Skip Navigation

Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Find Established Evidence


Displaying records 1 through 3 (3 total).

Mackrain M, Dworkin PH, Harden BJ, Arbour M. HV CoIIN: Implementing quality improvement to achieve breakthrough change in developmental promotion, early detection, and intervention. MIECHV TACC, April 2015.

Link: https://georgetown.box.com/s/8q229hameb3038jxallodao9ss3q55lc

NPM: 6: Developmental Screening
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Home Visits, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Quality Improvement/Practice-Wide Intervention

Intervention Results:

The HV CoIIN’s theory of change includes a comprehensive approach for the development and implementation of reliable and effective systems for surveillance, screening, referral, follow-up, and intervention, with the goal of supporting all children’s development and getting vulnerable children access to appropriate and timely supports. Within the first 9 months, the HV CoIIN is generating promising movement toward breakthrough change across indicators, for example: By instituting mechanisms to track and provide ongoing surveillance of developmental and behavioral well-being, home visitors are asking over 80% of parents about their child’s development, behavior, or learning at every home visit. By standardizing and measuring efficacy of processes for developmental and behavioral screening, programs are screening approximately 70% of children at appropriate intervals. By incorporating protocol and practice for intentionally supporting children with a positive screen or parental concerns, home visitors are providing 80% or more of families with individualized support related to their child’s development, behavior, or learning within regularly scheduled home visits.

Green B, Tarte JM, Harrison PM, Nygren M, Sanders M. Results from a randomized trial of the Healthy Families Oregon accredited statewide program: early program impacts on parenting. Child Youth Serv Rev. 2014;44:288-298.

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740914002175

NPM: 6: Developmental Screening
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Home Visits, Collaboration with Local Agencies (State), STATE, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS

Intervention Results:

Results found that mothers assigned to the Healthy Families program group read more frequently to their young children, provided more developmentally supportive activities, and had less parenting stress. Children of these mothers were more likely to have received developmental screenings, and were somewhat less likely to have been identified as having a developmental challenge. Families with more baseline risk had better outcomes in some areas; however, generally there were not large differences in outcomes across a variety of subgroups of families.

Minkovitz CS, Hughart N, Strobino D, et al. A practice-based intervention to enhance quality of care in the first 3 years of life: the Healthy Steps for Young Children Program. JAMA. 2003;290(23):3081- 3091.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14679271

NPM: 6: Developmental Screening
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Home Visits, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Educational Material (Provider), Expert Support (Provider), Screening Tool Implementation Training, Office Systems Assessments and Implementation Training, Data Collection Training for Staff

Intervention Results:

Percentage of children with developmental assessments was 83.1% for intervention and 41.4% for control group (OR=8.00; 95% CI=6.69, 9.56; P<.001)
   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.