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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 20 (45 total).

Cross, D., Waters, S., Pearce, N., Shaw, T., Hall, M., Erceg, E., et al. (2012). The Friendly Schools Friendly Families programme: Three-year bullying behaviour outcomes in primary school children. International Journal of Educational Research, 53, 394–406.

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0883035512000444?via%3Dihub

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, School Rules, Teacher/Staff Training, PARENT/FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Motivational Interviewing, Other Education

Intervention Results:

The baseline values for the outcome variables are presented for the Grades 4 and 6 cohorts in Table 5. The frequencies of being bullied and telling if bullied were equivalent for each of the study conditions at baseline. Whilst similar percentages of students in the Grade 4 cohort in the high to low groups reported they had bullied others, differences existed at baseline in the Grade 6 cohort (x2 (4, n = 1248) = 11.7, p = .020). Students in the low group at baseline were less likely to report having bullied others (3% had bullied others frequently (every few weeks or more often) compared with 8% and 7% of the high and moderate groups respectively). Group effects were found for the Grade 4 cohort (Table 6) at posttest 1 (p = .004) (i.e., at the end of the first year of the intervention). At posttest 1, students in the low group were 1.8 times more likely to be bullied frequently than those in the high group (OR = 1.76, effect size ES = .31). Whilst not significant at the Bonferroni adjusted level of .025, the Grade 4 low group compared to the high group were 1.4 times more likely at posttest 2 (OR = 1.39, p = .039, ES = .18) and 1.6 times more likely at posttest 3 (OR = 1.64, p = .026, ES = .27) to be bullied than not at all. Similarly, for the Grade 6 cohort, the high group was also less likely to be bullied at the first and the second posttest measurement. In particular, at the end of Grade 6 the low group was 1.5 times more likely (OR = 1.54, p = .005, ES = .24) than the high group to be bullied than not at all, and had 1.5 times greater odds (OR = 1.48, p = .047, ES = .22) of being bullied frequently than the high group, although this was not significant at the Bonferroni adjusted level of .025. After two years of the intervention (when the students were in Grade 7), the moderate group were more than twice as likely (OR = 2.13, p = .011, ES = .42) to be bullied frequently when compared with the high group. Based on students’ self-report of how often they bullied others in the previous term, intervention effects were observed for the Grade 4 but not the Grade 6 cohort (Table 7). For the Grade 4 cohort, at the end of Grade 5 (p = .014) and at the end of Grade 6 (p = .021), the high group were less likely to report they bullied others. In particular, the moderate group had higher odds of bullying others frequently at the end of Grade 5 (OR = 2.79, ES = .57), and the low group had higher odds of bullying others at the end of Grade 6 (OR = 1.74, ES = .31) than did the high group. One of the objectives of the intervention was to encourage students to seek help by speaking to someone if they were bullied. Whilst no significant intervention effects were found for the Grade 4 cohort, differences were observed for the Grade 6 cohort. As shown in Table 8, at the end of the first study year, the Grade 6 students in the low group were approximately 1.6 times more likely than the high group to report not telling anyone if they were bullied (OR = 1.56, p = .015, ES = .25). At the end of the second year ofthe study (when the students were in their final year of primary school, Grade 7), the students in the low group were even less likely to tell if they were bullied, than those in the high group (OR = 1.78, p = .003, ES = .32). The moderate and low intervention groups were also compared for each of the outcome variables (results not given) and no statistically significant differences were found for either the Grade 4 or the Grade 6 cohort. The implementation of the school level, classroom level and family level components of this intervention were measured using multiple sources in each of the three study years to avoid Type III error. Our process data show the average percentage of the intervention implemented by the high and moderate groups at the school level was about 63%, with 55% of the classroom intervention implemented, and 22% ofthe family intervention implemented in students’ homes by the high group. A detailed explanation of these process data is beyond the scope of this paper and will be reported elsewhere.

Ahlers-Schmidt, C. R., Schunn, C., Dempsy, M., & Blackon, S. (2014-A). Evaluation of community baby showers to promote safe sleep. Kansas Journal of Medicine, 7, 1–5.

Link: https://journals.ku.edu/kjm/article/view/11476

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Provision of Safe Sleep Item

Intervention Results:

The majority were African American (61%) with a high school diploma or less schooling (63%). Nearly all (97%) planned to place their baby supine for sleep. However, less than half (47%) planned to have the baby sleep in the parents’ room in a separate crib. Attendees exhibited high levels of safe sleep knowledge, stated intentions to utilize most safe sleep recommendations, and reported babies would have slept in unsafe environments without the portable crib.

Goodstein, M. H., Bell, T., & Krugman, S. D. (2015). Improving infant sleep safety through a comprehensive hospital-based program. Clinical Pediatrics, 54(3), 212–221.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0009922814566928

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): HOSPITAL, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Sleep Environment Modification, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Educational Material (Provider), Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, Guideline Change and Implementation

Intervention Results:

There were 1092 HD and 490 F/U surveys. Supine sleep knowledge was 99.8% at HD; 94.8% of families planned to always use this position. At F/U, 97.3% retained supine knowledge, and 84.9% maintained this position exclusively (P < .01). Knowledge of crib as safest surface was 99.8% at HD and 99.5% F/U. Use in the parents’ room fell to 91.9% (HD) and 68.2% (F/U). Reinforcing the infant safe sleep message with an intensive hospital-based education program improves parental intentions to comply with the American Academy of Pediatrics’ SIDS risk-reduction guidelines in the home, including supine sleep position, use of a crib without extraneous materials, and appropriate room temperature.

Hendrickson, S. G., Williams, J., & Acee, T. W. (2008). Immigrant Hispanic mothers’ participation in a dual-site safety intervention. Hispanic Health Care International, 6(2), 71–79.

Link: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/233631083_Immigrant_Hispanic_Mothers'_Participation_in_a_Dual-Site_Safety_Intervention

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Home Visits, CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family), PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Community Health Workers (CHWs), Educational Material, Other Person-to-Person Education

Intervention Results:

Results suggest the intervention likely reduced maternal depression and that maternal worry may be a previously undiscovered home safety barrier.

Kendrick D., Mulvaney C., Watson M. (2009b). Does targeting injury prevention towards families in disadvantaged areas reduce inequalities in safety practices?, Health Education Research. 24:32-41.

Link: https://academic.oup.com/her/article/24/1/32/592460

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Consultation (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Assessment (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The intervention significantly reduced inequalities in stair gate use by housing tenure (P 5 0.006) and receipt of benefits (P 5 0.04), but did not reduce inequalities in functioning smoke alarms. We conclude that a home safety intervention targeted at deprived areas addressing the barriers of cost and needing help to fit equipment was only partly successful in reducing inequalities in safety practices.

Phelan, K.J., Khoury, J., Xu, Y., Liddy, S., Hornung, R., & Lanphear, B.P. (2011). A randomized controlled trial of home injury hazard reduction: The HOME injury study. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 165(4), 339-345.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3693223/

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Educational Material (caregiver), Consultation (Parent/Family), Education/Training (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The mean age of the children at intervention was 6 months. Injury hazards were significantly reduced in the intervention but not in control group homes at one and two years (p<0.004). There was not a significant difference in the rate for all medically-attended injuries in intervention compared with control group children, 14.3 (95%CI 9.7, 21.1) vs. 20.8 (14.4, 29.9) per 100 child-years (p=0.17) respectively; but there was a significant reduction in modifiable medically attended injuries in intervention compared with control group children, 2.3 (1.0, 5.5) vs. 7.7 (4.2, 14.2) per 100 child-years, respectively (p=0.026).

Stewart, T, Clark, A, Gilliland, J, Miller, M, Edwards, J, Haidar, T et al. (2016). Home safe home: evaluation of a childhood home safety program. J Trauma Acute Care Surg, 81 (2016), pp. 533-540.

Link: https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/876a/e285fbc2c87867fe3ed385fb783346e1e69f.pdf

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The time series analysis demonstrated a significant decline in ED visits for home injuries in toddlers younger than 2 years of age after HSP implementation. The declines in ED visits for home injuries remained significant over and above each socioeconomic status covariate.

Swart L, van Niekerk A, Seedat M, Jordaan E. 2008. Paraprofessional home visitation program to prevent childhood unintentional injuries in low-income communities: a cluster randomised controlled trial. Injury Prevention 14 (3), 164-169.

Link: https://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/14/3/164

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Assessment (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Significant reductions were found for injury risks related to burn safety practices. For injury risks related to electrical burns, paraffin burns, and poisoning, a decline was also noted although this was not statistically significant. No decline was noted for fall-related risks.

van Beelen, M,  Beirens, T,  den Hertog, P,  van Beeck, E,  Raat, H (2014). Effectiveness of web-based tailored advice on parents’ child safety behaviors: randomized controlled trial. J Med Internet Res, 16 (2014), p. e17.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3913924/

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Counseling (Parent/Family), Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Assessment (caregiver), Motivational Interviewing/Counseling

Intervention Results:

At follow-up, parents in the intervention condition showed significantly less unsafe behavior compared to parents in the control condition.

Duchossois, GP, Nance, ML, Garcia-Espana, JF, & Flores, J. (2009). Sustainability of an in-home fire prevention intervention. Journal of Trauma Nursing, 16(4), 194–200.

Link: https://journals.lww.com/journaloftraumanursing/Fulltext/2009/10000/Sustainability_of_an_In_Home_Fire_Prevention.5.aspx

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, Training (Parent/Family), Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The implementation of an in-home visit to educate parents of third- and fourth grade students on escape planning coupled with the installation of smoke alarms can be successful in increasing basic fire safety knowledge and household fire safety practices.

Carlsson, A, Bramhagen, A, Jansson, A, Dykes, A. (2011). Precautions taken by mothers to prevent burn and scald injuries to young children at home: an intervention study. Scan J Public Health, 2011; 39:471-478.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21511874

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Home Visit (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The results showed that the intervention had a significant impact on improving the precautions the participating mothers introduced to protect their children against burn and scald injuries in the home and further, in relation to a comparison group.

Kendrick D, Stewart J, Smith S, Coupland C, Hopkins N, Groom L, et al. (2011). Randomised controlled trial of thermostatic mixer valves in reducing bath hot tap water temperature in families with young children in social housing. Archives of Disease in Childhood 2011;96:232–9.

Link: https://adc.bmj.com/content/96/3/232.long

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family), Consultation (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Intervention arm families had a significantly lower bath hot water temperature at 3-month and 12-month follow-up than families in the control arm. They were significantly more likely to be happy or very happy with their bath hot water temperature, significantly less likely to report the temperature as being too hot, and significantly less likely to report checking the temperature of every bath. 15% of intervention arm families reported problems with their TMV.

Yang J, Peek-Asa C, Jones MP, Nordstrom DL, Taylor C, Young TL, Zwerling C. (2008). Smoke alarms by type and battery life in rural households. A randomized controlled trial. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2008;35(1):20–4.

Link: https://europepmc.org/article/med/18482822

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

No difference was observed in alarm function between photoelectric alarms and ionizing alarms 12 months after installation (OR=1.30, 95% CI=0.88, 1.92). However, photoelectric alarms had significantly lower odds of false alarms than ionizing alarms. Alarms with lithium batteries had 91% higher odds of functioning than those with carbon-zinc batteries. The main reasons for nonfunctioning included a missing battery (30.7%); a missing alarm (28%); and a disconnected battery (11.3%).

Beattie, N., Shaw, P., & Larson, A. (2008). Water safety in the bush: Strategies for addressing training needs in remote areas. Rural and Remote Health, 8(2), 855–865.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18498202

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), COMMUNITY, Community Health Services Policy, STATE, Collaboration with Local Agencies (State), Other (Communities), Training

Intervention Results:

Flexibility was the major success factor. Within the parameters of minimum guidelines, communities were encouraged to choose the timing, venue and delivery mode of the training to ensure the program was best suited to the local community. Community ownership was achieved by requiring that local organisations design and implement the projects. Designing programs that addressed local constraints ensured high participation rates. A number of challenges were also identified. Not all community organisations had the capacity to take on the coordinating role, and struggled to effectively deliver a sustainable program. Other models may be needed for these communities. Accessing appropriately qualified water safety instructors in local areas also proved difficult at several of the sites. Further, designing standardised outcome evaluation strategies that could be implemented across all participating sites was problematic.

Callaghan, J., Hyder, A., Khan, R., Blum, L., Arifeen, S., & Baqui, A. H. (2010). Child supervision practices for drowning prevention in rural Bangladesh: A pilot study of supervision tools. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 64(7), 645–647.

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20547700/

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Community Health Workers (CHWs), COMMUNITY, Outreach, CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Assessment (caregiver), PARENT/FAMILY, Consultation (Parent/Family), Training (Parent/Family), Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Statistical analysis of 2694 observations revealed that children were directly supervised or protected by a preventive tool in 96% of visits. Households with a supervision tool had a significantly lower proportion of observations with the child unsupervised and unprotected than households without a tool. Families that received a playpen had 6.89 times the odds of using it at the time of the visit than families that received a door barrier.

Cowan, S.,Pease, A.,& Bennett, S.(2013). Usage and impact of an online education tool for preventing sudden unexpected death in infancy. Journal of Paediatric and Child Health, 49(3), 228–232.

Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jpc.12128

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family)

Intervention Results:

After using the e-learning tool, increased confidence ratings were high (7–9/9) for 68.7% of participants. The online tool extended education opportunities beyond the traditional face-to-face delivery mode. It enabled large numbers of people from across health and community roles to be aligned in understanding and action for preventing sudden infant death, resulting in their increased confidence to discuss infant safety with families.

Hesselink, A. E., van Poppel, M. N., van Eijsden, M., Twisk, J. J., & van der Wal, M. F. (2012). The effectiveness of a perinatal education programme on smoking, infant care, and psychosocial health for ethnic Turkish women. Midwifery, 28(3), 306–313.

Link: https://europepmc.org/article/med/21632158

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Home Visit (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

This evaluation showed that the HMHB antenatal education program is able improve knowledge about smoking, intention to engage in SIDS prevention, and short-term SIDS prevention behavior in first- and second-generation ethnic minority women, who are normally difficult to reach and rarely attend antenatal programs. However, no explicit intervention effect was found on smoking, long-term SIDS prevention, smothering, slapping and shaking, depression and parent–child attachment.

Anderson SW, Moore PA (2008). The impact of education and school-based counseling on children's and adolescents' views of substance abuse. Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse 2008;18(1): 16–23.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15470650802526526

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, PARENT/FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Results indicated that preexisting views significantly differed from post-intervention views, and that the Life Skills Training Program provided participants with a more accurate view of substance abuse.

Akai, C. E., Guttentag, C. L., Baggett, K. M., & Noria, C. W. (2008). Enhancing parenting practices of at-risk mothers. Journal of Primary Prevention, 29, 223–242.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6060617/

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Home Visit (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Treatment mothers provided more parental support indicated by higher quality verbalizations, more demonstrative teaching, and lower role-reversal tendencies.

Casanueva, C., Martin, S. L., Runyan, D. K., Barth, R. P., & Bradly, R. H. (2008). Parenting services for mothers involved with child protective services: Do they change maternal parenting and spanking behaviors with young children? Children and Youth Services Review, 30, 861–878.

Link: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2008-08638-003

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Mixed Evidence. This study found some modest benefits in maternal responsiveness and total parenting scores for mothers of 3- to 5-year-old children when these mothers received parenting services, as compared with mothers that did not receive parenting services. However, these findings could not be confirmed with multivariate analysis.
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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.