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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 20 (21 total).

Ahlers-Schmidt, C. R., Kuhlmann, S., Kuchlmann, Z., Schunn, C., & Rosell, J. (2014-B). To improve safe-sleep practices, more emphasis should be placed on removing unsafe items from the crib. Clinical Pediatrics, 53(13), 1285–1287. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Educational Material (Provider)
Intervention Description: A Safe Sleep Toolkit was developed to improve consistency in safe sleep communication between health providers and parents. The toolkit was implemented at two resident physician clinics, obstetric and pediatric, and included: 1) parent checklist regarding sleep position, location, environment, and intentions to share information; 2) a brief health care provider script; and 3) nationally available resources.
Study Design: Completion of checklist at clinic visit
Setting: Obstetric and pediatric clinics
Target Audience: Expectant and new parents
Data Source: Checklist
Sample Size: 309 parents
Age Range: Infant

Goodstein, M. H., Bell, T., & Krugman, S. D. (2015). Improving infant sleep safety through a comprehensive hospital-based program. Clinical Pediatrics, 54(3), 212–221. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): HOSPITAL, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Sleep Environment Modification, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Educational Material (Provider), Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, Guideline Change and Implementation
Intervention Description: We evaluated a comprehensive hospital-based infant safe sleep education program on parental education and safe sleep behaviors in the home using a cross-sectional survey of new parents at hospital discharge (HD) and 4-month follow-up (F/U).
Conclusion: Reinforcing the infant sleep safety message through intensive hospital-based education improves parental compliance with sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction guidelines.
Study Design: Quasi-experimental nonequivalent control group design
Setting: Hospital, postpartum maternity units
Target Audience: Nurses + New parents
Data Source: Cross-sectional survey of parents at time of hospital discharge and at 4-month well-child visit
Sample Size: 1,092 in hospital sample 490 at 4-month follow-up
Age Range: Infant

Mason, B., Ahlers-Schmidt, C. R., & Schunn, C. (2013). Improving safe sleep environments for well newborns in the hospital setting. Clinical Pediatrics, 52(10), 969–975. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, Provider Training/Education, Educational Material (Provider)
Intervention Description: The purpose of this study was to improve sleep position and environment in the hospital.
Conclusion: Using a multifaceted approach significantly improved infant safe sleep practice in the hospital setting.
Study Design: Pre-post intervention
Setting: Wesley Medical Center postpartum units
Target Audience: Nursing staff and mothers of infants
Data Source: Observation of sleep environment in hospital; follow-up parent survey
Sample Size: Baseline in hospital n=144 Post-intervention in hospital n=249 Parent survey n=101
Age Range: Infant

Shaefer, S. J., Herman, S. E., Frank, S. J., Adkins, M., & Terhaar, M. (2010). Translating infant safe sleep evidence into nursing practice. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing, 39(6), 618–626. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, CAREGIVER, Educational Material (caregiver), Provider Training/Education, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital)
Intervention Description: The authors describe a 4-year demonstration project (2004-2007) to reduce infant deaths related to sleep environments by changing attitudes and practices among nurses who work with African American parents and caregivers in urban Michigan hospitals.
Conclusion: Following the policy change effort, nurses changed their behavior and placed infants on the back to sleep.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Setting: 7 maternity wards in urban hospitals in MI
Target Audience: Nursing staff and parents
Data Source: Crib audit; infant observation
Sample Size: Baseline: n=579 Follow-up: n=692
Age Range: Infant

Voos, K. C., Terreros, A., Larimore, P., Leick-Rude, M. K., & Park, N. (2015). Implementing safe sleep practices in a neonatal intensive care unit. The Journal of Maternal-Fetal Neonatal Medicine. Doi:10.3109/14767058.2014.964679. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): HOSPITAL, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Quality Improvement, Continuing Education of Hospital Providers, Sleep Environment Modification, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, Provider Training/Education, CAREGIVER, Educational Material (caregiver)
Intervention Description: The dual aims of this project were to develop a safe sleep educational model for our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and to increase the percentage of eligible infants in a safe sleep environment.
Conclusion: With formal staff and family education, optional wearable blanket, and data sharing, safe sleep compliance increased and patient safety improved.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Setting: NICU
Target Audience: Neonatal nurses; staff Parents of newborns
Data Source: Crib audit/infant observation
Sample Size: 28 families at baseline 26 families at follow-up
Age Range: Infant

Moon RY, Calabrese T, Aird L. Reducing the risk of sudden infant death syndrome in child care and changing provider practices: lessons learned from a demonstration project. Pediatrics. 2008;122(4):788-798. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education
Intervention Description: The goal was to evaluate, through an American Academy of Pediatrics demonstration project, the effectiveness of a curriculum and train-the-trainer model in changing child care providers' behaviors regarding safe infant sleep practices.
Conclusion: A sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction curriculum using a train-the-trainer model is effective in improving the knowledge and practices of child care providers.
Study Design: Cluster RCT
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: California, Louisiana, Montana, and Pennsylvania
Target Audience: Child care professionals (child care facility directors and child care providers)
Data Source: Infant observation
Sample Size: Intervention  Initial (n=328)  Follow-up (n=282) Control  Initial (n=285)  Follow-up (n=253)
Age Range: Not specified

Colson ER, Joslin SC. Changing nursery practice gets inner-city infants in the supine position for sleep. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2002;156(7):717-720. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education
Intervention Description: To determine whether an educational intervention to change nursery practice would result in more inner-city parents placing their infants in the supine position for sleep.
Conclusion: After an educational intervention to change practice in a well-newborn nursery, many more parents reported placing their infants in the supine position for sleep,
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Yale-New Haven Hospital (New Haven, CT); Pediatric Primary Care center of the Yale-New Haven Hospital
Target Audience: Infants in the well-newborn nursery during the postpartum stay; Parents of infants at the infants’ 2-week health supervision visit
Data Source: Infant observation and Parent report
Sample Size: Baseline (n=100) Follow-up (n=100)
Age Range: Not specified

Gelfer P, Cameron R, Masters K, Kennedy KA. Integrating "Back to Sleep" recommendations into neonatal ICU practice. Pediatrics. 2013;131(4):e1264-1270. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Provision of Safe Sleep Item, Assessment (Provider), HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Crib Card, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Assessment (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)
Intervention Description: The aims of this project were to increase the percentage of infants following safe sleep practices in the NICU before discharge and to determine if improving compliance with these practices would influence parent behavior at home.
Conclusion: Multifactorial interventions improved compliance with safe sleep practices in the NICU and at home.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital NICU in Houston, TX
Target Audience: Infants in open cribs eligible for safe sleep practices; Parents of infants after discharge
Data Source: Crib audit/infant observation; Parent report
Sample Size: Baseline (n=62) Follow-up (n=79); Baseline (n=66) Follow-up (n=98)
Age Range: Not specified

Geyer JE, Smith PK, Kair LR. Safe sleep for pediatric inpatients. J Spec Pediatr Nurs. 2016;21(3):119-130. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Crib Card, Sleep Environment Modification, Promotional Event, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS, COMMUNITY, Social Media, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Visual Display (Community)
Intervention Description: To improve sleep environment safety for inpatient infants.
Conclusion: Staff education, swaddle sleep sacks, and bedside storage containers were associated with improved sleep safety among pediatric inpatients at our institution and may help at other institutions.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: No
Setting: University of Iowa Children’s Hospital
Target Audience: Infants less than 1 year of age developmentally ready for a crib and asleep
Data Source: Crib audit/infant observation
Sample Size: Baseline (n=22) Follow-up 1 (not reported) Follow-up 2 (n=37) Follow-up 3 (n=18)
Age Range: Not specified

Hill SA, Hjelmeland B, Johannessen NM, Irgens LM, Skjaerven R. Changes in parental risk behaviour after an information campaign against sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in Norway. Acta Paediatr. 2004;93(2):250-254. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Provision of Safe Sleep Item, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS, NATIONAL, Campaign, Mass Media, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)
Intervention Description: To assess parental risk behaviour before and after a sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) information campaign with special emphasis on associations with maternal age, education, marital status and birth order.
Conclusion: Non-supine sleeping decreased to a level that has never been reported before. In future campaigns, subgroup-specific measures may be needed.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: N/A
Target Audience: All mothers registered with the Medical Birth Registry of Norway as having given birth between Oct and Nov 1998 and Oct and Nov 1999 without a pathological condition
Data Source: Mother report
Sample Size: Baseline (n=5539) Follow-up (n=4143)
Age Range: Not specified

Hwang SS, O'Sullivan A, Fitzgerald E, Melvin P, Gorman T, Fiascone JM. Implementation of safe sleep practices in the neonatal intensive care unit. J Perinatol. 2015;35(10):862-866. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, HOSPITAL, Crib Card, Visual Display (Hospital), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver)
Intervention Description: To increase the percentage of eligible infants engaging in safe sleep practices (SSP) in two level III neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in the Boston, Massachusetts area.
Conclusion: Safe infant sleep practices can be integrated into the routine care of preterm infants in the NICU. Modeling SSP to families far in advance of hospital discharge may improve adherence to SSP at home and reduce the risk of sleep-related morbidity and mortality in this vulnerable population of infants.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Two level III NICUs at South Shore Hospital and St Elizabeth’s Medical Center in MA
Target Audience: Infants eligible for safe sleep practices as determined by an algorithm and clinical status of the infant
Data Source: Crib audit/infant observation
Sample Size: Baseline (n=112) Follow-up (n=118)
Age Range: Not specified

Kuhlmann S, Ahlers-Schmidt CR, Lukasiewicz G, Truong TM. Interventions to improve safe sleep among hospitalized infants at eight children's hospitals. Hosp Pediatr. 2016;6(2):88-94. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Provision of Safe Sleep Item, HOSPITAL, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Sleep Environment Modification, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Attestation (Provider)
Intervention Description: The purpose of this study was to improve safe sleep practices for infants in nonneonatal pediatric units with implementation of specific interventions.
Conclusion: Implementation of site-specific interventions seems to improve overall safe sleep in inpatient pediatric units, although continued improvement is needed. Specifically, extra items are persistently left in the sleeping environment.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Eight children’s hospitals
Target Audience: Infants aged 0 to 6 months admitted to the general pediatric unit (excluding infants in the NICUs, PICUs, and maternal fetal units)
Data Source: Crib audit/infant observation
Sample Size: Baseline (n=234) Follow-up (n=210)
Age Range: Not specified

Macklin JR, Gittelman MA, Denny SA, Southworth H, Arnold MW. The EASE quality improvement project: improving safe sleep practices in Ohio children's hospitals. Pediatrics. 2016;138(4). Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Sleep Environment Modification, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver)
Intervention Description: This project assessed the change in infant safe sleep practices within 6 children's hospitals after the implementation of a statewide quality improvement program.
Conclusion: Multifactorial interventions by hospitalist teams in a multi-institutional program within 1 state's children's hospitals improved observed infant safe sleep behaviors and family report of safe sleep education. These behavior changes may lead to more appropriate safe sleep practices at home.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Six children’s hospitals without internal maternity centers or wellbaby nurseries (academic tertiary or quaternary care institutions) in OH
Target Audience: Infants ≤1 year of age admitted to the general medical/surgical units who were not awake during the audit (excluding those in the ICUs, with tracheostomies, ventilator or noninvasive ventilator dependence, recent spinal surgeries, or upper airway anatomic abnormalities)
Data Source: Crib audit/infant observation
Sample Size: Baseline (n=856) Follow-up (n=189)
Age Range: Not specified

McMullen SL, Fioravanti ID, Brown K, Carey MG. Safe sleep for hospitalized infants. MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs. 2016;41(1):43-50. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Provision of Safe Sleep Item, Attestation (Provider), HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Crib Card, Visual Display (Hospital), Sleep Environment Modification, Promotional Event, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Attestation (caregiver)
Intervention Description: The purpose of this quality improvement project was to promote the AAP safe sleep recommendations and provide appropriate role modeling of these recommendations for hemodynamically stable infants throughout their hospital stay.
Conclusion: There was inconsistency between nursing knowledge and practice about safe infant sleep. Nurses were aware of the AAP recommendations, but it took time to achieve close to full compliance in changing clinical practice. Observation was an important part of this initiative to reinforce knowledge and role model best practice for parents.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Golisano Children’s Hospital at the University of Rochester in NY
Target Audience: Hemodynamically stable infants less than 1 year of age in the mother-baby unit and nine pediatric units
Data Source: Crib audit/infant observation
Sample Size: Baseline (n=65) Follow-up (n=60)
Age Range: Not specified

Rocca Rivarola M, Reyes P, Henson C, et al. Impact of an educational intervention to improve adherence to the recommendations on safe infant sleep. Arch Argent Pediatr. 2016;114(3):223-231. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Educational Material (Provider), HOSPITAL, Crib Card, Visual Display (Hospital), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)
Intervention Description: To determine the impact, at 60 days of life, of an educational intervention conducted in maternity centers aimed at improving adherence to the recommendations on safe infant sleep.
Conclusion: The educational intervention was useful to improve adherence to the recommendations on safe sleep at 60 days of life: using the supine position and breastfeeding improved, and the rate of co-sleeping decreased. No changes were observed in the number of household members who smoke, bedroom sharing, and pacifier use.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Hospital Municipal Comodoro Meisner and Hospital Universitario Austral
Target Audience: Live newborns with >36 gestation weeks born in two hospitals whose mothers lived in the District of Pilar without major congenital malformations and/or hospitalization in the NICU for more than 10 days
Data Source: Caregiver report
Sample Size: Baseline (n=251) Follow-up (n=248)
Age Range: Not specified

Rowe AD, Sisterhen LL, Mallard E, et al. Integrating safe sleep practices into a pediatric hospital: outcomes of a quality improvement project. J Pediatr Nurs. 2016;31(2):e141-147. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Attestation (Provider), HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Sleep Environment Modification, CAREGIVER, Educational Material (caregiver)
Intervention Description: A quality improvement project for implementing safe sleep practices (SSP) was conducted at a large, U.S children's hospital.
Conclusion: Infant safe sleep practices have the potential to reduce infant mortality.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: No
Setting: A tertiary care children’s hospital in AR
Target Audience: Infants 0-12 months in intensive care and medical-surgical units caring asleep at the time of the audit
Data Source: Crib audit/infant observation
Sample Size: Baseline (n=398) Follow-up (n=498)
Age Range: Not specified

Shadman KA, Wald ER, Smith W, Coller RJ. Improving safe sleep practices for hospitalized infants. Pediatrics. 2016;138(3). Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provision of Safe Sleep Item, Provider Training/Education, HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Visual Display (Hospital), Sleep Environment Modification, CAREGIVER
Intervention Description: This quality improvement study aimed to increase adherence to SSPs for infants admitted to a children's hospital general care unit between October 2013 and December 2014.
Conclusion: Sustained improvements in hospital SSPs were achieved through this quality improvement initiative, with opportunity for continued improvement. Nurse knowledge increased during the intervention. It is uncertain whether these findings translate to changes in caregiver home practices after discharge.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: No
Setting: American Family Children’s Hospital in WI
Target Audience: Infants <12 months admitted to medical and surgical units; Caregivers of infants <6 months after hospital discharge
Data Source: Crib audit/infant observation; Caregiver report
Sample Size: Baseline (n=59) Follow-up (n=257); Baseline (n=56) Follow-up (n=48)
Age Range: Not specified

Shaefer SJ, Herman SE, Frank SJ, Adkins M, Terhaar M. Translating infant safe sleep evidence into nursing practice. J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2010;39(6):618-626. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), CAREGIVER, Educational Material (caregiver)
Intervention Description: The authors describe a 4-year demonstration project (2004-2007) to reduce infant deaths related to sleep environments by changing attitudes and practices among nurses who work with African American parents and caregivers in urban Michigan hospitals.
Conclusion: Following the policy change effort, nurses changed their behavior and placed infants on the back to sleep.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Seven urban hospitals in MI
Target Audience: Healthy newborn infants in cribs at the time of the audit B
Data Source: Crib audit/infant observation
Sample Size: Baseline (n=579) Follow-up (n=692)
Age Range: Not specified

Srivatsa B, Eden AN, Mir MA. Infant sleep position and SIDS: a hospital-based interventional study. J Urban Health. 1999;76(3):314-321. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, HOSPITAL, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Visual Display (Hospital)
Intervention Description: To determine infant sleep positioning practices and SIDS awareness before and after a hospital-based Back to Sleep campaign.
Conclusion: The Back to Sleep campaign was effective in our hospital setting. Our data indicate the need for special targeting of young, unmarried, and non-breast-feeding mothers. Fear of choking remains an important deterrent to proper infant sleep positioning.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Pediatric ambulatory care center of Wyckoff Heights Medical Center in NY
Target Audience: Mothers of healthy term infants 6 months and younger born in the hospital and attending the pediatric outpatient clinics
Data Source: Mother report
Sample Size: Baseline (n=250) Follow-up (n=250)
Age Range: Not specified

Voos KC, Terreros A, Larimore P, Leick-Rude MK, Park N. Implementing safe sleep practices in a neonatal intensive care unit. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2015;28(14):1637-1640. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Assessment (Provider), HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Sleep Environment Modification
Intervention Description: The dual aims of this project were to develop a safe sleep educational model for our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and to increase the percentage of eligible infants in a safe sleep environment.
Conclusion: With formal staff and family education, optional wearable blanket, and data sharing, safe sleep compliance increased and patient safety improved.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: No
Setting: The Children’s Mercy Hospital NICU in MO
Target Audience: Safe sleep eligible infants (medically stable and transitioned to open cribs)
Data Source: Crib audit/infant observation
Sample Size: Baseline (n=28) Follow-up (n=26)
Age Range: Not specified

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.