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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 6 (6 total).

Colson ER, Rybin D, Smith LA, Colton T, Lister G, Corwin MJ. Trends and factors associated with infant sleeping position: the national infant sleep position study, 1993-2007. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009;163(12):1122-1128. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Assessment, Sleep Environment Modification
Intervention Description: N/A
Primary Outcomes: Infant usually placed to sleep in the supine position.
Conclusion: Since 2001 supine sleep has reached a plateau, and there continue to be racial disparities in both sleep practice and death rates. There have been changes in factors associated with sleep position and maternal attitudes about issues such as comfort and choking concerns may account for much of the racial disparity in practice. To decrease SIDS, we must ensure that public health measures reach the populations at risk and include messages that address concerns about infant comfort or choking in the supine position.
Study Design: National Infant Sleep Position Study (NISP): Annual nationally representative telephone surveys.
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: 48 contiguous states of the United States.
Data Source: Interviews
Sample Size: N/A
Age Range: N/A

Colson ER, Bergman DM, Shapiro E, Leventhal JH. Position for newborn sleep: associations with parents' perceptions of their nursery experience. Birth. 2001;28(4):249-253. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Assessment, Sleep Environment Modification
Intervention Description: The objective of this study was to examine the association between the perceptions of inner city parents about teaching and modeling during the postpartum period of infant sleeping position, and their choice of sleeping position for their infants.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: Perceptions by parents of instructions from a doctor or a nurse of the position in which the infants were placed in the nursery were associated with the position parents reported placing their infants to sleep at home. Efforts to promote the supine sleeping position in the inner-city setting should address both practices and education provided to parents in the nursery during the postpartum hospital stay and should be sufficiently powerful to align their perceptions of the postpartum experience with current American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations.
Study Design: Survey based on a convenience sample
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Urban Primary Care Center
Data Source: A convenience sample of parents of 100 healthy infants who came for the 2-week well-child visit at an urban primary care center were invited to complete a questionnaire and to report on the position in which infants were placed for sleep.
Sample Size: 100 healthy infants
Age Range: Infants 2 weeks old

Hwang SS, Rybin DV, Heeren TC, Colson ER, Corwin MJ. Trust in sources of advice about infant care practices: the SAFE study. Matern Child Health J. 2016:1-9. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Assessment, Quality Improvement/Practice-Wide Intervention, Sleep Environment Modification
Intervention Description: (1) Determine the prevalence of maternal trust in advice sources on infant care practices; (2) Investigate the association of maternal and infant characteristics with trust in advice sources on infant care practices. Using probability sampling methods, we recruited mothers from 32 U.S. maternity hospitals with oversampling of Black and Hispanic women resulting in a nationally representative sample of mothers of infants aged 2-6 months. Survey questions assessed maternal trust in advice sources (physicians, nurses, family, friends, and media) regarding infant care practices including infant sleep practices (sleep position, bed sharing, and pacifier use), feeding, and vaccination.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: for Practice Maternal trust in advice about infant care practices varied significantly by source. A better understanding of which advice sources are most trusted by mothers, as well as the factors associated with maternal trust, may guide the development of more effective strategies to improve adherence to health promoting infant care practices.
Study Design: Survey
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Maternity Hospitals
Data Source: Recruited Mothers from Maternity Hospitals
Sample Size: N/A
Age Range: N/A

D’Halluin AR, Roussey M, Branger B, Venisse A, Pladys P. Formative evaluation to improve prevention of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS): a prospective study. Acta Paediatr. 2011;100(10):e147-e151. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Assessment (caregiver)
Intervention Description: To evaluate formative evaluation, a pedagogic method that sensitizes mothers to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), as a new way to improve prevention of SIDS.
Conclusion: Formative evaluation using an educative questionnaire could improve maternal awareness on SIDS risk factors and their compliance with recommendations about SIDS prevention.
Study Design: RCT
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Maternity department of the Rennes University Hospital
Target Audience: Mothers hospitalized during the immediate postpartum period between Jun 19 and Aug 28, 2005 who were not hospitalized for abnormal or high-risk pregnancies and did not have newborns hospitalized in neonatology
Data Source: Mother report
Sample Size: Baseline (n=320) Follow-up (n=292)  Intervention (n=148)  Control (n=144)
Age Range: Not specified

Gelfer P, Cameron R, Masters K, Kennedy KA. Integrating "Back to Sleep" recommendations into neonatal ICU practice. Pediatrics. 2013;131(4):e1264-1270. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Provision of Safe Sleep Item, Assessment (Provider), HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), Crib Card, CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Assessment (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver)
Intervention Description: The aims of this project were to increase the percentage of infants following safe sleep practices in the NICU before discharge and to determine if improving compliance with these practices would influence parent behavior at home.
Conclusion: Multifactorial interventions improved compliance with safe sleep practices in the NICU and at home.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital NICU in Houston, TX
Target Audience: Infants in open cribs eligible for safe sleep practices; Parents of infants after discharge
Data Source: Crib audit/infant observation; Parent report
Sample Size: Baseline (n=62) Follow-up (n=79); Baseline (n=66) Follow-up (n=98)
Age Range: Not specified

Voos KC, Terreros A, Larimore P, Leick-Rude MK, Park N. Implementing safe sleep practices in a neonatal intensive care unit. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2015;28(14):1637-1640. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Assessment (Provider), HOSPITAL, Quality Improvement, Policy/Guideline (Hospital), CAREGIVER, Education/Training (caregiver), Educational Material (caregiver), Sleep Environment Modification
Intervention Description: The dual aims of this project were to develop a safe sleep educational model for our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and to increase the percentage of eligible infants in a safe sleep environment.
Conclusion: With formal staff and family education, optional wearable blanket, and data sharing, safe sleep compliance increased and patient safety improved.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: No
Setting: The Children’s Mercy Hospital NICU in MO
Target Audience: Safe sleep eligible infants (medically stable and transitioned to open cribs)
Data Source: Crib audit/infant observation
Sample Size: Baseline (n=28) Follow-up (n=26)
Age Range: Not specified

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.