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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 20 (43 total).

Hendrickson, S. G., Williams, J., & Acee, T. W. (2008). Immigrant Hispanic mothers’ participation in a dual-site safety intervention. Hispanic Health Care International, 6(2), 71–79.

Link: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/233631083_Immigrant_Hispanic_Mothers'_Participation_in_a_Dual-Site_Safety_Intervention

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Home Visits, CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family), PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Community Health Workers (CHWs), Educational Material, Other Person-to-Person Education

Intervention Results:

Results suggest the intervention likely reduced maternal depression and that maternal worry may be a previously undiscovered home safety barrier.

Odendaal, W., van Niekerk, A., Jordaan, E., & Seedat, M. (2009). The impact of a home visitation programme on household hazards associated with unintentional childhood injuries: A randomised controlled trial. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 41(1), 183-190.

Link: http://europepmc.org/article/med/19114153

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

A significant reduction was observed in the hazards associated with electrical and paraffin appliances, as well as in hazards related to poisoning. Non-significant changes were observed for burn safety household practices and fall injury hazards.tivity by caregivers, and a more cohesive visitor team.

Swart L, van Niekerk A, Seedat M, Jordaan E. 2008. Paraprofessional home visitation program to prevent childhood unintentional injuries in low-income communities: a cluster randomised controlled trial. Injury Prevention 14 (3), 164-169.

Link: https://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/14/3/164

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Assessment (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Significant reductions were found for injury risks related to burn safety practices. For injury risks related to electrical burns, paraffin burns, and poisoning, a decline was also noted although this was not statistically significant. No decline was noted for fall-related risks.

Duchossois, GP, Nance, ML, Garcia-Espana, JF, & Flores, J. (2009). Sustainability of an in-home fire prevention intervention. Journal of Trauma Nursing, 16(4), 194–200.

Link: https://journals.lww.com/journaloftraumanursing/Fulltext/2009/10000/Sustainability_of_an_In_Home_Fire_Prevention.5.aspx

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, Training (Parent/Family), Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The implementation of an in-home visit to educate parents of third- and fourth grade students on escape planning coupled with the installation of smoke alarms can be successful in increasing basic fire safety knowledge and household fire safety practices.

Carlsson, A, Bramhagen, A, Jansson, A, Dykes, A. (2011). Precautions taken by mothers to prevent burn and scald injuries to young children at home: an intervention study. Scan J Public Health, 2011; 39:471-478.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21511874

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Home Visit (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The results showed that the intervention had a significant impact on improving the precautions the participating mothers introduced to protect their children against burn and scald injuries in the home and further, in relation to a comparison group.

Kendrick D, Stewart J, Smith S, Coupland C, Hopkins N, Groom L, et al. (2011). Randomised controlled trial of thermostatic mixer valves in reducing bath hot tap water temperature in families with young children in social housing. Archives of Disease in Childhood 2011;96:232–9.

Link: https://adc.bmj.com/content/96/3/232.long

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family), Consultation (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Intervention arm families had a significantly lower bath hot water temperature at 3-month and 12-month follow-up than families in the control arm. They were significantly more likely to be happy or very happy with their bath hot water temperature, significantly less likely to report the temperature as being too hot, and significantly less likely to report checking the temperature of every bath. 15% of intervention arm families reported problems with their TMV.

Callaghan, J., Hyder, A., Khan, R., Blum, L., Arifeen, S., & Baqui, A. H. (2010). Child supervision practices for drowning prevention in rural Bangladesh: A pilot study of supervision tools. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 64(7), 645–647.

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20547700/

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Community Health Workers (CHWs), COMMUNITY, Outreach, CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Assessment (caregiver), PARENT/FAMILY, Consultation (Parent/Family), Training (Parent/Family), Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Statistical analysis of 2694 observations revealed that children were directly supervised or protected by a preventive tool in 96% of visits. Households with a supervision tool had a significantly lower proportion of observations with the child unsupervised and unprotected than households without a tool. Families that received a playpen had 6.89 times the odds of using it at the time of the visit than families that received a door barrier.

Hesselink, A. E., van Poppel, M. N., van Eijsden, M., Twisk, J. J., & van der Wal, M. F. (2012). The effectiveness of a perinatal education programme on smoking, infant care, and psychosocial health for ethnic Turkish women. Midwifery, 28(3), 306–313.

Link: https://europepmc.org/article/med/21632158

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Home Visit (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

This evaluation showed that the HMHB antenatal education program is able improve knowledge about smoking, intention to engage in SIDS prevention, and short-term SIDS prevention behavior in first- and second-generation ethnic minority women, who are normally difficult to reach and rarely attend antenatal programs. However, no explicit intervention effect was found on smoking, long-term SIDS prevention, smothering, slapping and shaking, depression and parent–child attachment.

Akai, C. E., Guttentag, C. L., Baggett, K. M., & Noria, C. W. (2008). Enhancing parenting practices of at-risk mothers. Journal of Primary Prevention, 29, 223–242.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6060617/

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Home Visit (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Treatment mothers provided more parental support indicated by higher quality verbalizations, more demonstrative teaching, and lower role-reversal tendencies.

Aracena, M., Krause, M., Pérez, C., Méndez, M. J., Salvatierra, L., Soto, M., et al. (2009). A cost-effectiveness evaluation of a home visit program for adolescent mothers. Journal of Health Psychology, 14, 878–887.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19786514

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Home Visits, Midwife, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Results show higher scores for the intervention group on the mothers’ mental health and nutritional state, as well as on the children’s levels of linguistic development.

Asscher, J. J., Hermanns, J., & Deković, M. (2008). Effectiveness of the home-start parenting support program: Behavioral outcomes for parents and children. Infant Mental Health Journal, 29, 95–113.

Link: https://www.home-start.nl/documenten/Onderzoek%20publicaties%20artikelen/2008%20Effectiveness%20of%20the%20Home-Start%20program.pdf

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Consultation (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Outreach (caregiver), Motivational Interviewing/Counseling

Intervention Results:

The results showed a significant improvement in perceived parenting competence, but no effects on maternal depressive moods. Mixed results were found for parenting behavior: Parental consistency and observed sensitivity improved significantly in the Home-Start group whereas no effects were found on the other parenting variables.

Bugental DB, Schwartz A. A cognitive approach to child mistreatment prevention among medically at-risk infants. Dev Psychol. 2009;45:284–8.

Link: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2008-19282-018

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), PARENT/FAMILY, Consultation (Parent/Family)

Intervention Results:

Moderate Evidence. In the HV+ condition, results showed (a) a lower use of corporal punishment, (b) greater safety maintenance in the home, and (c) fewer reported child injuries.

Dew B, Breakey GF. An evaluation of Hawaii’s Healthy Start Program using child abuse hospitalization data. Journal of Family Violence. 2014;29:893–900.

Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10896-014-9642-1

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Assessment (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Among the 1,738 served by home visitors, there were five hospitalized cases of child maltreatment; among the 2,278 families not served, there were 34 cases.

Donohue B, Azrin NH, Bradshaw K, Van Hasselt VB, Cross CL, Urgelles J, et al. A controlled evaluation of Family Behavior Therapy in concurrent child neglect and drug abuse. Journal of Consult Clinical Psychology. 2014;82:706–720.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4329246/

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Post hoc analyses indicated that FBT mothers of non-drug-exposed children reduced their child maltreatment potential more than FBT mothers of drug-exposed children and TAU mothers (p < .05). The results of this study suggest family-based behavioral treatments are justified for use in this very difficult to treat population.

DuMont K, Mitchell-Herzfeld S, Greene R, Lee E, Lowenfels A, Rodriguez M, et al. Healthy Families New York (HFNY) randomized trial: Effects on early child abuse and neglect. Child Abuse Negl. 2008;32:295–315.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18377991

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

HFNY mothers reported committing one-quarter as many acts of serious abuse at age 2 as control mothers (p < .05). At age 2, young, first-time mothers in the HFNY group who were randomly assigned at 30 weeks of pregnancy or less were less likely than counterparts in the control group to engage in minor physical aggression in the past year (51% versus 70%) and harsh parenting in the past week (41% versus 62%). Among women who were “psychologically vulnerable,” HFNY mothers were one-quarter as likely to report engaging in serious abuse and neglect as control mothers (5% versus 19%) at age 2.

DuMont, K., Kirkland, K., Mitchell-Herzfeld, S., Ehrhard-Dietzel, S., Rodriguez, M. L., Lee, E., et al. (2011). A randomized trial of Healthy Families New York (HFNY): Does home visiting prevent child maltreatment. Verkregen van https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/232945.pdf

Link: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/232945.pdf

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Consistent with prior findings, HFNY mothers used serious physical abuse less frequently (p<.01) than mothers in the control group, and used non-violent discipline strategies more frequently (p <.05). Target children also reported lower rates of minor physical aggression for HFNY mothers (70.8% versus 77.2%, p<.05). HFNY also produced unexpected differences in rates of subsequent confirmed reports for HFNY mothers in the RRO subgroup (e.g. women who had at least one prior CPS report). As compared to their counterparts in the control group, HFNY mothers had lower rates of confirmed CPS reports for any type of abuse or neglect: (41.5% versus 60.4%, p<.10); and lower rates of preventive, protective, and placement services initiating: (38.02 versus 60.02, p<.05). Findings also suggest that intensive planning services had an affect in that delayed or averted births were linked to reductions in subsequent CPS reports.

Easterbrooks, M. A., Jacobs, F. H., Bartlett, J. D., Goldberg, J., Contreras, M. M., Kotake, C., et al. (2012). Initial findings from a randomized, controlled trial of Healthy Families Massachusetts: Early program impacts on young mothers’ parenting. Verkregen van http://www.aws.pewtrusts.org/~/media/legacy/uploadedfiles/pcs_assets/2013/healthyfamiliesmassachusettsreportpdf.pdf

Link: https://www.pewtrusts.org/~/media/legacy/uploadedfiles/pcs_assets/2013/healthyfamiliesmassachusettsreportpdf.pdf

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Outreach (caregiver), Motivational Interviewing/Counseling, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, Training (Parent/Family)

Intervention Results:

Participants who used more program services—remaining in the program longer, and completing more home visits—had children with fewer reports of maltreatment than did those who were less engaged in the program. On the other hand, the data comparing the HVS and RIO groups indicated that the HVS group had more maltreatment. These findings suggest that, although being enrolled in the program predicted more substantiated maltreatment reports overall, those mothers who remained engaged with the program were less likely to be among those cases.

Falconer, M. K., Clark, M. H., & Parris, D. (2011). Validity in an evaluation of Healthy Families Florida—A program to prevent child abuse and neglect. Children and Youth Services Review, 33, 66–77.

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740910002549?via%3Dihub

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

After applying a variety of statistical adjustments to reduce selection bias, we found that the outcomes favored the home visiting program and increased after accounting for covariates that contributed to child abuse and neglect. This was true across the statistical techniques (traditional covariate and propensity score adjustment) used.

Fergusson DM, Boden JM, Horwood LJ. Nine-year follow-up of a home-visitation program: A randomized trial. Pediatrics. 2013;131:297–303.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23359575

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Comparisons between the Early Start and control series showed that families in the Early Start program showed significant (P < .05) benefits in reduced risk of hospital attendance for unintentional injury, lower risk of parent-reported harsh punishment, lower levels of physical punishment, higher parenting competence scores, and more positive child behavioral adjustment scores. Effect sizes (Cohen's "d") ranged from 0.13 to 0.29 (median = 0.25). There were no significant differences (all P values > .05) between the Early Start and control series on a range of measures of parental behavior and family outcomes, including maternal depression, parental substance use, intimate partner violence, adverse economic outcomes, and life stress.

Galanter R, Self-Brown S, Valente RR, Dorsey S, Whitaker DJ, Bertuglia-Haley M, et al. Effectiveness of Parent–Child Interaction Therapy delivered to at-risk families in the home setting. Child & Family Behavior Therapy. 2012;34:177–196.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07317107.2012.707079

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Motivational Interviewing/Counseling

Intervention Results:

Results indicated significant positive changes in child/parent behavior and parent attitudes for dyad completers. Overall, parents who completed in-home PCIT reported significantly more positive child outcomes than noncompleters and had a significantly lower risk of child abuse.
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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.