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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Find Established Evidence


Displaying records 1 through 2 (2 total).

Campbell MK, Chance GW, Natale R, Dodman N, Halinda E, Turner L. Is perinatal care in southwestern Ontario regionalized? CMAJ. 1991;144(3):305-312.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1452689/

NPM: 3: Perinatal Regionalization
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): HOSPITAL, Continuing Education of Hospital Providers, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS, INTER-HOSPITAL SYSTEMS, Maternal/In-Utero Transport Systems, Follow-Up Given On Transferred Patients, STATE, Perinatal Committees/Councils, NICU Bed Registry/Electronic Bulletin Board

Intervention Results:

  • Among all women admitted to level I or II hospitals, the percentage of maternal transfer to level III hospitals increased from 2.2% of all admitted women (262 women) to 2.8% (p<0.003) after the intervention.
  • Among all women admitted to level I or II hospitals, maternal transfer of those with labor or threatened preterm labor before 37 weeks gestation to level III hospitals increased by 38% from 0.72% of all admitted women to 0.99% after intervention (p=0.024).
  • Among all infants born at 500-1499 gm, there was a statistically significant change in distribution of the number born in level III hospitals after intervention (p<0.001)

Lui K, Abdel-Latif ME, Allgood CL, et al. Improved outcomes of extremely premature outborn infants: effects of strategic changes in perinatal and retrieval services. J Pediatr. 2006; 2006 Nov; 118(5):2076-2083.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17079581

NPM: 3: Perinatal Regionalization
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Maternal/In-Utero Transport Systems, INTER-HOSPITAL SYSTEMS, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS, Consultation Systems, Perinatal Committees/Councils, NICU Bed Registry/Electronic Bulletin Board

Intervention Results:

  • Among all infants born at 23 to 28 weeks GA, there was a statistically significant decrease in the percentage of non-tertiary hospital births from 30.1% to 24.6% (p<0.001).
    • This decrease was mostly driven by a large decrease among births at 23 to 24 weeks GA from 50.8% to 37.6% (p<0.001).
    • The decrease among all births at 25 to 26 and 27 to 28 weeks was not statistically significant (p= 0.075 and p= 0.194, respectively)
   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.