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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Find Established Evidence


Displaying records 1 through 5 (5 total).

Goodstein, M. H., Bell, T., & Krugman, S. D. (2015). Improving infant sleep safety through a comprehensive hospital-based program. Clinical Pediatrics, 54(3), 212–221. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): HOSPITAL, PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), Training (Parent/Family), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Sleep Environment Modification, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Educational Material (Provider), Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, Guideline Change and Implementation
Intervention Description: We evaluated a comprehensive hospital-based infant safe sleep education program on parental education and safe sleep behaviors in the home using a cross-sectional survey of new parents at hospital discharge (HD) and 4-month follow-up (F/U).
Conclusion: Reinforcing the infant sleep safety message through intensive hospital-based education improves parental compliance with sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction guidelines.
Study Design: Quasi-experimental nonequivalent control group design
Setting: Hospital, postpartum maternity units
Target Audience: Nurses + New parents
Data Source: Cross-sectional survey of parents at time of hospital discharge and at 4-month well-child visit
Sample Size: 1,092 in hospital sample 490 at 4-month follow-up
Age Range: Infant

Mason, B., Ahlers-Schmidt, C. R., & Schunn, C. (2013). Improving safe sleep environments for well newborns in the hospital setting. Clinical Pediatrics, 52(10), 969–975. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PARENT/FAMILY, Notification/Information Materials (Online Resources, Information Guide), PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, Provider Training/Education, Educational Material (Provider)
Intervention Description: The purpose of this study was to improve sleep position and environment in the hospital.
Conclusion: Using a multifaceted approach significantly improved infant safe sleep practice in the hospital setting.
Study Design: Pre-post intervention
Setting: Wesley Medical Center postpartum units
Target Audience: Nursing staff and mothers of infants
Data Source: Observation of sleep environment in hospital; follow-up parent survey
Sample Size: Baseline in hospital n=144 Post-intervention in hospital n=249 Parent survey n=101
Age Range: Infant

Shaefer, S. J., Herman, S. E., Frank, S. J., Adkins, M., & Terhaar, M. (2010). Translating infant safe sleep evidence into nursing practice. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing, 39(6), 618–626. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, CAREGIVER, Educational Material (caregiver), Provider Training/Education, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital)
Intervention Description: The authors describe a 4-year demonstration project (2004-2007) to reduce infant deaths related to sleep environments by changing attitudes and practices among nurses who work with African American parents and caregivers in urban Michigan hospitals.
Conclusion: Following the policy change effort, nurses changed their behavior and placed infants on the back to sleep.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Setting: 7 maternity wards in urban hospitals in MI
Target Audience: Nursing staff and parents
Data Source: Crib audit; infant observation
Sample Size: Baseline: n=579 Follow-up: n=692
Age Range: Infant

Voos, K. C., Terreros, A., Larimore, P., Leick-Rude, M. K., & Park, N. (2015). Implementing safe sleep practices in a neonatal intensive care unit. The Journal of Maternal-Fetal Neonatal Medicine. Doi:10.3109/14767058.2014.964679. Access Abstract

NPM: 7-1: Child Safety/Injury (0-9 years) 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): HOSPITAL, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Quality Improvement, Continuing Education of Hospital Providers, Sleep Environment Modification, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, Provider Training/Education, CAREGIVER, Educational Material (caregiver)
Intervention Description: The dual aims of this project were to develop a safe sleep educational model for our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and to increase the percentage of eligible infants in a safe sleep environment.
Conclusion: With formal staff and family education, optional wearable blanket, and data sharing, safe sleep compliance increased and patient safety improved.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Setting: NICU
Target Audience: Neonatal nurses; staff Parents of newborns
Data Source: Crib audit/infant observation
Sample Size: 28 families at baseline 26 families at follow-up
Age Range: Infant

Moon, R. Y., Hauck, F. R., Colson, E. R., Kellams, A. L., Geller, N. L., Heeren, T., & Corwin, M. J. (2017). The effect of nursing quality improvement and mobile health interventions on infant sleep practices: a randomized clinical trial. Jama, 318(4), 351-359. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner, Quality Improvement/Practice-Wide Intervention
Intervention Description: To assess the effectiveness of 2 interventions separately and combined to promote infant safe sleep practices compared with control interventions.
Conclusion: Among mothers of healthy term newborns, a mobile health intervention, but not a nursing quality improvement intervention, improved adherence to infant safe sleep practices compared with control interventions. Whether widespread implementation is feasible or if it reduces sudden and unexpected infant death rates remains to be studied.

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.