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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 20 (144 total).

Brown, E. C., Low, S., Smith, B. H., & Haggerty, K. P. (2011). Outcomes from a school randomized controlled trial of steps to respect: A bullying prevention program. School Psychology Review, 40(3), 423–443.

Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02796015.2011.12087707

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, School Rules, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas

Intervention Results:

Results of this study demonstrated significant intervention effects for the prevention of school bullying on 50% of all outcomes examined across the three sources of data. Moreover, intervention effects were found for both proximal (self-efficacy, coping skills, etc.) and distal (school environment) outcomes. Most observed intervention effect sizes were relatively small (i.e., less than 0.3); however, effects of this magnitude are not unexpected given the short duration.

Cross, D., Waters, S., Pearce, N., Shaw, T., Hall, M., Erceg, E., et al. (2012). The Friendly Schools Friendly Families programme: Three-year bullying behaviour outcomes in primary school children. International Journal of Educational Research, 53, 394–406.

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0883035512000444?via%3Dihub

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, School Rules, Teacher/Staff Training, PARENT/FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Motivational Interviewing, Other Education

Intervention Results:

The high intervention was more effective than the moderate and low interventions, with significant positive effects for 'being bullied' in the Grades 4 and 6 cohorts, for 'bullying others' in the Grade 4 cohort, and the 'telling if bullied' in the Grade 6 cohort. Comprehensive whole-school programmes that include capacity building and parental involvement appear to reduce bullying behavior more than programmes without these components.

Frey, K. S., Hirschstein, M. K., Edstrom, L. V., & Snell, J. L. (2009). Observed reductions on school bullying, nonbullying aggression, and destructive bystander behavior: A longitudinal evaluation. Journal of Educational Psychology, 101, 466–481.

Link: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2009-04640-018

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, Teacher/Staff Meeting, CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver), YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, School Rules, Reporting & Response System, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media)

Intervention Results:

Intervention students showed 2-year declines in playground bullying, victimization, nonbullying aggression, destructive bystander, and argumentative behavior. Grade-equivalent contrasts indicated group differences in all problem behaviors. Problem behaviors in the control group increased or remained stable across grades. Intervention group students reported less difficulty responding assertively to bullying compared with control students. Within both groups, older students perceived themselves to be more aggressive and less frequently victimized than younger students. Perceived Bystander Responsibility decreased over time, with significant differences found between pretest and the 12- and 18-month posttests. Perceived Adult Responsiveness regarding bullying problems dropped in the second year. The 12- and 18-month posttests indicated that students perceived adults to be less responsive than at pretest, particularly in the fall of the second year (12-month posttest).

Jenson, J. M., Dieterich, W. A., Brisson, D., Bender, K. A., & Powell, A. (2010). Preventing childhood bullying: Findings and lessons from the Denver Public Schools trial. Research on Social Work Practice, 20, 509–517.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1049731509359186

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training

Intervention Results:

Results at the end of the study’s intervention period (end of Year 2) revealed significantly lower rates of victimization among YM subjects compared to students in the control group. We did not, however, find a significant difference in rates of bullying between subjects in the experimental and control group schools at the end of Year 2. Bullying behaviors decreased in both groups; the decline was greater in YM schools but was only marginally significant when compared to control group schools. The significant reduction in bully victimization among experimental subjects found at the end of the YM intervention attenuated slightly at 12-month follow-up.

Krueger, L. M. (2010). The implementation of an anti-bullying program to reduce bullying behaviors on elementary school buses. (Doctoral dissertation, Available from the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses database.)

Link: https://search.proquest.com/openview/f46dd8b9303afffbe699e2e215aeccd7/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=18750&diss=y

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Online Material/Education/Blogging

Intervention Results:

Pretest and posttest data indicated a significant decrease in bullying behaviors for both the control and treatment groups, with the experimental group exhibiting a greater reduction in bullying behaviors than the control group. The results instead seem to show that the anti-bullying intervention had a spillover effect, producing successful reductions in bullying behaviors over time for both groups, though clearly considerably more so for the group that received the intervention than for the control group.

Roland, E., Bru, E., Midthassel, U. V., & Vaaland, G. S. (2010). The Zero programme against bullying: Effects of the programme in the context of the Norwegian manifesto against bullying. Social Psychology of Education, 13, 41–55.

Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11218-009-9096-0

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation, CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver), SCHOOL, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas

Intervention Results:

The present study shows that bullying was reduced among pupils in the schools participating in the Zero programme. Moreover, National surveys in spring 2001 and spring 2004 showed a reduction in pupils being victimised in Norway over 3 years. The majority of the schools comprising the 2004 national sample reported a substantial increase in anti-bullying work compared to the three-year period before 2001. After 12 months of the total 16 months programme period, the overall reduction in the number of pupils being bullied weekly, and more often, was about 25%.

Sapouna, M., Wolke, D., Vannini, N., Watson, S., Woods, S., Schneider, W., et al. (2010). Virtual learning intervention to reduce bullying victimization in primary school: A controlled trial. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 51(1), 104–112.

Link: https://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/1214/1/VLI.pdf

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training

Intervention Results:

Across all time periods, there were fewer victims among the intervention group children compared with controls, but the difference was only statistically significant at the first follow-up. Both groups reported similar rates of bullying perpetration at all time points. UK and German children experienced similar rates of victimization. There was a significantly higher number of bullies among UK children than German children. Teachers in both countries reported problems with the software, and most German teachers considered it poor.

Waasdorp, T. E., Bradshaw, C. P., & Leaf, P. J. (2012). The impact of schoolwide positive behavioral interventions and supports on bullying and peer rejection. Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, 166(2), 149–156.

Link: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/1107694

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, Reporting & Response System, School Rules, CLASSROOM, Class Rules, Enforcement of School Rules, Identification and Monitoring of/Increased Supervision in Targeted Areas, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media)

Intervention Results:

Analyses indicated that children in schools that implemented SWPBIS displayed lower rates of teacher reported bullying and peer rejection than those in schools without SWPBIS. A significant interaction also emerged between grade level of first exposure to SWPBIS and intervention status, suggesting that the effects of SWPBIS on rejection were strongest among children who were first exposed to SWPBIS at a younger age. SWPBIS may help address the increasing national concerns related to school bullying by improving school climate.

Williford, A., Boulton, A., Noland, B., Little, T. D., Karna, A., & Salmivalli, C. (2012). Effects of the KiVa anti-bullying program on adolescents' depression, anxiety, and perception of peers. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 40, 289–300.

Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10802-011-9551-1

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, YOUTH, Adult-led Support/Counseling/Remediation

Intervention Results:

The KiVa program is effective for reducing students’ internalizing problems and improving their peer group perceptions. Finally, changes in anxiety, depression, and positive peer perceptions were found to be predicted by reductions in victimization.

Ahlers-Schmidt, C. R., Schunn, C., Dempsy, M., & Blackon, S. (2014-A). Evaluation of community baby showers to promote safe sleep. Kansas Journal of Medicine, 7, 1–5.

Link: https://journals.ku.edu/kjm/article/view/11476

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Provision of Safe Sleep Item

Intervention Results:

Nearly all (97%) planned to place their baby supine for sleep. However, less than half (47%) planned to have the baby sleep in the parents’ room in a separate crib. Attendees exhibited high levels of safe sleep knowledge, stated intentions to utilize most safe sleep recommendations, and reported babies would have slept in unsafe environments without the portable crib.

Ahlers-Schmidt, C. R., Kuhlmann, S., Kuchlmann, Z., Schunn, C., & Rosell, J. (2014-B). To improve safe-sleep practices, more emphasis should be placed on removing unsafe items from the crib. Clinical Pediatrics, 53(13), 1285–1287.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0009922813518964

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Educational Material (Provider)

Intervention Results:

Most parents were aware of and implementing the American Association of Pediatrics’ recommendations for safe sleep location (88%) and position (79%). However, more than 60% reported at least one item in the crib that would increase the infant’s risk of accidental asphyxiation.

Ahlers-Schmidt, C. R., Schunn, C., Nguyen, M., Nimeskern Miller, J., Rabea Ilahe, R., & Kuhlmann, S. (2015). Does providing infant caregivers with a wearable blanket increase safe sleep practices? A randomized controlled trial. Clinical Pediatrics. doi:10.1177/0009922815572077.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0009922815572077

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, CAREGIVER, Provision of Safe Sleep Item

Intervention Results:

Caregivers who received the wearable blanket were significantly more likely to report that the item was helpful in reminding them to use safe sleep practices (alone, back, crib) than those who received a water bottle, χ2(3) = 16.00, P = .001. However, providing caregivers with wearable blankets did not significantly improve adherence to the AAP’s Safe Sleep guidelines when compared with caregivers in the control group.

Canter, J., Rao, V., Patrick, P. A., Alpan, G., & Altman, R. L. (2015). The impact of a hospital-based educational video on maternal perceptions and planned practices of infant safe sleep. Journal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing. doi:10.1111/jspn. 12114.

Link: https://europepmc.org/article/med/25898856

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide)

Intervention Results:

Mothers who watched the video (n=43) were more likely to observe safe sleep practices while in the hospital than those who did not (n=49) watch the video (67.4% vs. 46.9%, p < .05). They were also less likely to plan for (unsafe) side positioning (23.9% vs. 7.1%, p < .05).

Goodstein, M. H., Bell, T., & Krugman, S. D. (2015). Improving infant sleep safety through a comprehensive hospital-based program. Clinical Pediatrics, 54(3), 212–221.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0009922814566928

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): HOSPITAL, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Sleep Environment Modification, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Educational Material (Provider), Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, Guideline Change and Implementation

Intervention Results:

There were 1092 HD and 490 F/U surveys. Supine sleep knowledge was 99.8% at HD; 94.8% of families planned to always use this position. At F/U, 97.3% retained supine knowledge, and 84.9% maintained this position exclusively (P < .01). Knowledge of crib as safest surface was 99.8% at HD and 99.5% F/U. Use in the parents’ room fell to 91.9% (HD) and 68.2% (F/U). Reinforcing the infant safe sleep message with an intensive hospital-based education program improves parental intentions to comply with the American Academy of Pediatrics’ SIDS risk-reduction guidelines in the home, including supine sleep position, use of a crib without extraneous materials, and appropriate room temperature.

Mason, B., Ahlers-Schmidt, C. R., & Schunn, C. (2013). Improving safe sleep environments for well newborns in the hospital setting. Clinical Pediatrics, 52(10), 969–975.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23872346

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, Provider Training/Education, Educational Material (Provider)

Intervention Results:

At baseline, 25% (36/144) of sleeping infants were safe. Post-intervention, significantly more (58%; 145/249) had safe sleep (P < .0001). Most parents planned to use the supine position (95%; 96/101); none planned to co-sleep. Many intended to adjust their infants’ home sleep environment. Using a multifaceted approach significantly improved infant safe sleep practice in the hospital setting.

Shaefer, S. J., Herman, S. E., Frank, S. J., Adkins, M., & Terhaar, M. (2010). Translating infant safe sleep evidence into nursing practice. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing, 39(6), 618–626.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21044146

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, CAREGIVER, Educational Material (caregiver), Provider Training/Education, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital)

Intervention Results:

Across all 7 sites, among infants in cribs at the time of the audits, there was a significant increase in the percentage on their backs from 80.7% to 91.9% (p<0.05). Outcome measure: % of infants placed to sleep on their backs.

Voos, K. C., Terreros, A., Larimore, P., Leick-Rude, M. K., & Park, N. (2015). Implementing safe sleep practices in a neonatal intensive care unit. The Journal of Maternal-Fetal Neonatal Medicine. Doi:10.3109/14767058.2014.964679.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25212974

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): HOSPITAL, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Quality Improvement, Continuing Education of Hospital Providers, Sleep Environment Modification, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, Provider Training/Education, CAREGIVER, Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Adherence with safe sleep policies in the NICU increased from 21% at baseline to 88% after 1.5 years of program implementation.

Bulzacchelli MT, Gielen AC, Shields WC, McDonald EM, Frattaroli S. (2009) Parental safety-related knowledge and practices associated with visiting a mobile safety center in a low income urban population. Family and Community Health 2009;32(2):147–58.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19305213

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, COMMUNITY, Community Events, Outreach, Presentation, Visual Display, Visual Display, Distribution of Promotional Items, Distribution of Promotional Items

Intervention Results:

Overall, parents receiving T-IPI alone or with supplementary provider information were more likely to report adopting a new injury prevention behavior than those receiving generic information (49% and 45% respectively, compared with 32%), and these effects were greatest among the least educated parents. Across study groups, the most common behavior changes reported were those pertaining to the prevention of burns, poisoning, and airway obstruction. While there were no significant differences between study groups in the use of any safety practice at baseline, there were several notable differences at follow-up in the specific practices adopted. The most common behavior changes reported were those pertaining to the prevention of burns, poisoning and airway obstruction. Intervention groups also made more changes in car seat use, avoided choking risk foods, and no longer leaving the child alone in the bathtub. Conversely, adoption of outlet covers was more common among those receiving generic information.

Hendrickson, S. G., Williams, J., & Acee, T. W. (2008). Immigrant Hispanic mothers’ participation in a dual-site safety intervention. Hispanic Health Care International, 6(2), 71–79.

Link: https://www.scopus.com/record/display.uri?eid=2-s2.0-66949159729&doi=10.1891%2f1540-4153.6.2.71&origin=inward&txGid=ffde0e8f63e8a076721a49e65ff10486

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Home Visits, CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family), PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Community Health Workers (CHWs), Educational Material, Other Person-to-Person Education

Intervention Results:

Results suggest the intervention likely reduced maternal depression and that maternal worry may be a previously undiscovered home safety barrier. Policy implications impact immigrants in ways communities must investigate and assess.

Kendrick D., Mulvaney C., Watson M. (2009b). Does targeting injury prevention towards families in disadvantaged areas reduce inequalities in safety practices?, Health Education Research. 24:32-41.

Link: https://academic.oup.com/her/article/24/1/32/592460

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years)
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Consultation (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Assessment (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The intervention significantly reduced inequalities in stair gate use by housing tenure (P 5 0.006) and receipt of benefits (P 5 0.04), but did not reduce inequalities in functioning smoke alarms. We conclude that a home safety intervention targeted at deprived areas addressing the barriers of cost and needing help to fit equipment was only partly successful in reducing inequalities in safety practices.
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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.