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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 3 (3 total).

Bulzacchelli MT, Gielen AC, Shields WC, McDonald EM, Frattaroli S. (2009) Parental safety-related knowledge and practices associated with visiting a mobile safety center in a low income urban population. Family and Community Health 2009;32(2):147–58.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19305213

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, COMMUNITY, Community Events, Outreach, Presentation, Visual Display (Community), Visual Display (Hospital), Distribution of Promotional Items (Classroom/School), Distribution of Promotional Items (Community)

Intervention Results:

At follow-up, MSC visitors scored slightly higher on a knowledge test than nonvisitors and improved more in reported car safety seat use, but did not differ in observed safety product use.

Fujiwara, T., Kato, N., & Sanders, M. R. (2011). Effectiveness of Group Positive Parenting Program (Triple P) in changing child behavior, parenting style, and parental adjustment: An intervention study in Japan. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 20, 804–813.

Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10826-011-9448-1

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), PATIENT/CONSUMER, Group Education, Telephone Support, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

A repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance was used to determine the intervention’s effects. The SDQ score for the conduct problems subscale indicated a significant intervention effect. In addition, the postintervention scores for all subscales of the PS, the DASS depression subscale and total scores, as well as ratings for perceived difficulty of parenting in the PES, were significantly reduced in the intervention group alone. The PES also revealed that confidence in parenting significantly increased only in the intervention group.

Harden BJ, Sandstrom H, Chazan-Cohen R. Early Head Start and African American families: Impacts and mechanisms of child outcomes. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 2012;27:572–581.

Link: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/257267188_Early_Head_Start_and_African_American_families_Impacts_and_mechanisms_of_child_outcomes

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), PATIENT/CONSUMER, Home Visits, Group Education

Intervention Results:

The data show a wide and strong pattern of impacts of EHS for African American children and families. Path analysis yielded findings that suggested a direct effect of EHS on specific child outcomes and parenting processes within this group of African American families. Parental supportiveness and cognitive stimulation emerged as important direct influences on African American children's outcomes and as pathways through which Early Head Start benefits these children.
   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.