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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Find Established Evidence


Displaying records 1 through 4 (4 total).

Colson ER, Levenson S, Rybin D, et al. Barriers to following the supine sleep recommendation among mothers at four centers for the Women, Infants, and Children Program. Pediatrics. 2006;118(2):e243-e250. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Access, Sleep Environment Modification
Intervention Description: The risk for sudden infant death syndrome in black infants is twice that of white infants, and their parents are less likely to place them in the supine position for sleep. We previously identified barriers for parents to follow recommendations for sleep position. Our objective with this study was to quantify these barriers, particularly among low-income, primarily black mothers.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: We identified specific barriers to placing infants in the supine position for sleep (lack of or wrong advice, lack of trust in providers, knowledge and concerns about safety and comfort) in low-income, primarily black mothers that should be considered when designing interventions to get more infants onto their back for sleep.
Study Design: Survey
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Women, Infants, and Children Program centers in Boston, Massachusetts, Dallas, Texas, Los Angeles, California, and New Haven, Connecticut.
Data Source: Participant Testimony
Sample Size: 671 mothers
Age Range: N/A

Herman S, Adkins M, Moon RY. Knowledge and beliefs of African-American and American Indian parents and supporters about infant safe sleep. J Community Health. 2015;40(1):12-19. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Group Education, Access, Community-Based Group Education, Sleep Environment Modification
Intervention Description: To investigate, by using qualitative methods, beliefs among African-American and American Indian families about infant safe sleep practices, barriers to acceptance of prevention recommendations, and more effective messaging strategies.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: Adherence with safe sleep recommendations may be enhanced if health care providers and educational materials discussed rationale underlying recommendations and addressed common parental concerns. It may be beneficial to target educational interventions towards fathers, as they may be untapped sources in implementing safe sleep practices.
Study Design: N/A
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Focus Groups
Data Source: Mother and supporters participating in focus groups
Sample Size: 73 participants
Age Range: Mean age for the participants was 24.9 years for the mothers and 30.7 years for the supporters, and mean age for the children was 5.6 months for both groups.

Gaydos LM, Blake SC, Gazmararian JA, Woodruff W, Thompson WW, Dalmida SG. Revisiting safe sleep recommendations for African-American infants: why current counseling is insufficient. Matern Child Health J. 2015;19(3):496-503. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Family-Based Interventions, Access, Sleep Environment Modification
Intervention Description: This study was intended to better understand how low-income, African-American mothers understand and act upon safe sleep recommendations for newborns and how providers counsel these mothers. We conducted focus groups with 60 African-American, low-income, first-time mothers and telephone interviews with 20 providers serving these populations to explore provider counseling and patient decision making.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: We suggest that counseling strategies should be adapted to: (1) provide greater detailed rationale for SIDS prevention recommendations; and (2) incorporate or acknowledge familial and cultural preferences. Ignoring the reasons for sleep decisions by African-American parents may perpetuate ongoing racial/ethnic disparities in SIDS.
Study Design: N/A
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: Georgia
Data Source: Mother interview
Sample Size: 80 mothers
Age Range: Parents of infants less than 6 months

Moon RY, Hauck FR, Colson ER. Safe infant sleep interventions: what is the evidence for successful behavior change? Curr Pediatr Rev. 2016;12(1):67-75. Access Abstract

NPM: 5: Safe Sleep
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Other Media, Sleep Environment Modification, Access, Group Education
Intervention Description: N/A
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: Countless interventions to improve the sleep safety of infants have been implemented. It is important to consider the different levels of barriers to and incentives for behavior change when developing interventions. Using a multi-level approach is ideal and may be more effective than targeting one specific level. Despite the multiple challenges and limitations of intervention evaluation, evaluation is still important, as it provides details of the intervention that are helpful for others considering similar interventions. Particularly as the success of an intervention may be context-dependent, it is important and helpful for those who implement interventions to conduct formal program evaluations that include both quantitative and qualitative components so that processes are transparent and that interventions are more easily translated to other communities. Further, if an intervention is found to be effective, there is more likelihood of sustainability. Therefore, formal process evaluation and testing of effectiveness are critical if interventions are to become independently sustainable. Continued funding, sustainability, and expansion for such projects are most possible if effectiveness data are available. Although the RCT is the gold standard for determining effectiveness of an intervention, it is currently not feasible in many instances. In those cases, the most rigorous evaluation design possible should be implemented. Agencies funding interventions should also include funding to evaluate the interventions to ensure that they are completed.
Study Design: N/A
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: N/A
Sample Size: N/A
Age Range: N/A

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.