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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 20 (34 total).

Ahlers-Schmidt, C. R., Schunn, C., Dempsy, M., & Blackon, S. (2014-A). Evaluation of community baby showers to promote safe sleep. Kansas Journal of Medicine, 7, 1–5.

Link: https://journals.ku.edu/kjm/article/view/11476

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Provision of Safe Sleep Item

Intervention Results:

Nearly all (97%) planned to place their baby supine for sleep. However, less than half (47%) planned to have the baby sleep in the parents’ room in a separate crib. Attendees exhibited high levels of safe sleep knowledge, stated intentions to utilize most safe sleep recommendations, and reported babies would have slept in unsafe environments without the portable crib.

Ahlers-Schmidt, C. R., Kuhlmann, S., Kuchlmann, Z., Schunn, C., & Rosell, J. (2014-B). To improve safe-sleep practices, more emphasis should be placed on removing unsafe items from the crib. Clinical Pediatrics, 53(13), 1285–1287.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0009922813518964

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Educational Material (Provider)

Intervention Results:

Most parents were aware of and implementing the American Association of Pediatrics’ recommendations for safe sleep location (88%) and position (79%). However, more than 60% reported at least one item in the crib that would increase the infant’s risk of accidental asphyxiation.

Ahlers-Schmidt, C. R., Schunn, C., Nguyen, M., Nimeskern Miller, J., Rabea Ilahe, R., & Kuhlmann, S. (2015). Does providing infant caregivers with a wearable blanket increase safe sleep practices? A randomized controlled trial. Clinical Pediatrics. doi:10.1177/0009922815572077.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0009922815572077

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, CAREGIVER, Provision of Safe Sleep Item

Intervention Results:

Caregivers who received the wearable blanket were significantly more likely to report that the item was helpful in reminding them to use safe sleep practices (alone, back, crib) than those who received a water bottle, χ2(3) = 16.00, P = .001. However, providing caregivers with wearable blankets did not significantly improve adherence to the AAP’s Safe Sleep guidelines when compared with caregivers in the control group.

Canter, J., Rao, V., Patrick, P. A., Alpan, G., & Altman, R. L. (2015). The impact of a hospital-based educational video on maternal perceptions and planned practices of infant safe sleep. Journal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing. doi:10.1111/jspn. 12114.

Link: https://europepmc.org/article/med/25898856

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Presentation/Meeting/Information Session/Event, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide)

Intervention Results:

Mothers who watched the video (n=43) were more likely to observe safe sleep practices while in the hospital than those who did not (n=49) watch the video (67.4% vs. 46.9%, p < .05). They were also less likely to plan for (unsafe) side positioning (23.9% vs. 7.1%, p < .05).

Goodstein, M. H., Bell, T., & Krugman, S. D. (2015). Improving infant sleep safety through a comprehensive hospital-based program. Clinical Pediatrics, 54(3), 212–221.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0009922814566928

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): HOSPITAL, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Sleep Environment Modification, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Educational Material (Provider), Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, Guideline Change and Implementation

Intervention Results:

There were 1092 HD and 490 F/U surveys. Supine sleep knowledge was 99.8% at HD; 94.8% of families planned to always use this position. At F/U, 97.3% retained supine knowledge, and 84.9% maintained this position exclusively (P < .01). Knowledge of crib as safest surface was 99.8% at HD and 99.5% F/U. Use in the parents’ room fell to 91.9% (HD) and 68.2% (F/U). Reinforcing the infant safe sleep message with an intensive hospital-based education program improves parental intentions to comply with the American Academy of Pediatrics’ SIDS risk-reduction guidelines in the home, including supine sleep position, use of a crib without extraneous materials, and appropriate room temperature.

Mason, B., Ahlers-Schmidt, C. R., & Schunn, C. (2013). Improving safe sleep environments for well newborns in the hospital setting. Clinical Pediatrics, 52(10), 969–975.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23872346

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, Provider Training/Education, Educational Material (Provider)

Intervention Results:

At baseline, 25% (36/144) of sleeping infants were safe. Post-intervention, significantly more (58%; 145/249) had safe sleep (P < .0001). Most parents planned to use the supine position (95%; 96/101); none planned to co-sleep. Many intended to adjust their infants’ home sleep environment. Using a multifaceted approach significantly improved infant safe sleep practice in the hospital setting.

Shaefer, S. J., Herman, S. E., Frank, S. J., Adkins, M., & Terhaar, M. (2010). Translating infant safe sleep evidence into nursing practice. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing, 39(6), 618–626.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21044146

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, CAREGIVER, Educational Material (caregiver), Provider Training/Education, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital)

Intervention Results:

Across all 7 sites, among infants in cribs at the time of the audits, there was a significant increase in the percentage on their backs from 80.7% to 91.9% (p<0.05). Outcome measure: % of infants placed to sleep on their backs.

Voos, K. C., Terreros, A., Larimore, P., Leick-Rude, M. K., & Park, N. (2015). Implementing safe sleep practices in a neonatal intensive care unit. The Journal of Maternal-Fetal Neonatal Medicine. Doi:10.3109/14767058.2014.964679.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25212974

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): HOSPITAL, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Quality Improvement, Continuing Education of Hospital Providers, Sleep Environment Modification, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, Provider Training/Education, CAREGIVER, Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Adherence with safe sleep policies in the NICU increased from 21% at baseline to 88% after 1.5 years of program implementation.

Ahlers-Schmidt CR, Schunn C, Nguyen M, Nimeskern-Miller J, Ilahe R, Kuhlmann S. Does providing infant caregivers with a wearable blanket increase safe sleep practices? A randomized controlled trial. Clin Pediatr (Phil). 2015:0009922815572077.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25673627

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Provision of Safe Sleep Item, CAREGIVER

Intervention Results:

At baseline, 83% of the caregivers in the control group and 89% in the intervention group reported placing their infants to sleep on their backs. At follow-up, the control group increased to 88% while the intervention group remained at 89%. No significant difference was observed between the two groups at post-intervention.

D’Halluin AR, Roussey M, Branger B, Venisse A, Pladys P. Formative evaluation to improve prevention of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS): a prospective study. Acta Paediatr. 2011;100(10):e147-e151.

Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2011.02331.x

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Assessment (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

At follow-up, 91.9% and 86.8% of the mothers reported practicing supine sleep position in the intervention and control group respectively (p=0.16; OR=1.7, 95% CI: 0.7-4.0).

Issler RM, Marostica PJ, Giugliani ER. Infant sleep position: a randomized clinical trial of an educational intervention in the maternity ward in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Birth. 2009;36(2):115-121.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19489805

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Among mothers in the intervention group, 42.9 percent put their infants to sleep in a supine position at the 3-month visit, compared with 24 percent of mothers in the control group (p = 0.009). In a multivariate analysis, the intervention at the hospital was the only variable that influenced maternal practices with respect to infant sleep positioning (OR 2.22; 95% CI 1.17-4.19).

Kistin CJ, Barrero-Castillero A, Lewis S, et al. Maternal note-taking and infant care: a pilot randomised controlled trial. Arch Dis Child. 2012;97(10):916-918.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22806235

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Note-Taking (caregiver), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Mothers in the intervention group were more likely than those in the control group to report placing their infant on their back for sleep (88% vs. 78%), but the difference was not statistically significant (RR=1.13, 95% CI: 0.95-1.34). However, first-time mothers were significantly more likely to report placing their infant on the back for sleep (95% vs. 65%, RR=1.46, 95% CI: 1.06-2.00).

Goetter M, Stepans M. First-time mothers' selection of infant supine sleep positioning. Journal of perinatal education. 2005;14(4):16-23.

Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/o/cochrane/clcentral/articles/688/CN-00582688/frame.html

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

At the first follow-up (6 to 7 weeks postpartum; 1 week after discharge), mothers in the experimental group reported choosing supine position more often than mothers in the control group (p=0.034). At the second follow-up (6 to 7 weeks after the intervention), responses were mixed. In regard to the current infant sleep position, no significant difference was observed between the two groups (p=0.276). In terms of the sleep position in the previous night, no significant difference was observed (p=0.592). However, on sleep position for naptime on the day of followup, the experimental group reported an increased selection of supine position compared to the control group (p=0.028).

Moon RY, Calabrese T, Aird L. Reducing the risk of sudden infant death syndrome in child care and changing provider practices: lessons learned from a demonstration project. Pediatrics. 2008;122(4):788-798.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18829803

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education

Intervention Results:

Provider awareness of the American Academy of Pediatrics infant supine sleep position recommendation increased from 59.7% (both groups) to 64.8% (control) and 80.5% (intervention). Exclusive use of the supine position in programs increased from 65.0% to 70.4% (control) and 87.8% (intervention). Observed supine placement increased from 51.0% to 57.1% (control) and 62.1% (intervention).

Colson ER, Joslin SC. Changing nursery practice gets inner-city infants in the supine position for sleep. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2002;156(7):717-720.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12090841

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education

Intervention Results:

Infant observations showed that 20% and 99% of the infants in the well-newborn nursery were placed in the supine position before and after the intervention respectively (p<0.05). Parents reported that 37% and 88% of nursery staff exclusively placed infants to sleep in the supine position before and after the intervention respectively (OR=12.5, 95% CI: 5.7-27.7). Parent report showed that 42% and 75% of parents usually placed infants to sleep in the supine position at home before and after the intervention respectively (OR=4.2, 95% CI: 2.1-7.9).

Gelfer P, Cameron R, Masters K, Kennedy KA. Integrating "Back to Sleep" recommendations into neonatal ICU practice. Pediatrics. 2013;131(4):e1264-1270.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23460685

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Provision of Safe Sleep Item, Assessment (Provider), HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Crib Card, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Assessment (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Audit data showed that there was a significant increase in the rate of supine positioning from 39% at baseline to 83% at follow-up (p<0.001). Parental surveys showed that there was a significant increase in the rate of supine position from 73% at baseline to 93% at follow-up (p<0.05).

Geyer JE, Smith PK, Kair LR. Safe sleep for pediatric inpatients. J Spec Pediatr Nurs. 2016;21(3):119-130.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27221207

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Crib Card, Sleep Environment Modification, Promotional Event, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS, COMMUNITY, Social Media, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Visual Display (Community)

Intervention Results:

The proportion of infant cribs without loose objects in them increased (32-72%, p = .025), and safe sleep positioning remained stable (82% vs. 95%, p = .183).

Hiley CM, Morley CJ. Evaluation of government's campaign to reduce risk of cot death. BMJ. 1994;309(6956):703-704.

Link: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.309.6956.703

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): NATIONAL, Campaign

Intervention Results:

Comparing before and after the campaign, there was a significant increase in supine position for newborns from 9% to 40% (p<0.0001), for 3 month olds from 14% to 54% (p<0.0001), and for 6 months old from 30% to 64% (p<0.0001).

Hill SA, Hjelmeland B, Johannessen NM, Irgens LM, Skjaerven R. Changes in parental risk behaviour after an information campaign against sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in Norway. Acta Paediatr. 2004;93(2):250-254.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15046283

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Provision of Safe Sleep Item, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS, NATIONAL, Campaign, Mass Media, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The prevalence of non-supine sleep position decreased significantly from 33.7% before the campaign to 13.6% after (RR=0.40, 95% CI: 0.37-0.44). The decrease was significant by maternal education, cohabitation, birth order, and maternal age.

Hwang SS, O'Sullivan A, Fitzgerald E, Melvin P, Gorman T, Fiascone JM. Implementation of safe sleep practices in the neonatal intensive care unit. J Perinatol. 2015;35(10):862-866.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26156063

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, HOSPITAL, Crib Card, Visual Display (Hospital), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Of 755 cases, 395 (52.3%) were assessed to be eligible for SSP. From the pre- to post-intervention period, there was a significant improvement in overall compliance with SSP (25.9 to 79.7%; P-value<0.001). Adherence to each component of SSP also improved significantly following the intervention.
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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.