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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Find Established Evidence


Displaying records 1 through 3 (3 total).

Geyer JE, Smith PK, Kair LR. Safe sleep for pediatric inpatients. J Spec Pediatr Nurs. 2016;21(3):119-130.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27221207

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Crib Card, Visual Display, Sleep Environment Modification, Promotional Event, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS, COMMUNITY, Visual Display, Social Media, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

Between baseline and a year after the initiation of the intervention, the rate of supine positioning increased from 82% to 95%, but the increase was not statistically significant (p=0.183). From baseline to a year following the intervention, the rate of supine positioning remained stable at 83% (p=1.000).

Hill SA, Hjelmeland B, Johannessen NM, Irgens LM, Skjaerven R. Changes in parental risk behaviour after an information campaign against sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in Norway. Acta Paediatr. 2004;93(2):250-254.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15046283

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Provision of Safe Sleep Item, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS, NATIONAL, Campaign, Mass Media, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)

Intervention Results:

The prevalence of non-supine sleep position decreased significantly from 33.7% before the campaign to 13.6% after (RR=0.40, 95% CI: 0.37-0.44). The decrease was significant by maternal education, cohabitation, birth order, and maternal age.

McCulloch K, Dahl S, Johnson S, Burd L, Klug MG, Beal JR. Prevalence of SIDS risk factors: before and after the "Back to Sleep" campaign in North Dakota Caucasian and American Indian infants. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2000;39(7):403-410.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10914305

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Campaign, NATIONAL, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS

Intervention Results:

Comparing before and after the campaign, combining American Indian and Caucasian infants, there was a significant increase in supine position from 17.3% to 67.0% (OR=0.103, 95% CI: 0.070-0.151). The increase was significant among Caucasian infants from 12.0% to 68.6% (OR=0.603, 95% CI: 0.059-0.099). For American Indian infants, there was a non-significant increase from 37.9% to 54.8% (OR: 0.502, 95% CI: 0.212-1.19).
   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.