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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 3 (3 total).

Pearn, J., Nixon, J., Franklin, R., & Wallis, B. (2008). Safety legislation, public health policy and drowning prevention. International Journal of Injury Control and Safety Promotion, 15(2), 122–123.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17457300802150587

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): STATE, Policy/Guideline (State)

Intervention Results:

It states that the drowning death rates of young children, aging 0-4 years old, had decreased after the introduction of safety legislation. The study has shown that the drowning incidents of young children will continue to reduce with the introduction of safety legislation and enforced compliance, in combination with education for safety and ongoing advocacy.

Wesson DE, Stephens D, Lam K, Parsons D, Spence L, Parkin PC. Trends in pediatric and adult bicycling deaths before and after passage of a bicycle helmet law. Pediatrics 2008;122: 605–10.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18762532

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): STATE, Policy/Guideline (State), NATIONAL, Policy/Guideline (National)

Intervention Results:

There were 362 bicycle-related deaths in the 12-year period (1–15 years: 107 deaths; >16 years: 255 deaths). For bicyclists 1 to 15 years of age, the average number of deaths per year decreased 52%, the mortality rate per 100,000 person-years decreased 55%, and the time series analysis demonstrated a significant reduction in deaths after legislation. The estimated change in the number of deaths per month was 0.59 deaths per month. For bicyclists >16 years of age, there were only slight changes in the average number of deaths per year and the mortality rate per 100,000 person-years, and the time series analysis demonstrated no significant change in deaths after legislation.

DiMaggio C, Li G. Effectiveness of a safe routes to school program in preventing school-aged pedestrian injury. Pediatrics 2013;131: 290-6.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3557410/

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): NATIONAL, Policy/Guideline (National), COMMUNITY, Other (Communities), STATE, Policy/Guideline (State)

Intervention Results:

During the study period, the annual rate of pedestrian injury decreased 33% among school aged children (5- to 19-year-olds) and 14% in other age groups. The annual rate of school-aged pedestrian injury during school-travel hours decreased 44% from 8.0 injuries per 10000 population in the preintervention period (2001–2008) to 4.4 injuries per 10000 population in the post intervention period (2009– 2010) in census tracts with SRTS interventions. The rate remained virtually unchanged in census tracts without SRTS interventions.
   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.