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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Find Established Evidence


Displaying records 1 through 17 (17 total).

D’Halluin AR, Roussey M, Branger B, Venisse A, Pladys P. Formative evaluation to improve prevention of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS): a prospective study. Acta Paediatr. 2011;100(10):e147-e151.

Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2011.02331.x

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Assessment (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

At follow-up, 91.9% and 86.8% of the mothers reported practicing supine sleep position in the intervention and control group respectively (p=0.16; OR=1.7, 95% CI: 0.7-4.0).

Issler RM, Marostica PJ, Giugliani ER. Infant sleep position: a randomized clinical trial of an educational intervention in the maternity ward in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Birth. 2009;36(2):115-121.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19489805

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

In the third postpartum month, 42.9% of the mothers in the intervention group indicated that they put their infants to sleep in the supine position, compared with 24% in the control group (p=0.009). In the sixth postpartum month, these values were 41.8% and 19.1% respectively (p=0.001).

Kistin CJ, Barrero-Castillero A, Lewis S, et al. Maternal note-taking and infant care: a pilot randomised controlled trial. Arch Dis Child. 2012;97(10):916-918.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22806235

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Note-Taking (caregiver), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Mothers in the intervention group were more likely than those in the control group to report placing their infant on their back for sleep (88% vs. 78%), but the difference was not statistically significant (RR=1.13, 95% CI: 0.95-1.34). However, first-time mothers were significantly more likely to report placing their infant on the back for sleep (95% vs. 65%, RR=1.46, 95% CI: 1.06-2.00).

Goetter M, Stepans M. First-time mothers' selection of infant supine sleep positioning. Journal of perinatal education. 2005;14(4):16-23. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/688/CN-00582688/frame.html.

Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/688/CN-00582688/frame.html

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

At the first follow-up (6 to 7 weeks postpartum; 1 week after discharge), mothers in the experimental group reported choosing supine position more often than mothers in the control group (p=0.034). At the second follow-up (6 to 7 weeks after the intervention), responses were mixed. In regard to the current infant sleep position, no significant difference was observed between the two groups (p=0.276). In terms of the sleep position in the previous night, no significant difference was observed (p=0.592). However, on sleep position for naptime on the day of followup, the experimental group reported an increased selection of supine position compared to the control group (p=0.028).

Gelfer P, Cameron R, Masters K, Kennedy KA. Integrating "Back to Sleep" recommendations into neonatal ICU practice. Pediatrics. 2013;131(4):e1264-1270.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23460685

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Provision of Safe Sleep Item, Assessment (Provider), HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Crib Card, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Assessment (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

  • Audit data showed that there was a significant increase in the rate of supine positioning from 39% at baseline to 83% at follow-up (p<0.001).
  • Parental surveys showed that there was a significant increase in the rate of supine position from 73% at baseline to 93% at follow-up (p<0.05).

Geyer JE, Smith PK, Kair LR. Safe sleep for pediatric inpatients. J Spec Pediatr Nurs. 2016;21(3):119-130.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27221207

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Crib Card, Visual Display, Sleep Environment Modification, Promotional Event, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS, COMMUNITY, Visual Display, Social Media, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Between baseline and a year after the initiation of the intervention, the rate of supine positioning increased from 82% to 95%, but the increase was not statistically significant (p=0.183). From baseline to a year following the intervention, the rate of supine positioning remained stable at 83% (p=1.000).

Hill SA, Hjelmeland B, Johannessen NM, Irgens LM, Skjaerven R. Changes in parental risk behaviour after an information campaign against sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in Norway. Acta Paediatr. 2004;93(2):250-254.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15046283

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Provision of Safe Sleep Item, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS, NATIONAL, Campaign, Mass Media, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The prevalence of non-supine sleep position decreased significantly from 33.7% before the campaign to 13.6% after (RR=0.40, 95% CI: 0.37-0.44). The decrease was significant by maternal education, cohabitation, birth order, and maternal age.

Hwang SS, O'Sullivan A, Fitzgerald E, Melvin P, Gorman T, Fiascone JM. Implementation of safe sleep practices in the neonatal intensive care unit. J Perinatol. 2015;35(10):862-866.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26156063

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, HOSPITAL, Crib Card, Visual Display, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

For both sites combined, from the pre- to post-intervention period, there was a significant increase in compliance with supine positioning from 80.4% to 95.8% (p<0.001).

Kuhlmann S, Ahlers-Schmidt CR, Lukasiewicz G, Truong TM. Interventions to improve safe sleep among hospitalized infants at eight children's hospitals. Hosp Pediatr. 2016;6(2):88-94.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26753631

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Provision of Safe Sleep Item, HOSPITAL, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Sleep Environment Modification, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Attestation (Provider)

Intervention Results:

Across all 8 sites, safe sleep position increased from 85.0% at baseline to 96.2% at follow-up (p<0.001).

Macklin JR, Gittelman MA, Denny SA, Southworth H, Arnold MW. The EASE quality improvement project: improving safe sleep practices in Ohio children's hospitals. Pediatrics. 2016;138(4).

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27630074

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Sleep Environment Modification, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Comparing baseline to the last follow-up, there was no significant change in supine sleep position (84.0% to 84.7%) (p=0.913).

McMullen SL, Fioravanti ID, Brown K, Carey MG. Safe sleep for hospitalized infants. MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs. 2016;41(1):43-50.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26658535

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Provision of Safe Sleep Item, Attestation (Provider), HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Crib Card, Visual Display, Sleep Environment Modification, Promotional Event, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Attestation (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Prior to the intervention, 70% of infants were found in the supine sleep position; after the intervention, 90% were found supine (p<0.01).

Rocca Rivarola M, Reyes P, Henson C, et al. Impact of an educational intervention to improve adherence to the recommendations on safe infant sleep. Arch Argent Pediatr. 2016;114(3):223-231.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27164334

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Educational Material (Provider), HOSPITAL, Crib Card, Visual Display, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Caregiver report showed that 42% and 77% of infants were asleep supine at baseline and follow-up respectively (p<0.0001).

Srivatsa B, Eden AN, Mir MA. Infant sleep position and SIDS: a hospital-based interventional study. J Urban Health. 1999;76(3):314-321.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12607898

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Visual Display, HOSPITAL, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Comparing baseline to follow-up, there was no significant change in supine sleep position (20.4% vs. 22.4%) (p>0.05).

Voos KC, Terreros A, Larimore P, Leick-Rude MK, Park N. Implementing safe sleep practices in a neonatal intensive care unit. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2015;28(14):1637-1640.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25212974

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Assessment (Provider), HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Sleep Environment Modification

Intervention Results:

Comparing baseline to follow-up, there was no significant change in infants not positioned on back (21% vs. 12%) (p>0.05).

Moon RY, Oden RP, Grady KC. Back to Sleep: an educational intervention with women, infants, and children program clients. Pediatrics. 2004;113(3 Pt 1):542-547.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14993547

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

At the 6-month follow-up, 75% of the infants in the intervention group were usually placed to sleep on their backs compared with 45.1% in the comparison group (p=0.0005).

Hauck, F. R., Tanabe, K. O., McMurry, T., & Moon, R. Y. (2015). Evaluation of bedtime basics for babies: a national crib distribution program to reduce the risk of sleep-related sudden infant deaths. Journal of community health, 40(3), 457-463.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4405482/

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Provision of Safe Sleep Item, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), PARENT/FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), NATIONAL, Campaign, Mass Media

Intervention Results:

Ninety percent reported that the baby slept in a crib after the intervention, compared with 51 % postnatally (p < 0.01). BBB was successful in changing knowledge and practices in the majority of high-risk participants with regards to placing the infant supine in a crib for sleep. Crib distribution and safe sleep education positively influence knowledge and practices about safe sleep.

Moon, R. Y., Hauck, F. R., Colson, E. R., Kellams, A. L., Geller, N. L., Heeren, T., & Corwin, M. J. (2017). The effect of nursing quality improvement and mobile health interventions on infant sleep practices: a randomized clinical trial. Jama, 318(4), 351-359.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5593130/

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, Quality Improvement/Practice-Wide Intervention

Intervention Results:

The primary outcome was maternal self-reported adherence to 4 infant safe sleep practices of sleep position (supine), sleep location (room sharing without bed sharing), soft bedding use (none), and pacifier use (any); data were collected by maternal survey when the infant was aged 60 to 240 days. The independent effect of the nursing quality improvement intervention was not significant for all outcomes. Interactions between the 2 interventions were only significant for the supine sleep position.
   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.