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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 16 (16 total).

Aller J. Enrolling eligible but uninsured children in Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP): A multi-district pilot program in Michigan schools (Doctoral dissertation, Central Michigan University). Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences. Vol.75(11-A(E)),2015, pp. No Pagination Specified.

Link: https://www.proquest.com/docview/1562017977?fromopenview=true&pq-origsite=gscholar

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Public Insurance (Health Care Provider/Practice), Collaboration with Local Agencies (State), Collaboration with Local Agencies (Health Care Provider/Practice), CLASSROOM_SCHOOL, PROFESSIONAL_CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver), Communication Tools, Distribution of Promotional Items (Classroom/School)

Intervention Results:

As a result of the survey, 156 children were identified as not having health insurance. This represents more than 44% of the 358 children who are eligible for State subsidized health insurance, in the participating school districts, but are uninsured. Integrating the collection of health insurance status into routine school communication channels is an effective way to identify children who do not have health insurance and may be eligible for state subsidized benefits.

Caskey R, Moran K, Touchette D, Martin M, Munoz G, Kanabar P, Van Voorhees B. Effect of comprehensive care coordination on medicaid expenditures compared with usual care among children and youth with chronic disease: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA network open. 2019 Oct 2;2(10):e1912604-.

Link: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/article-abstract/2752352

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Care Coordination, Public Insurance (Health Care Provider/Practice)

Intervention Results:

Overall Medicaid expenditures and utilization decreased considerably during the first year of the CHECK program for both participants and the usual care group. Notably, expenditures did not increase among CHECK participants, which has been noted in other care coordination programs. The rate of inpatient and ED utilization decreased for both groups. The mean (SD) inpatient utilization before enrollment in CHECK was 63.0 (344.4) per 1000 PYs for the intervention group and 69.3 (370.9) per 1000 PYs for the usual care group, which decreased to 43.5 (297.2) per 1000 PYs and 47.8 (304.9) per 1000 PYs, respectively, after the intervention.

Chao R, Bertonaschi S, Gazmararian J. Healthy beginnings: A system of care for children in Atlanta. Health Affairs. 2014;33(12):2260-2264.

Link: https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/full/10.1377/hlthaff.2014.0706

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Public Insurance (Health Care Provider/Practice), Educational Material (Provider), Collaboration with Local Agencies (State), Collaboration with Local Agencies (Health Care Provider/Practice), Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, PROFESSIONAL_CAREGIVER, Patient Navigation (Assistance), Care Coordination, STATE, Multicomponent Approach

Intervention Results:

Healthy Beginnings coordinated care approach has ensured that participating children and families have health insurance (97%) and receive regular immunizations (92%), ongoing health care from a primary care physician and dental health provider, and regular developmental screenings (98%) and follow-up care. Healthy Beginnings has dramatically increased children’s access to health care and forms the basis for a cost-effective approach that can be replicated in other communities.

DeVoe JE, Marino M, Angier H, O’Malley JP, Crawford C, Nelson C, Tillotson CJ, Bailey SR, Gallia C, Gold R. Effect of expanding Medicaid for parents on children’s health insurance coverage: lessons from the Oregon experiment. JAMA pediatrics. 2015 Jan 1;169(1):e143145-.

Link: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/article-abstract/2086457

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Public Insurance (Health Care Provider/Practice), STATE, Perinatal Committees/Councils

Intervention Results:

Children’s odds of having Medicaid or CHIP coverage increased when their parents were randomly selected to apply for Medicaid; findings demonstrate a causal link between parents’ access to Medicaid coverage and their children’s coverage. Children whose parents were randomly selected to apply for Medicaid had 18% higher odds of being covered in the first 6 months after parent’s selection compared with children whose parents were not selected. In the immediate period after selection, children whose parents were selected to apply for Medicaid significantly increased from 3830 (61.4%) to 4152 (66.6%) compared with a non-significant change from 5049 (61.8%) to 5044 (61.7%) for children whose parents were not selected to apply. The effect remained significant during months 7 to 12; months 13 to 18 showed a positive but not significant effect. Children whose parents were selected and obtained coverage had more than double the odds of having coverage compared with children whose parents were not selected and did not gain coverage.

Flores G, Lin H, Walker C, Lee M, Currie J, Allgeyer R, Fierro M, Henry M, Portillo A, Massey K. Parent mentoring program increases coverage rates for uninsured Latino children. Health Affairs. 2018 Mar 1;37(3):403-12.

Link: https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/full/10.1377/hlthaff.2017.1272

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Public Insurance (Health Care Provider/Practice), Educational Material (Provider), PARENT_FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), PROFESSIONAL_CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver), PATIENT_CONSUMER, Peer Counselor, Parent Mentors

Intervention Results:

The study found that parent mentors were more effective than traditional methods in insuring children (95% vs. 69%), achieving faster coverage and greater parental satisfaction, reducing unmet health care needs, providing children with primary care providers, and improving the quality of well-child and subspecialty care. Children in the parent-mentor group had higher quality of overall and specialty care, lower out-of-pocket spending, and higher rates of coverage two years after the end of the intervention (100% vs. 70%). Parent mentors are highly effective in insuring uninsured Latino children and eliminating disparities. Parent mentors, as a special category of community health workers, could be an excellent fit with and complement to current state community health worker models. This RCT documented that the Kids’ HELP intervention is significantly more efficacious than traditional Medicaid and CHIP methods of insuring Latino children. Kids’ HELP eliminates coverage disparities for Latino children, insures children more quickly and with greater parental satisfaction than among control parents, enhances health care access, reduces unmet needs, improves the quality of well-child and subspecialty care, reduces out-of-pocket spending and family financial burden, empowers parents, ad creates jobs.

Flores G, Lin H, Walker C, Lee M, Currie JM, Allgeyer R, Fierro M, Henry M, Portillo A, Massey K. Parent mentors and insuring uninsured children: A randomized controlled trial. Pediatrics. 2016 Apr 1;137(4).

Link: https://www.publications.aap.org/pediatrics/article-abstract/137/4/e20153519/81477/Parent-Mentors-and-Insuring-Uninsured-Children-A?redirectedFrom=fulltext

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Public Insurance (Health Care Provider/Practice), Educational Material (Provider), PARENT_FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), PROFESSIONAL_CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver), PATIENT_CONSUMER, Peer Counselor, Parent Mentors

Intervention Results:

In the Kids’ HELP trial, the intervention was more effective than traditional outreach/enrollment in insuring uninsured minority children, resulting in 95% of children obtaining insurance vs. 68% of controls. The intervention also insured children faster, and was more effective in renewing coverage, improving access to medical and dental care, reducing out-of-pocket costs, achieving parental satisfaction and quality of care, and sustaining insurance after intervention cessation. This is the first RCT to evaluate the effectiveness of parent mentors in insuring uninsured children. Kids’ HELP could possibly save $12.1 to $14.1 billion. Parent mentors were more effective in improving access to primary, dental, and specialty care; reducing unmet needs, achieving parental satisfaction with care, and sustaining long-term coverage. Parent mentors resulted in lower out-of-pocket costs for doctor and sick visits, higher well-child care quality ratings, and higher levels of parental satisfaction and respect from children’s physicians.

Fuld J, Farag M, Weinstein J, Gale LB. Enrolling and retaining uninsured and underinsured populations in public health insurance through a service integration model in New York City. American Journal of Public Health. 2013 Feb;103(2):202-5.

Link: https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2012.300872

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Public Insurance (Health Care Provider/Practice), PROFESSIONAL_CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Collaboration with Local Agencies (State), Educational Material (caregiver), STATE, Multicomponent Approach

Intervention Results:

Since 2008, more than 5,000 children in the Early Intervention Program have been successfully enrolled and coverage renewed in Medicaid through the Service Integration Model. In 2008, the study team found that children in the Early Intervention Program had a 34% churning rate for Medicaid because of enrollment barriers and misconception of the Early Intervention Program as a replacement for Medicaid. By 2010, the churning rate for clients assisted through Office of Health Insurance Services was reduced from 34% to 8%. The Office of Health Insurance Services will modify the Service Integration Model to respond to New York State’s implementation of the Health Insurance Exchange required by the 2010 ACA. Partnerships across government programs and agencies offer opportunities to enroll hard-to-reach populations into public health insurance. The model reflects how government programs can work together to improve rates of enrollment and retention in public health insurance. The key elements of integration of program messages, data matching, and staff involvement allow for the model to be tailored to the specific needs of other government programs.

Guy GP, M Johnston E, Ketsche P, Joski P, Adams EK. The Role of Public and Private Insurance Expansions and Premiums for Low-income Parents. Medical Care. 2017 Mar 1;55(3):236-43.

Link: https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/wk/mcar/2017/00000055/00000003/art00007

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Public Insurance (Health Care Provider/Practice), NATIONAL, Policy/Guideline (National)

Intervention Results:

Cross-state analyses demonstrate that public expansions without premiums and special subsidized plan expansions had the largest effects on parental coverage and increased the likelihood of jointly insuring the parent and child. Expansions increased parental coverage by 2.5 percentage points and increased the likelihood of both parent and child being insured by 2.1 percentage points. Substantial variation was observed by type of expansion. Public expansions without premiums and special subsidized plan expansions had the largest effects on parental coverage and increased the likelihood of jointly insuring both the parent and child. Higher premiums were a substantial deterrent to parents’ insurance. Our findings suggest that premiums and the type of insurance expansion can have a substantial impact on the insurance status of the family. The most effective expansions for parental insurance coverage were those for traditional Medicaid coverage without premiums and for special subsidized plans that subsidized costs for individuals to purchase state-sponsored plans. These findings can help inform states as they continue to make decisions about expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act to cover all family members.

Harding RL, Hall JD, DeVoe J, Angier H, Gold R, Nelson C, Likumahuwa-Ackman S, Heintzman J, Sumic A, Cohen DJ. Maintaining public health insurance benefits: How primary care clinics help keep low-income patients insured. Patient Experience Journal. 2017;4(3):61-9.

Link: https://pxjournal.org/journal/vol4/iss3/11/

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Public Insurance (Health Care Provider/Practice), PROFESSIONAL_CAREGIVER, Educational Material (caregiver), Patient Navigation (Assistance), Outreach (Provider), Enrollment Assistance

Intervention Results:

Enrollment assistants are valuable resources, and CHCs are effective at helping patients with public health insurance. The enrollment assistants helped families understand the process and avoid mistakes and delays while patients valued their advice and their pragmatic, hands-on application assistance.

Hirschi M, Walter AW, Wilson K, Jankovsky K, Dworetzky B, Comeau M, Bachman SS. Access to care among children with disabilities enrolled in the MassHealth CommonHealth Buy-In program. Journal of Child Health Care. 2019 Mar;23(1):6-19.

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1367493518777310

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Public Insurance (Health Care Provider/Practice), Medicaid

Intervention Results:

This study suggests that the MassHealth CommonHealth Buy-In program improves access to care for children with disabilities by providing the benefits that were limited in scope or unavailable through other insurance before enrollment and by making available services more affordable. Parents reported that this increased access resulted in improvements in their child’s health or functioning, reduced stress on the parents and families, and reduced financial strain. Overall, many respondents appreciated the CommonHealth program. Despite these benefits, other families reported that they continued to face barriers in access to care for their children with disabilities. They reported difficulty in finding mental health or dental care, as many of these providers (as well as other specialists) did not accept MassHealth. Even with CommonHealth, families still had high out-of-pocket costs due to services that are not covered or high CommonHealth premiums. Families also struggled with complex paperwork requirements. Policy and administrative changes could improve the program and further increase access to care for children with complex, costly conditions. Adopting a Medicaid Buy-In program may be an effective way for other states to create a pathway to Medicaid for children with disabilities whose family income is too high for Medicaid and who have unmet needs and/or whose families incur high out-of-pocket costs for their care.

Jenkins JM. Healthy and Ready to Learn: Effects of a School‐Based Public Health Insurance Outreach Program for Kindergarten‐Aged Children. Journal of School Health. 2018 Jan;88(1):44-53.

Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/josh.12579

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Public Insurance (Health Care Provider/Practice), Provider Training/Education, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, CLASSROOM_SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, PROFESSIONAL_CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver), Outreach (School Staff)

Intervention Results:

With increased enrollment rates and well-child exam rates, findings demonstrate the potential benefits of using schools as a point of intervention in enrolling young children in public health insurance and as a source of trusted information for parents from low-income backgrounds. The initiative increased enrollment rates by 12.2% points and increased well-child exam rates by 8.6% points in the regression discontinuity design models, but not differences-in-differences, and did not significantly increase well-child visits. Findings demonstrate the potential benefits of using schools as a point of intervention in enrolling young children in public health insurance and as a source of trusted information for low-income parents.

Phillips MA, Rivera MD, Shoemaker JA, Minyard K. Georgia's utilization minigrant program: promoting Medicaid/CHIP outreach. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. 2010;21(4):1282-91.

Link: https://muse.jhu.edu/article/400769/summary

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Collaboration with Local Agencies (State), PROFESSIONAL_CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver), PATIENT_CONSUMER, Referrals, STATE, Mini Grants, Public Insurance (State)

Intervention Results:

Funded community-based organizations improved utilization of children’s health services by developing innovative staffing patterns, creating new data systems for scheduling appointments and maintaining records, and forging new collaborative relationships to leverage financial support. Responses suggest that the program improved levels of enrollment, appointment-setting and referrals for social and other services. Common facilitators and barriers to success and ways to address them were also identified. Elaboration on each of the facilitators of success led to the development of several recommendations as guidance for future outreach funding programs such as: staffing, data systems, collaboration and how to address incentives and barriers.

Ray JA, Detman LA, Chavez M, Gilbertson M, Berumen J. Improving Data, Enhancing Enrollment: Florida Covering Kids & Families CHIPRA Data System. Maternal and Child Health Journal. 2016 Apr;20(4):749-53.

Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10995-015-1889-5

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Collaboration with Local Agencies (State), Public Insurance (Health Care Provider/Practice), PROFESSIONAL_CAREGIVER, Outreach (caregiver), STATE, Data Collection System

Intervention Results:

The highest number of application submissions were through outreach at a child’s school or childcare facility, through a community-based organization, or through targeted outreach events. However, even though those strategies resulted in the largest number of application, approval and denial rates show which of these strategies (through a CHIPRA grant partner site or government agency) yielded the highest enrollments. This information can be further stratified by individual project partner to show which strategies are working best in that region. The improved data collection system of Cycle II enables FL-CKF to better monitor the efforts of project partners by tracking monthly progress toward grant deliverable goals.

Smith AJ, Chien AT. Adult-oriented health reform and children’s insurance and access to care: evidence from Massachusetts health reform. Maternal and child health journal. 2019 Aug;23(8):1008-24.

Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10995-019-02731-6

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Public Insurance (Health Care Provider/Practice), NATIONAL, Policy/Guideline (National)

Intervention Results:

Massachusetts health reform, the model for the ACA, reduced uninsurance and improved access to some types of care for children in the state. Expanding adult-oriented health access policies in MA was associated with a trend toward reduced uninsurance and improved access to specialty care for children overall at 5 years post-reform. For low-income children, health reform was associated with increased access to a personal doctor for children previously Medicaid-eligible and increased access to specialty care for children newly Medicaid-eligible.

Swartz JJ, Hainmueller J, Lawrence D, Rodriguez MI. Expanding prenatal care to unauthorized immigrant women and the effects on infant health. Obstetrics and gynecology. 2017 Nov;130(5):938.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5679477/

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Public Insurance (Health Care Provider/Practice), NATIONAL, Policy/Guideline (National), STATE, Prenatal Care Access

Intervention Results:

Expanding access to prenatal care coverage increased both utilization and quality of prenatal care, and women were more likely to receive adequate care and recommended preventive health services. After expansion of access to prenatal care, there was an increase in prenatal visits (7.2 more visits, 95% CI 6.46 to 7.98), receipt of adequate prenatal care (28% increased rate, CI 26 to 31), rates of diabetes screening (61% increased rate, CI 56 to 65) and fetal ultrasounds (74% increased rate, CI 72 to 77). Maternal access to prenatal care was also associated with an increased number of well-child visits (0.24 more visits, CI 0.07 to 0.41), increased rates of recommended screenings and vaccines, and reduced infant mortality (-1.04 per 1000, CI -1.45 to -0.62) and rates of extremely low birth weight (<1000g) (-1.5 per 1000, CI -2.58 to -0.53).

Wisk LE, Finkelstein JA, Toomey SL, Sawicki GS, Schuster MA, Galbraith AA. Impact of an individual mandate and other health reforms on dependent coverage for adolescents and young adults. Health services research. 2018 Jun;53(3):1581-99.

Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1475-6773.12723

NPM: 15: Continuous and Adequate Insurance
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PAYER, Expanded Insurance Coverage, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Public Insurance (Health Care Provider/Practice), NATIONAL, Policy/Guideline (National)

Intervention Results:

Findings suggest that an individual mandate and other reforms may enhance the effect of DCE in preventing loss of coverage among AYA. Implementation of DCE with other reforms was significantly associated with a 23% reduction in exit from dependent coverage among AYA compared to the reduction observed for DCE alone. Additionally, comprehensive reforms were associated with over two additional years of dependent coverage for the average AYA and a 33% increase in the odds of regaining dependent coverage after a prior loss. Findings suggest that an individual mandate and other reforms may enhance the effect of DCE in preventing loss of coverage among AYA. The joint effect of these policy levers is also associated with maintenance of dependent coverage until an older age and increased likelihood of regaining dependent coverage after an initial disenrollment. In addition to reductions in the odds of and time to dependent coverage exit, DCE was associated with further coverage gains for AYA in the form of regained dependent coverage.
   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.