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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 20 (63 total).

Mackrain M, Fitzgerald E, Fogerty S, Martin J, O'Connor R, Arbour M. The HV CoIIN: implementing quality improvement to achieve breakthrough change in exclusive breastfeeding rates within MIECHV home visiting. MIECHV TACC, June 2015.

Link: https://georgetown.box.com/s/jsjslesg2m3bznpnzuzzrkv85hgtujre

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Home Visits, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Quality Improvement/Practice-Wide Intervention

Intervention Results:

The HV CoIIN’s theory of change includes a comprehensive approach to increasing the percentage of mothers that exclusively breastfeed their infants until they are three and six months of age by redesigning the ways we engage mothers, provide breastfeeding support in home visits, and ensure seamless linkages for mothers to access and engage in peer and community breastfeeding supports. Within the first eleven months, the HV CoIIN is generating promising movement toward breakthrough change across indicators, On average, 74% of all home visitors within the breastfeeding collaborative across 11-months, are being trained in lactation and infant feeding, with a trend in the data towards meeting our overall Process AIM. Over the last four months, the average has increased to more than 89%. On average, 69% of mothers with an identified need for breastfeeding support are receiving professional or peer breastfeeding support across the collaborative. Efforts in Action period three will aim to strengthen community and peer supports for families. The average percent of women exclusively breastfeeding is 16%, up 13 percentage points from the baseline of 3% of women.

Anderson AK, Damio G, Young S, Chapman DJ, Perez-Escamilla R. A randomized trial assessing the efficacy of peer counseling on exclusive breastfeeding in a predominantly Latina low-income community. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005;159:836-841.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16143742

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Peer Counselor, Educational Material, Home Visits

Intervention Results:

Significantly more mothers in the control group had not initiated breastfeeding compared to mothers in the intervention group (RR= 2.48; 95% CI: 1.04-5.90)

Begley C, Devane D, Clarke M, et al. Comparison of midwife-led and consultant-led care of healthy women at low risk of childbirth complications in the Republic of Ireland: a randomised trial. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2011;11:85.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22035427

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Midwife

Intervention Results:

No significant difference in breastfeeding initiation between intervention and control groups (RR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.89-1.06)

Bonuck K, Freeman K, Trombley M. Randomized controlled trial of a prenatal and postnatal lactation consultant intervention on infant health care use. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2006;160(9):953-960.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16953019

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Lactation Consultant, Home Visits, Telephone Support

Intervention Results:

There was a significant interaction between treatment and Medicaid; among those not receiving Medicaid, the number of otitis media visits was higher among controls (P

Bonuck K, Stuebe A, Barnett J, Labbok MH, Fletcher J, Bernstein PS. Effect of primary care intervention on breastfeeding duration and intensity. Am J Public Health. 2014;104(S1):S119- 127.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24354834

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Lactation Consultant, Home Visits, Telephone Support, Provision of Breastfeeding Item, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Other (Provider Practice)

Intervention Results:

In Best Infant Nutrition for Good Outcomes (BINGO) at 3 months, high intensity was greater for the LC+EP (odds ratio [OR] = 2.72; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08, 6.84) and LC (OR = 3.22; 95% CI = 1.14, 9.09) groups versus usual care, but not for the EP group alone. In PAIRINGS at 3 months, intervention rates exceeded usual care (OR = 2.86; 95% CI = 1.21, 6.76); the number needed to treat to prevent 1 dyad from nonexclusive breastfeeding at 3 months was 10.3 (95% CI = 5.6, 50.7).

Brent NB, Redd B, Dworetz A, D'Amico F, Greenberg J. Breast-feeding in a low-income population: program to increase incidence and duration. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1995;149:798-803.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7795772

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Lactation Consultant, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education

Intervention Results:

There was a markedly higher incidence of breast-feeding in the intervention group, as compared with that of the control group (61% vs 32%, respectively; P = .002). The duration of breast-feeding was also significantly longer in the intervention group (P = .005).

Carlsen E, Kyhnaeb A, Renault K, Cortes D, Michaelsen K, Pryds O. Telephone-based support prolongs breastfeeding duration in obese women: a randomized trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013;98(5):1226-1232.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24004897

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Lactation Consultant, Telephone Support

Intervention Results:

The support group breastfed exclusively for a median of 120 d (25th-75th percentiles: 14-142 d) compared with 41 d (3-133 d) for control subjects (P = 0.003). Any breastfeeding was maintained for a median of 184 d (92-185 d) for the support group compared with 108 d (16-185 d) for control subjects (P = 0.002). Support increased the adjusted ORs for exclusive breastfeeding at 3 mo and the ratios for partial breastfeeding at 6 mo to 2.45 (95% CI: 1.36, 4.41; P = 0.003) and 2.25 (95% CI: 1.24, 4.08; P = 0.008, respectively). Although the duration of exclusive breastfeeding was inversely associated with infant weight (β = -4.39 g/d; 95% CI: -0.66, -8.11 g/d; P = 0.021) and infant length at 6 mo (β = -0. 012 cm/d; 95% CI: -0.004, -0.02 cm/d; P = 0.004), the breastfeeding support did not achieve a significant effect on infant growth at 6 mo (n = 192).

Chapman D, Morel K, Bermúdez-Millán A, Young S, Damio G, Pérez-Escamilla R. Breastfeeding education and support trial for overweight and obese women: a randomized trial. Pediatrics. 2013;131(1):e162-170.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23209111

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Peer Counselor, Home Visits, Telephone Support, Provision of Breastfeeding Item

Intervention Results:

The intervention had no impact on EBF or breastfeeding continuation at 1, 3, or 6 months postpartum. In adjusted posthoc analyses, at 2 weeks postpartum the intervention group had significantly greater odds of continuing any breastfeeding (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 3.76 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-13.22]), and giving at least 50% of feedings as breast milk (aOR: 4.47 [95% CI: 1.38-14.5]), compared with controls. Infants in the intervention group had significantly lower odds of hospitalization during the first 6 months after birth (aOR: 0.24 [95% CI: 0.07-0.86]).

Efrat MW, Esparza S, Mendelson SG, Lane CJ. The effect of lactation educators implementing a telephone-based intervention among low-income Hispanics: a randomised trial. Health Educ J. 2015;74(4):424-441.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26941454

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Telephone Support

Intervention Results:

There were no differences between the groups in rates of breastfeeding initiation. There was a significant difference in the duration of exclusive breastfeeding among participants during the infant's first week of life. While not significant, after controlling for covariates and intent to breastfeed at third trimester, the duration of exclusive breastfeeding amongst all participants was, on average, longer for intervention group mothers than control group mothers. Additionally, , the intervention group mothers were more likely to report exclusive and only breastfeeding at all data points compared to the control group, and less likely to discontinue breastfeeding.

Finch C, Daniel EL. Breastfeeding education program with incentives increases exclusive breastfeeding among urban WIC participants. J Am Diet Assoc. 2002;102(7):981-984.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12146564

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Group Education

Intervention Results:

No differences in breastfeeding initiation between groups

Forster D, McLachlan H, Lumley J, Beanland C, Waldenström U, Amir L. Two mid-pregnancy interventions to increase the initiation and duration of breastfeeding: a randomized controlled trial. Birth. 2004;31(3):176-182.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15330879

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Midwife, Group Education

Intervention Results:

Neither intervention increased breastfeeding initiation or duration compared with standard care. Rates at initiation were 97 percent (296/306) for the Practical Skills intervention, 95 percent (291/308) for the Attitudes intervention, and 96 percent (297/310) for standard care. Rates at 6 months were, respectively, 55 percent (162/297), 50 percent (146/293), and 54 percent (162/299).

Graffy J, Taylor J, Williams A, Eldridge S. Randomised controlled trial of support from volunteer counsellors for mothers considering breast feeding. BMJ. 2004;328(7430):26.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14703543

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Home Visits, Telephone Support

Intervention Results:

No differences in breastfeeding initiation between intervention and control groups (95% vs 96%; RR=.99, 95% CI: .84-1.16, p=.44)

Howell EA, Bodnar-Deren S, Balbierz A, Parides M, Bickell N. An intervention to extend breastfeeding among black and Latina mothers after delivery. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2014;239:e1- e5.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24262719

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Other Education, Telephone Support

Intervention Results:

Mothers in the intervention arm breastfed for a longer duration than did the control subjects (median, 12.0 vs 6.5 weeks, respectively; P = .02) Mothers in the intervention arm were less likely to quit breastfeeding over the first 6 months after delivery (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.97).

Johnston B, Huebner C, Anderson M, Tyll L, Thompson R. Healthy steps in an integrated delivery system: child and parent outcomes at 30 months. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2006;160(8):793-800.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16894077

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Home Visits, Telephone Support

Intervention Results:

Intervention was associated with positive outcomes in timely well-child care, immunization rates, breastfeeding, television viewing, injury prevention, and discipline strategies. Prenatal initiation of services was associated with larger expressive vocabularies at age 24 months. Mothers who received the intervention reported more depressive symptoms, but there was no increase in the proportion with clinically significant depression.

Kellams AL, Gurka KK, Hornsby PP, et al. The impact of a prenatal education video on rates of breastfeeding initiation and exclusivity during the newborn hospital stay in a low-income population. J Hum Lact. 2016;32(1):152-159.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26289058

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Educational Material, PATIENT/CONSUMER

Intervention Results:

Exposure to the intervention did not affect breastfeeding initiation rates or duration during the hospital stay. The lack of an effect on breastfeeding initiation persisted even after controlling for partner, parent, or other living at home and infant complications (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.05, 95% CI, 0.70-1.56). In addition, breastfeeding exclusivity rates during the hospital stay did not differ between the groups (P = .87).

McDonald S, Henderson J, Faulkner S, Evans S, Hagan R. Effect of an extended midwifery postnatal support programme on the duration of breast feeding: a randomised controlled trial. Midwifery. 2010;26(1):88-100.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18486287

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Midwife, Educational Material, Home Visits, Telephone Support

Intervention Results:

Findings: there was no difference between the groups at six months postpartum for either full breast feeding [EMS 43.3% versus SMS 42.5%, relative risk (RR) 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.87-1.19] or any breast feeding (EMS 63.9% versus SMS 67.9%, RR 0.94, 95%CI 0.85-1.04).

Morrell C, Spiby H, Stewart P, Walters S, Morgan A. Costs and effectiveness of community postnatal support workers: randomised controlled trial. BMJ. 2000;321(7261):593-598.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10977833

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Home Visits

Intervention Results:

At six weeks there was no significant improvement in health status among the women in the intervention group. At six weeks the mean total NHS costs were pound 635 for the intervention group and pound 456 for the control group (P=0.001). At six months figures were pound 815 and pound 639 (P=0.001). There were no differences between the groups in use of social services or personal costs. The women in the intervention group were very satisfied with the support worker visits.

Nolan A, Lawrence C. A pilot study of a nursing intervention protocol to minimize maternal- infant separation after Cesarean birth. J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2009;38(4):430-442.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19614878

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Hospital Policies

Intervention Results:

Compared with the control group, the intervention group experienced earlier first physical contact and feedings and a longer interval until the infant first bath. Differences were found between treatment groups for infant temperatures and respiratory rates. Three infants in the control group experienced suboptimal temperatures. Infants in the intervention group had significantly higher salivary cortisol levels but were within the normal upper level range. No differences were noted in maternal pain, maternal anxiety, or perception of birth experience among treatment groups.

Srinivas GL, Benson M, Worley S, Schulte E. A clinic-based breastfeeding peer counselor intervention in an urban, low-income population: interaction with breastfeeding attitude. J Hum Lact. 2015;31(1):120-128.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25193602

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Peer Counselor, Telephone Support

Intervention Results:

Women with positive attitudes had significantly higher rates of initiation (93% vs 61%) and breastfeeding at 1 and 6 months (79% vs 25% and 12% vs 0%, respectively) than those with negative attitudes, regardless of intervention. After adjusting for self-efficacy, women who received peer counseling had significantly higher breastfeeding rates at 1 month (odds ratio = 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-9.8). The intervention group was marginally more likely to achieve their breastfeeding goal (43% vs 22%, P = .073).

Wolfberg A, Michels K, Shields WD, O'Campo P, Bronner Y, Bienstock J. Dads as breastfeeding advocates: results from a randomized controlled trial of an educational intervention. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2004;191:708-712.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15467529

NPM: 4: Breastfeeding
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Partner-Level Intervention

Intervention Results:

Overall, breastfeeding was initiated by 74% of women whose partners attended the intervention class, as compared with 41% of women whose partners attended the control class (P = .02).
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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.