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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Find Established Evidence


Displaying records 1 through 3 (3 total).

Cross D, Shaw T, Hadwen K, et al. Longitudinal impact of the cyber friendly schools program on adolescents’ cyberbullying behavior. Aggress Behav. 2016;42(2):166-180.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26351263

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, Peer-led Curricular Activities/Training, Training (Parent/Family), SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Meeting, Teacher/Staff Training, School Rules

Intervention Results:

Victimization - Cyberbullying

  • The intervention was associated with a steeper decline in the log odds of cybervictimization (p=0.028) between pretest and the first posttest. Trends in the log odds between the first posttest and the second posttest were similar (p=0.380). For involved students, the intervention had no impact on the frequency or extent of cyberbullying exposure.

Perpetration/Aggression - Cyberbullying

  • The intervention was associated with a steeper decline in the log odds of cyber perpetration (p=0.012) between pretest and the first posttest. Trends in the log odds between the first posttest and the second posttest were similar (p=0.165). For involved students, the intervention had no impact on the frequency or extent of cyberbullying perpetration.

Del Rey R, Casas JA, Ortega R. Impact of the ConRed program on different cyberbulling roles. Aggress Behav. 2016;42(2):123-135.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26351131

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Training, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media)

Intervention Results:

Victimization - Traditional Bullying

  • Comparing the intervention to the control group of cyber-victims, significant reductions were observed for traditional bullying victimization (p=0.008).
  • For cyberbully/victims, significant reductions were observed in traditional bullying victimization among boys (p=0.007).

Victimization - Cyberbullying

  • Comparing the intervention to the control group of cyber-victims, significant reductions were observed for cyberbullying victimization (p=0.03).
  • For cyberbully/victims, significant reductions were observed in cyberbullying victimization among boys (p=0.05).

Perpetration/Aggression - Cyberbullying

  • Comparing the intervention to the control group of cyber-aggressors, significant decrease was observed for cyberbullying aggression among boys (p=0.04).
  • Comparing the intervention to the control group of cyberbully/victims, significant decrease was observed for cyberbullying aggression (p=0.007).

Ortega-Ruiz R, Del Rey R, Casas JA. Knowing, building and living together on internet and social networks: The ConRed cyberbullying prevention program. Int J Conf Violence. 2012;6(2):302-312.

Link: http://www.ijcv.org/index.php/ijcv/article/view/250

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Training (Parent/Family), CLASSROOM, Adult-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Teacher/Staff Meeting, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media)

Intervention Results:

Victimization - Traditional Bullying

  • Comparing the intervention group to the control group, the level of traditional bullying victimization decreased significantly (p=0.011). This decrease occurred among both boys and girls (p<0.05), although the decrease was much greater among boys (p<0.01).

Victimization - Cyberbullying

  • Comparing the intervention group to the control group, the level of cyberbullying victimization decreased significantly (p=0.019). Subgroups analyses by sex showed no significant effects.

Perpetration/Aggression - Traditional Bullying

  • Comparing the intervention group to the control group, the level of traditional bullying aggression did not change significantly (p=0.882). However, subgroup analyses showed that the decrease was significant in boys (p<0.01), but not girls.

Perpetration/Aggression - Cyberbullying

  • Comparing the intervention group to the control group, the level of cyberbullying aggression decreased significantly (p=0.014). Subgroups analyses by sex showed no significant effects.
   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.