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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 8 (8 total).

Kendrick D., Mulvaney C., Watson M. (2009b). Does targeting injury prevention towards families in disadvantaged areas reduce inequalities in safety practices?, Health Education Research. 24:32-41.

Link: https://academic.oup.com/her/article/24/1/32/592460

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Consultation (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Assessment (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The intervention significantly reduced inequalities in stair gate use by housing tenure (P 5 0.006) and receipt of benefits (P 5 0.04), but did not reduce inequalities in functioning smoke alarms. We conclude that a home safety intervention targeted at deprived areas addressing the barriers of cost and needing help to fit equipment was only partly successful in reducing inequalities in safety practices.

Phelan, K.J., Khoury, J., Xu, Y., Liddy, S., Hornung, R., & Lanphear, B.P. (2011). A randomized controlled trial of home injury hazard reduction: The HOME injury study. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 165(4), 339-345.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3693223/

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Educational Material (caregiver), Consultation (Parent/Family), Education/Training (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The mean age of the children at intervention was 6 months. Injury hazards were significantly reduced in the intervention but not in control group homes at one and two years (p<0.004). There was not a significant difference in the rate for all medically-attended injuries in intervention compared with control group children, 14.3 (95%CI 9.7, 21.1) vs. 20.8 (14.4, 29.9) per 100 child-years (p=0.17) respectively; but there was a significant reduction in modifiable medically attended injuries in intervention compared with control group children, 2.3 (1.0, 5.5) vs. 7.7 (4.2, 14.2) per 100 child-years, respectively (p=0.026).

Kendrick D, Stewart J, Smith S, Coupland C, Hopkins N, Groom L, et al. (2011). Randomised controlled trial of thermostatic mixer valves in reducing bath hot tap water temperature in families with young children in social housing. Archives of Disease in Childhood 2011;96:232–9.

Link: https://adc.bmj.com/content/96/3/232.long

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family), Consultation (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Intervention arm families had a significantly lower bath hot water temperature at 3-month and 12-month follow-up than families in the control arm. They were significantly more likely to be happy or very happy with their bath hot water temperature, significantly less likely to report the temperature as being too hot, and significantly less likely to report checking the temperature of every bath. 15% of intervention arm families reported problems with their TMV.

Callaghan, J., Hyder, A., Khan, R., Blum, L., Arifeen, S., & Baqui, A. H. (2010). Child supervision practices for drowning prevention in rural Bangladesh: A pilot study of supervision tools. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 64(7), 645–647.

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20547700/

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Community Health Workers (CHWs), COMMUNITY, Outreach, CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Assessment (caregiver), PARENT/FAMILY, Consultation (Parent/Family), Training (Parent/Family), Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Statistical analysis of 2694 observations revealed that children were directly supervised or protected by a preventive tool in 96% of visits. Households with a supervision tool had a significantly lower proportion of observations with the child unsupervised and unprotected than households without a tool. Families that received a playpen had 6.89 times the odds of using it at the time of the visit than families that received a door barrier.

D’Halluin, A. R., Roussey, M., Branger, B., Venisse, A., & Pladys, P. (2011). Formative evaluation to improve prevention of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS): A prospective study. Acta Paediatrica, 100(10), e147–e151.

Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2011.02331.x

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Consultation (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Assessment (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide)

Intervention Results:

At follow-up, 91.9% and 86.8% of the mothers reported practicing supine sleep position in the intervention and control group respectively (p=0.16; OR=1.7, 95% CI: 0.7-4.0).

Issler, R. M., Marostica, P. J., & Giugliani, E. R. (2009). Infant sleep position: A randomized clinical trial of an educational intervention in the maternity ward in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Birth, 36(2), 115–121.

Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1523-536X.2009.00308.x

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Consultation (Parent/Family)

Intervention Results:

Among mothers in the intervention group, 42.9 percent put their infants to sleep in a supine position at the 3-month visit, compared with 24 percent of mothers in the control group (p = 0.009). In a multivariate analysis, the intervention at the hospital was the only variable that influenced maternal practices with respect to infant sleep positioning (OR 2.22; 95% CI 1.17–4.19).

Asscher, J. J., Hermanns, J., & Deković, M. (2008). Effectiveness of the home-start parenting support program: Behavioral outcomes for parents and children. Infant Mental Health Journal, 29, 95–113.

Link: https://www.home-start.nl/documenten/Onderzoek%20publicaties%20artikelen/2008%20Effectiveness%20of%20the%20Home-Start%20program.pdf

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Consultation (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), Outreach (caregiver), Motivational Interviewing/Counseling

Intervention Results:

The results showed a significant improvement in perceived parenting competence, but no effects on maternal depressive moods. Mixed results were found for parenting behavior: Parental consistency and observed sensitivity improved significantly in the Home-Start group whereas no effects were found on the other parenting variables.

Bugental DB, Schwartz A. A cognitive approach to child mistreatment prevention among medically at-risk infants. Dev Psychol. 2009;45:284–8.

Link: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2008-19282-018

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), PARENT/FAMILY, Consultation (Parent/Family)

Intervention Results:

Moderate Evidence. In the HV+ condition, results showed (a) a lower use of corporal punishment, (b) greater safety maintenance in the home, and (c) fewer reported child injuries.
   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.