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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 2 (2 total).

Flores G, Lin H, Walker C, Lee M, Currie J, Allgeyer R, Fierro M, Henry M, Portillo A, Massey K. Parent mentoring program increases coverage rates for uninsured Latino children. Health Affairs. 2018 Mar 1;37(3):403-12.

Link: https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/full/10.1377/hlthaff.2017.1272

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Public Insurance (Health Care Provider/Practice), Educational Material (Provider), PARENT_FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), PROFESSIONAL_CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver), PATIENT_CONSUMER, Peer Counselor, Parent Mentors

Intervention Results:

The study found that parent mentors were more effective than traditional methods in insuring children (95% vs. 69%), achieving faster coverage and greater parental satisfaction, reducing unmet health care needs, providing children with primary care providers, and improving the quality of well-child and subspecialty care. Children in the parent-mentor group had higher quality of overall and specialty care, lower out-of-pocket spending, and higher rates of coverage two years after the end of the intervention (100% vs. 70%). Parent mentors are highly effective in insuring uninsured Latino children and eliminating disparities. Parent mentors, as a special category of community health workers, could be an excellent fit with and complement to current state community health worker models. This RCT documented that the Kids’ HELP intervention is significantly more efficacious than traditional Medicaid and CHIP methods of insuring Latino children. Kids’ HELP eliminates coverage disparities for Latino children, insures children more quickly and with greater parental satisfaction than among control parents, enhances health care access, reduces unmet needs, improves the quality of well-child and subspecialty care, reduces out-of-pocket spending and family financial burden, empowers parents, ad creates jobs.

Flores G, Lin H, Walker C, Lee M, Currie JM, Allgeyer R, Fierro M, Henry M, Portillo A, Massey K. Parent mentors and insuring uninsured children: A randomized controlled trial. Pediatrics. 2016 Apr 1;137(4).

Link: https://www.publications.aap.org/pediatrics/article-abstract/137/4/e20153519/81477/Parent-Mentors-and-Insuring-Uninsured-Children-A?redirectedFrom=fulltext

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Public Insurance (Health Care Provider/Practice), Educational Material (Provider), PARENT_FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), PROFESSIONAL_CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver), PATIENT_CONSUMER, Peer Counselor, Parent Mentors

Intervention Results:

In the Kids’ HELP trial, the intervention was more effective than traditional outreach/enrollment in insuring uninsured minority children, resulting in 95% of children obtaining insurance vs. 68% of controls. The intervention also insured children faster, and was more effective in renewing coverage, improving access to medical and dental care, reducing out-of-pocket costs, achieving parental satisfaction and quality of care, and sustaining insurance after intervention cessation. This is the first RCT to evaluate the effectiveness of parent mentors in insuring uninsured children. Kids’ HELP could possibly save $12.1 to $14.1 billion. Parent mentors were more effective in improving access to primary, dental, and specialty care; reducing unmet needs, achieving parental satisfaction with care, and sustaining long-term coverage. Parent mentors resulted in lower out-of-pocket costs for doctor and sick visits, higher well-child care quality ratings, and higher levels of parental satisfaction and respect from children’s physicians.
   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.