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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 5 (5 total).

Dorrington MS, Herceg A, Douglas K, Tongs J, Bookallil M. Increasing Pap smear rates at an urban Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service through translational research and continuous quality improvement. Aust J Prim Health. 2015;21(4):417-22. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Patient Reminder/Invitation, Educational Material, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Reminder/Recall Systems, Quality Improvement/Practice-Wide Intervention, Designated Clinic/Extended Hours, Female Provider, Needs Assessment, PATIENT_CONSUMER, HOSPITAL
Intervention Description: Translational research (TR) and continuous quality improvement (CQI) processes used to identify and address barriers and facilitators to Pap smear screening within an urban Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS).
Primary Outcomes: Pap smears per year conducted by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service
Conclusion: he use of TR with CQI appears to be an effective and acceptable way to affect Pap smear screening. This model is transferrable to other settings and other health issues.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: An urban Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS)
Target Audience: All women within eligible age range
Data Source: Electronic medical records
Sample Size: Total (N=213)
Age Range: 18-70

Bastani R, Berman BA, Belin TR, et al. Increasing cervical cancer screening among underserved women in a large urban county health system: can it be done? What does it take? Med Care. 2002;40(10):891-907. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Education, Provider Audit/Practice Audit, Quality Improvement/Practice-Wide Intervention, Designated Clinic/Extended Hours
Intervention Description: Evaluation of a 5-year demonstration project testing a multicomponent (provider, system, and patient) intervention to increase cervical cancer screening among women who receive their health care through the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, the second largest County Health Department in the nation.
Primary Outcomes: Rate of registered Pap smears during the 9 months following the patient’s first clinic visit and entrance into the study
Conclusion: An intensive multicomponent intervention can increase cervical cancer screening in a large, urban, County health system serving a low-income minority population of under screened women.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (LACDHS) facilities: 2 large hospitals, 2 feeder Comprehensive Health Centers, and 6 of the health center’s feeder Public Health Centers
Target Audience: Women attending LACDHS facilities
Data Source: Medical records and computerized databases held by the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services
Sample Size: Total (N=18,642) Intervention (n=9,492); Control (n=9,150) Baseline (n=5,249) Year 2 (n=5,470) Year 3 (n=5,365) First 6 months of Year 4 (n=2,558)
Age Range: ≥18

Perkins RB, Zisblatt L, Legler A, Trucks E, Hanchate A, Sheinfeld Gorin S. Effectiveness of a provider-focused intervention to improve HPV vaccination rates in boys and girls. Vaccine, 2015;33(9):1223-1229. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Education, Quality Improvement/Practice-Wide Intervention, Provider Incentives (Maintenance of Certification)
Intervention Description: A provider-focused intervention that included repeated contacts, education, individualized feedback, and strong quality improvement incentives to raise HPV vaccination rates at two federally qualified community health centers.
Primary Outcomes: Rates of patient initiation of HPV vaccination at baseline and during 2 follow-up periods: “Active intervention period,” 6-12 months after the start of the intervention “Post-intervention,” the 6-month period after the intervention
Conclusion: Provider-focused interventions including repeated contacts, education, individualized feedback, and strong quality improvement incentives have the potential to produce sustained improvements in HPV vaccination rates.
Study Design: Cluster RCT
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: 1 outpatient pediatric/adolescent department at a major urban academic medical center and 7 affiliate federally qualified community health centers
Target Audience: Females who received primary care (>1 well visit) in the pediatric/adolescent department at a participating practice during the 2-year study period, excluding females who were pregnant during the study period and patients who received care in both an intervention and control practice5
Data Source: Electronic medical records
Sample Size: Total (n=3,961)6
Age Range: 11/21/2022

Kiser, L. H., & Butler, J. (2020). Improving Equitable Access to Cervical Cancer Screening and Management. The American journal of nursing, 120(11), 58–67. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.NAJ.0000721944.67166.17 Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT_CONSUMER, Educational Material, Patient Reminder/Invitation, HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Quality Improvement/Practice-Wide Intervention, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner
Intervention Description: Improving cervical cancer screening rates was identified as a priority in a federally qualified health center when only 40% of eligible women were properly screened in 2016. Forty-five percent of the population the clinic serves is uninsured and 60% are Hispanic. The aim of this quality improvement project was to have 75% of the women 21 to 65 years of age who sought care at this clinic during the 60-day project period receive Pap test eligibility screening, enrollment in a state and federal screening program, and case management. Four rapid plan–do–study–act cycles were used. Tests of change included team engagement, patient engagement, eligibility screening, and case log management. Data were analyzed using run charts to evaluate the impact of interventions on outcomes. The interventions consisted of team meetings, a patient engagement tool, an eligibility screening tool, and case log management.
Conclusion: A multicomponent approach led to underserved women receiving equitable access to cervical cancer screening and timely enrollment in a cervical cancer screening program.
Setting: Federally qualified health center (FQHC) in Tucson, Arizona,
Target Audience: Uninsured and underserved women ages 21-65

Fu, L., Smith, A., Ciotoli, C., Dannenbaum, M., & Jacobs, M. (2021). An immunization quality improvement learning collaborative in the college health setting. Journal of American college health : J of ACH, 1–10. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2021.1979560 Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): HEALTH_CARE_PROVIDER_PRACTICE, Provider Training/Education, Quality Improvement/Practice-Wide Intervention
Intervention Description: Teams participated in a 7-month virtual learning collaborative to implement immunization delivery best practices at their SHCs. A pre-post-intervention design was used to compare vaccination coverage in May 2017 to May 2018 among students who were unvaccinated at the start of the academic year.
Conclusion: Participating in a learning collaborative may help SHCs improve vaccination delivery.
Significant Findings: yes
Setting: Student health clinics

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.