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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Find Established Evidence


Displaying records 1 through 4 (4 total).

Nguyen BH, Nguyen K, McPhee SJ, Nguyen AT, Tran DQ, Jenkins CNH. Promoting cancer prevention activities among Vietnamese physicians in California. J Cancer Educ. 2000;15(2):82-5. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Reminder/Recall Systems, Provider Education
Intervention Description: A three‐year intervention targeting Vietnamese physicians in solo practice in California.
Primary Outcomes: Yearly physician Pap test performance rates
Conclusion: The results demonstrate the efficacy of an intervention targeting Vietnamese primary care physicians in promoting smoking cessation counseling, Pap testing, and pelvic examinations, but not other cancer prevention activities.
Study Design: RCT
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Private practices with physicians who were members of the Vietnamese Physicians’ Associations in Northern and Southern CA
Target Audience: Physicians in solo practice who had received their medical training in Vietnam
Data Source: Physicians’ medical records
Sample Size: Total (N=48) Analysis (n=20) Intervention (n=9); Control (n=11) N=physicians
Age Range: N/A

Dorrington MS, Herceg A, Douglas K, Tongs J, Bookallil M. Increasing Pap smear rates at an urban Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service through translational research and continuous quality improvement. Aust J Prim Health. 2015;21(4):417-22. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Patient Reminder/Invitation, Educational Material, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Reminder/Recall Systems, Quality Improvement/Practice-Wide Intervention, Designated Clinic/Extended Hours, Female Provider, Needs Assessment, PATIENT_CONSUMER, HOSPITAL
Intervention Description: Translational research (TR) and continuous quality improvement (CQI) processes used to identify and address barriers and facilitators to Pap smear screening within an urban Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS).
Primary Outcomes: Pap smears per year conducted by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service
Conclusion: he use of TR with CQI appears to be an effective and acceptable way to affect Pap smear screening. This model is transferrable to other settings and other health issues.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: An urban Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS)
Target Audience: All women within eligible age range
Data Source: Electronic medical records
Sample Size: Total (N=213)
Age Range: 18-70

Kaczorowski J, Hearps SJ, Lohfield L, et al. Effect of provider and patient reminders, deployment of nurse practitioners, and financial incentives on cervical and breast cancer screening rates. Can Fam Physician. 2013;59(6):e282-9. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Patient Reminder/Invitation, Educational Material, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Reminder/Recall Systems, Financial Incentives, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner
Intervention Description: Before-and-after comparisons of the time-appropriate delivery rates of cervical and breast cancer screening using the automated and NP-augmented strategies of the P-PROMPT reminder and recall system.
Primary Outcomes: Rate of Pap smear delivery, defined as the number of women in each practice that were up-to-date with screening divided by all eligible women
Conclusion: The use of provider and patient reminders and pay-for-performance incentives resulted in increases in the uptake of Pap tests and mammograms among eligible primary care patients over a 1-year period in family practices in Ontario.
Study Design: Total (N=246) Analysis (n=232) N=physicians
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Eight primary care network practices and 16 family health network practices in southwestern Ontario
Target Audience: Practicing physicians from the participating primary care network and family health network groups
Data Source: CytoBase (consortium of main laboratories in Ontario), combined with rosters of eligible patients
Age Range: N/A

Nguyen TT, McPhee SJ, Gildengorin G, et al. Papanicolaou testing among Vietnamese Americans: results of a multifaceted intervention. Am J Prev Med. 2006;31(1):1-9. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, Patient Navigation, Enabling Services, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Reminder/Recall Systems, Provider Education, Designated Clinic/Extended Hours, Female Provider, COMMUNITY, Television Media, Other Media, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: Development and implementation of a multifaceted intervention using community-based participatory research (CBPR) methodology and evaluated with a quasi-experimental controlled design with cross-sectional pre-intervention (2000) and post-intervention (2004) telephone surveys. Data were analyzed in 2005.
Primary Outcomes: Odds of ever having received a Pap test Odds of having received a Pap test in the past 12 months
Conclusion: A multifaceted community-based participatory research (CBPR) intervention was associated with increased Pap test receipt among Vietnamese-American women in one community.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Santa Clara County, CA and Harris County, TX
Target Audience: Vietnamese women living in either county
Data Source: Computer-assisted telephone interviewing system
Sample Size: Baseline(n=1,566) Intervention (n=798); Control (n=768) Follow-up (n=2,009) Intervention (n=1,004); Control (n=1,005)
Age Range: ≥18

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.