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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Displaying records 1 through 4 (4 total).

Menesini E, Codecasa E, Benelli B, Cowie H. Enhancing children's responsibility to take action against bullying: Evaluation of a befriending intervention in Italian middle schools. Aggress Behav. 2003;29(1):1-14.

Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ab.80012

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling, CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom)

Intervention Results:

Victimization - Traditional Bullying

  • Although the Victim scale increased in value in the control group, and decreased in the intervention group, the effect did not reach significance (p=0.19).

Perpetration/Aggression - Traditional Bullying

  • The Bully Scale increased in value in the control group, while it decreased in the intervention group. The interaction between time and group was significant (p<0.05). The increase in the control group is due mainly to the boys (p<0.05).

Menesini E, Nocentini A, Palladino BE. Empowering students against bullying and cyberbullying: Evaluation of an Italian peer-led model. Int J Conf Violence. 2012;6(2):313-320.

Link: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/233944925_Empowering_Students_Against_Bullying_andCyberbullying_Evaluation_of_an_Italian_Peer-led_Model

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling, CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), SCHOOL, Assembly, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media), POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS, COMMUNITY, Presentation/Meeting with Community Officials (School Boards, Administrators, Police), Event

Intervention Results:

Victimization - Traditional Bullying

  • Study 1: No significant main or interaction effects were found for victimization.
  • Study 2: For victimization, there was a significant interaction of time and group (p<0.01), showing a decrease over time in the intervention group as compared to the control group. Among all students in the intervention group, the intervention effect was found for both peer educators as well as other students in the intervention classes.

Victimization - Cyberbullying

  • Study 1: No significant main or interaction effects were found for cybervictimization.
  • Study 2: For cybervictimization, there was a significant interaction of time and group (p<0.05), showing a decrease over time in the intervention group as compared to the control group. Among all students in the intervention group, the intervention effect was found for both peer educators as well as other students in the intervention classes.

Perpetration/Aggression - Traditional Bullying

  • Study 1 No significant main or interaction effects were found for bullying.
  • Study 2: For bullying, there was a significant interaction of time and group (p<0.05), showing a decrease over time in the intervention group as compared to the control group. Among all students in the intervention group, the intervention effect was found for both peer educators as well as other students in the intervention classes.

Perpetration/Aggression - Cyberbullying

  • Study 1: Cyberbullying decreased significantly from pretest to posttest for the peer educator group only (not the awareness group or the control group) (p<0.05), and in particular for male peer educators (p<0.05).
  • Study 2: No significant intervention effect was found for cyberbullying.

Palladino BE, Nocentini A, Menesini E. Evidenceā€based intervention against bullying and cyberbullying: Evaluation of the NoTrap! program in two independent trials. Aggress Behav. 2016;42(2):194-206.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26879897

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling, CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), Peer-led Curricular Activities/Training, SCHOOL, Assembly, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media), POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS, COMMUNITY, Presentation/Meeting with Community Officials (School Boards, Administrators, Police), Event

Intervention Results:

Victimization - Traditional Bullying

  • Trial 1: Compared to the control group, the intervention group showed a significant decrease in victimization (p<0.001). The reduction was stable 6 months after the intervention ended.
  • Trial 2: Compared to the control group, the intervention, the intervention group showed a significant decrease in victimization (p<0.001). No significant interaction effect was found for time*group*gender (p=0.59).

Victimization - Cyberbullying

  • Trial 1: Compared to the control group, the intervention group showed a significant decrease in cybervictimization (p<0.001). The reduction was stable 6 months after the intervention ended.
  • Trial 2: Compared to the control group, the intervention group showed a significant decrease in cybervictimization (p<0.001). No significant interaction effect was found for time*group*gender (p=0.62).

Perpetration/Aggression - Traditional Bullying

  • Trial 1: Compared to the control group, the intervention group showed a significant decrease in bullying (p<0.001). The reduction was stable 6 months after the intervention ended.
  • Trial 2: Compared to the control group, the intervention, the intervention group showed a significant decrease in bullying (p<0.001). A significant interaction effect was found for gender. A significant decrease was found for both boys (p<0.001) and girls (p<0.001) in the intervention group, while the boys in the control group showed a significant increase (p<0.004) and the girls in the control group (p=0.12) did not change significantly.

Perpetration/Aggression - Cyberbullying

  • Trial 1: Compared to the control group, the intervention group showed a significant decrease in cyberbullying (p<0.001). The reduction was stable 6 months after the intervention ended.
  • Trial 2: Compared to the control group, the intervention, the intervention group showed a significant decrease in cyberbullying (p=0.02). No significant interaction effect was found for time*group*gender (p=0.18).

Palladino BE, Nocentini A, Menesini E. Online and offline peer led models against bullying and cyberbullying. Psicothema. 2012;24(4):634-639.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23079363

NPM: 9: Bullying
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): YOUTH, Peer-led Mentoring/Support Counseling, CLASSROOM, Presentation/meeting/information Session (Classroom), SCHOOL, Assembly, Media Campaign (Print Materials, Public Address System, Social Media), POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS, COMMUNITY, Presentation/Meeting with Community Officials (School Boards, Administrators, Police), Event

Intervention Results:

Victimization - Traditional Bullying

  • In comparison to the control group, the intervention group decreased significantly in victimization (p<0.01).
  • Among all students in the intervention group, the intervention effect was found for both peer educators as well as other students in the intervention classes.

Victimization - Cyberbullying

  • In comparison to the control group, the intervention group decreased significantly in cybervictimization (p<0.05).
  • Among all students in the intervention group, the intervention effect was found for both peer educators as well as other students in the intervention classes.

Perpetration/Aggression - Traditional Bullying

  • In comparison to the control group, the intervention group decreased significantly in bullying (p<0.05).
  • Among all students in the intervention group, the intervention effect was found for both peer educators as well as other students in the intervention classes.

Perpetration/Aggression - Cyberbullying

  • Comparing the intervention group to the control group, no significant effect was found for cyberbullying.
   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.