvement through an acquisition of transferable communication and interpersonal skills, and, compared to age-matched control pupils, had increased social self-esteem. There were no reductions in self -reported bullying and victimization, but in general pupils believed that there was less bullying in school and that the school was doing more about bullying, with year 7 students showing the most positive changes. Peer-counselling schemes can improve self-esteem of peer supporters, and also impact positively on perceptions of bullying in the school; but impact on actual experiences of bullying is less clear, and there may be problems with the acceptance and use of such programmes by older students.

Jenson, J. M., Dieterich, W. A., Brisson, D., Bender, K. A., & Powell, A. (2010). Preventing childhood bullying: Findings and lessons from the Denver Public Schools trial. Research on Social Work Practice, 20, 509–517.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1049731509359186

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training

Intervention Results:

Results at the end of the study’s intervention period (end of Year 2) revealed significantly lower rates of victimization among YM subjects compared to students in the control group. We did not, however, find a significant difference in rates of bullying between subjects in the experimental and control group schools at the end of Year 2. Bullying behaviors decreased in both groups; the decline was greater in YM schools but was only marginally significant when compared to control group schools. The significant reduction in bully victimization among experimental subjects found at the end of the YM intervention attenuated slightly at 12-month follow-up.

Joronen, K., Konu, A., Rankin, H. S., & Astedt-Kurki, P. (2011). An evaluation of a drama program to enhance social relationships and anti-bullying at elementary school: A controlled study. Health Promotion International, 27, 5–14.

Link: https://academic.oup.com/heapro/article/27/1/5/663869

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Group Education

Intervention Results:

The positive effect on social relationships resulting from the intervention approached statistical significance (p= 0.065). Moreover, the positive effect was found to be statistically significant in the high-intensity intervention classes (p = 0.011). Bullying victimization decreased 20.7 percentage units from pretest (58.8%) to posttest (38.1%) in the intervention group (p < 0.05). The study indicates that using applied drama and theater methods in the classroom may improve children’s social relationships at school.

Krueger, L. M. (2010). The implementation of an anti-bullying program to reduce bullying behaviors on elementary school buses. (Doctoral dissertation, Available from the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses database.)

Link: https://search.proquest.com/openview/f46dd8b9303afffbe699e2e215aeccd7/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=18750&diss=y

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Online Material/Education/Blogging

Intervention Results:

Pretest and posttest data indicated a significant decrease in bullying behaviors for both the control and treatment groups, with the experimental group exhibiting a greater reduction in bullying behaviors than the control group. The results instead seem to show that the anti-bullying intervention had a spillover effect, producing successful reductions in bullying behaviors over time for both groups, though clearly considerably more so for the group that received the intervention than for the control group.

Lishak, N. (2011). Examination of bullying behaviors and the implementation of a social norms project in a middle school. (Doctoral dissertation, Available from the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses database. (UMI No. 3454156))

Link: https://search.proquest.com/docview/868494528/93BFF7C0CDA44FD8PQ/1?accountid=11091

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Assessment, SCHOOL, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media), Assembly, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas

Intervention Results:

Students reported significant increases in bullying across grades 6, 7, and 8; and a significant pre/post decrease in bullying was reported by those students enrolled in the SNP. Implications for social change include the use of these findings as a viable tool in the development of anti-bullying curriculum. Additionally, students can gain a self-awareness of their behavioral choices and the influence their perception of bullying have on those choices.

Roland, E., Bru, E., Midthassel, U. V., & Vaaland, G. S. (2010). The Zero programme against bullying: Effects of the programme in the context of the Norwegian manifesto against bullying. Social Psychology of Education, 13, 41–55.

Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11218-009-9096-0

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The present study shows that bullying was reduced among pupils in the schools participating in the Zero programme. Moreover, National surveys in spring 2001 and spring 2004 showed a reduction in pupils being ictimized in Norway over 3 years. The majority of the schools comprising the 2004 national sample reported a substantial increase in anti-bullying work compared to the three-year period before 2001. After 12 months of the total 16 months programme period, the overall reduction in the number of pupils being bullied weekly, and more often, was about 25%.

Salmivalli, C., Karna, A., & Poskiparta, E. (2011). Counteracting bullying in Finland: The KiVa program and its effects on different forms of being bullied. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 35, 405–411.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0165025411407457

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Online Material/Education/Blogging, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), CAREGIVER, Educational Material (caregiver), SCHOOL, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media)

Intervention Results:

All forms of being bullied decreased in intervention schools (percentage changes negative), whereas in control schools, most of them increased. Self-reported victimization reports decreased. It was found that KiVa had an effect on peer-reported victimization as well—that effect was even larger than the one based on self-reports. Not only did students like school more and perceive the classroom and school climate more positively after the intervention, but they also reported a higher motivation to learn and even felt that they were performing better. Importantly, these effects were not only observed among students whose individual victimization levels went down, but among other children as well: in other words, the positive effects of KiVa are not limited to, and not necessarily even mediated by, reductions of being bullied.

Sapouna, M., Wolke, D., Vannini, N., Watson, S., Woods, S., Schneider, W., et al. (2010). Virtual learning intervention to reduce bullying victimization in primary school: A controlled trial. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 51(1), 104–112.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19703096

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), PATIENT/CONSUMER, Online Material/Education/Blogging

Intervention Results:

Across all time periods, there were fewer victims among the intervention group children compared with controls, but the difference was only statistically significant at the first follow-up. Both groups reported similar rates of bullying perpetration at all time points. UK and German children experienced similar rates of victimization. There was a significantly higher number of bullies among UK children than German children. Teachers in both countries reported problems with the software, and most German teachers considered it poor.

Stan, C., & Beldean, I. G. (2014). The development of social and emotional skills of students - Ways to reduce the frequency of bullying-type events. Experimental results. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 114,735-743.

Link: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Cristian_Stan2/publication/273851529_The_Development_of_Social_and_Emotional_Skills_of_Students-ways_to_Reduce_the_Frequency_of_Bullying-type_Events_Experimental_Results/links/56b4662208ae1f8aa4542bc1.pdf

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), SCHOOL, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media)

Intervention Results:

Comparing the results of the pretest stage with the data from the posttest stage indicates a significant reduction in violence among the students in the experimental group compared to the control group. The socio-emotional well-being status improved after the intervention, for students at the school where the Anti-Bullying Program was implemented, especially from an emotional point of view compared to students from the school where this program was not applied. No significant involvement of the “family” (parents) external factor was achieved in the development of the social and emotional skills of their children.

Toner, B. K. (2010). The implementation of the bullying prevention program: Bully proofing your school and its effects on bullying and school climate on sixth grade suburban students. (Doctoral dissertation, Available from the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses database. (UMI No. 3414552))

Link: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED521861

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, School Rules, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training

Intervention Results:

With regard to BPYS intervention on school climate, while there was a significant difference across time (pre-test to posttest) with regard to school climate, both groups actually increased in school climate and were not significantly different from one another when looking at time (pre-test to posttest) by group (experimental vs. control). There was a dip in victimization in the experimental group from pretest to posttest. However, the dip was not statistically significant. Bullying did decrease significantly from pretest to posttest in the control group, but did not significantly differ from pretest to posttest in the experimental group. (The control school experienced a significant bullying event shortly before the study began, and the administration there began to take measures to combat bullying behavior.) Results revealed the percentage for student absenteeism was the same in both schools in September to March, but declined in the control school by the end of the school year in June, rising slightly in the experimental school.

Waasdorp, T. E., Bradshaw, C. P., & Leaf, P. J. (2012). The impact of schoolwide positive behavioral interventions and supports on bullying and peer rejection. Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, 166(2), 149–156.

Link: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/1107694

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, School Rules, Reporting & Response System, CLASSROOM, Enforcement of School Rules, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media), Class Rules, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas

Intervention Results:

Analyses indicated that children in schools that implemented SWPBIS displayed lower rates of teacher reported bullying and peer rejection than those in schools without SWPBIS. A significant interaction also emerged between grade level of first exposure to SWPBIS and intervention status, suggesting that the effects of SWPBIS on rejection were strongest among children who were first exposed to SWPBIS at a younger age. SWPBIS may help address the increasing national concerns related to school bullying by improving school climate.

Williford, A., Boulton, A., Noland, B., Little, T. D., Karna, A., & Salmivalli, C. (2012). Effects of the KiVa anti-bullying program on adolescents' depression, anxiety, and perception of peers. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 40, 289–300.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21822630

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation

Intervention Results:

The KiVa program is effective for reducing students’ internalizing problems and improving their peer group perceptions. Finally, changes in anxiety, depression, and positive peer perceptions were found to be predicted by reductions in victimization.

Wong, D. S.W., Cheng, C. H. K., Ngan, R. M. H., & Ma, S. K. (2011). Program effectiveness of a restorative whole-school approach for tackling school bullying in Hong Kong. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 55, 846–862.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20639403

NPM: 7-2: Child Safety/Injury (10-17 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, School Rules, CLASSROOM, Enforcement of School Rules, Class Rules, PARENT/FAMILY, Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver), YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The group that received the RWsA treatment exhibited a significant reduction of bullying, higher empathic attitudes, and higher self-esteem in comparison to the partial intervention and the control group. The present action research project shows a significant reduction of bullying behavior, and an increase in empathic attitudes in the intervention group as compared to the control group. Bearing in mind that a heightened awareness of bullying and bullying behavior amongst students might have led to an elevation in levels of reporting, the finding of a reduction in bullying in the current study confirms that the full implementation of RWsA can be effective.
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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.