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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Find Established Evidence


Displaying records 1 through 5 (5 total).

Riley, M., Laurie, A. R., Plegue, M. A., & Richardson, C. R. (2016). The adolescent “expanded medical home”: School-based health centers partner with a primary clinic to improve population health and mitigate social determinants of health. Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, 29(3), 339–347.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27170791

NPM: 11: Medical Home
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): SCHOOL, School-Based Health Centers, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Patient-Centered Medical Home, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Referrals, Peer Counselor

Intervention Results:

At baseline, patients seen at YHC/RAHS had higher compliance with most quality metrics compared with those seen at YHC only. The proportion of shared patients significantly increased because of the intervention (P < .001). Overall, patients seen in the expanded medical home had a higher likelihood of receiving quality metric services than patients in YHC only (odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.57-2.05) across all measures.

Brown, C. M., Perkins, J., Blust, A., & Kahn, R. (2015). A neighborhood-based approach to population health in the pediatric medical home. Journal of Community Health, 40(1), 1–11.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24923727

NPM: 11: Medical Home
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Patient-Centered Medical Home, CAREGIVER, Home Visit (caregiver), PATIENT/CONSUMER, Home Visits, Outreach (caregiver), Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, Enabling Services

Intervention Results:

Outcomes were timeliness of well child care and enrollment in home visiting. Time series analyses compared patients from the intervention neighborhood with a demographically similar neighborhood. Mean age at newborn visit decreased from 14.4 to 10.1 days of age. Attendance at 2- and 4-month well child visits increased from 68 to 79% and 35 to 59 %, respectively. Rates did not improve for infants from the comparison neighborhood. Confirmed enrollment in home visiting increased. After spread to 2 more clinics, 43 % of infants in the neighborhood were reached.

Tataw, D. B., Bazargan-Hejazi, S., & James, F. (2011). Health services utilization, satisfaction, and attachment to a regular source of care among participants in an urban health provider alliance. Journal of Health and Human Services Administration, 34(1), 109–141.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21847878

NPM: 11: Medical Home
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Patient-Centered Medical Home, Educational Material (Provider), Continuity of Care (Caseload), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), PATIENT/CONSUMER, Referrals, Other Education

Intervention Results:

The use of Physician Assistants and community health workers to expand community outreach, primary care services, pediatric sub-specialty care, and service coordination within and between care settings improved health services utilization, satisfaction with health services, parental self efficacy in navigating the health care system for their children, and service convenience for an at-risk population. Also, the use of Physician Assistants to provide pediatric sub-specialty services did not have a negative effect on parental satisfaction with a child's care.

Jaudes, K. P., Champagne, V., Harden, A., Masterson, J., Bilaver, L. A. (2012). Expanded medical home model works for children in foster care. Child Welfare, 91(1), 9–33.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22894013

NPM: 11: Medical Home
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Outreach (Provider), Patient-Centered Medical Home, Expert Support (Provider), STATE, Collaboration with Local Agencies (State), Collaboration with Local Agencies (Health Care Provider/Practice), Continuity of Care (Caseload)

Intervention Results:

This study demonstrates that the Medical Home model works for children in foster care providing better health outcomes in higher immunization rates.These children used the health care system more effectively and cost-effective as reflected in the higher utilization rates of primary care and well-child visits and lower utilization of emergency room care for children with chronic conditions.

Petersen, D. J., Bronstein, J., & Pass, M. A. (2002). Assessing the extent of medical home coverage among Medicaid-enrolled children. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 6(1), 59–66.

Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A:1014320301492

NPM: 11: Medical Home
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Patient-Centered Medical Home, Continuity of Care (Caseload), PATIENT/CONSUMER, Enabling Services

Intervention Results:

In general, Medicaid-enrolled children in Alabama did not meet our definition of medical home either before or after implementation of a primary care case management model. Only 11.8% of children saw a single provider and had a well child visit from that provider during the baseline year. A majority of children (49.9%) however had both a primary care provider and received a well child visit. Sixteen percent of children saw a primary care physician but received no identifiable well visit, while 11% had well child care but did not see a primary care physician. Of particular concern, 23% neither saw a primary care physician nor had a well child visit during the baseline year. These figures changed only slightly in the 26 counties examined before and after implementation of the primary care case management model.
   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.