Skip Navigation

Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Find Established Evidence


Displaying records 1 through 7 (7 total).

Kabakama S, Gallagher KE, Howard N, et al. Social mobilisation, consent and acceptability: a review of human papillomavirus vaccination procedures in low and middle-income countries. BMC Public Health. 2016; 16(1):834. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Other Person-to-Person Education, Patient Navigation
Intervention Description: A qualitative study design included: (i) a systematic review, in which 1,301 abstracts from five databases were screened and 41 publications included; (ii) soliciting 124 unpublished documents from governments and partner institutions; and (iii) conducting 27 key informant interviews. Data were extracted and analysed thematically. Additionally, first-dose coverage rates were categorised as above 90 %, 90–70 %, and below 70 %, and cross-tabulated with mobilisation timing, message content, materials and methods of delivery, and consent procedures.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: Despite some challenges in obtaining parental consent and addressing rumours, experiences indicated effective social mobilisation and high HPV vaccine acceptability in LMICs. Social mobilisation, consent, and acceptability lessons were consistent across world regions and HPV vaccination projects/programmes. These can be used to guide HPV vaccination communication strategies without additional formative research.
Study Design: A qualitative study design
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Not specified
Data Source: A qualitative study design included: (i) a systematic review, in which 1,301 abstracts from five databases were screened and 41 publications included; (ii) soliciting 124 unpublished documents from governments and partner institutions; and (iii) conducting 27 key informant interviews.
Sample Size: 1452 studies/ abstracts reviewed/ interviews
Age Range: Not specified

Taylor VM, Hislop TG, Jackson JC, et al. A randomized controlled trial of interventions to promote cervical cancer screening among Chinese women in North America. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2002;94(9):670-7. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Patient Navigation, Enabling Services, Home Visits
Intervention Description: A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of two alternative cervical cancer screening interventions for Chinese women living in North America.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women who reported having received a Pap test in the 6 months between randomization and follow-up
Conclusion: Culturally and linguistically appropriate interventions may improve Pap testing levels among Chinese women in North America.
Study Design: RCT
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Seattle, WA and Vancouver, British Columbia
Target Audience: Women who spoke Cantonese, Mandarin, or English, with no history of cervical cancer or hysterectomy, who were defined as underutilizers of cervical cancer screening (no Pap test in the past 2 years and/or did not intend to have a Pap test in the next 2 years)
Data Source: Self-report through personal interviews and verified through medical record review
Sample Size: Total (N=402) Intervention Group 1 (n=129); Intervention Group 2 (n=139); Control (n=134)
Age Range: 20-69

Jandorf L, Bursac Z, Pulley L, Trevino M, Castillo A, Erwin DO. Breast and cervical cancer screening among Latinas attending culturally specific educational programs. Prog Community Health Partnership. 2008; 2(3):195- 204 Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Community-Based Group Education, Patient Navigation
Intervention Description: Assess the effectiveness of a culturally customized program (Esperanza y Vida [Hope and Life]) in increasing breast and cervical cancer screening among Latinas, and to examine how screening rates related to changes in cancer knowledge, differences in ethnic origins, and geographic location.
Primary Outcomes: Odds of Pap smear adherence at the 2-month follow-up
Conclusion: Esperanza y Vida has the potential to reduce health disparities in breast and cervical cancer morbidity and mortality rates through increasing cancer screening and thereby increasing early detection.
Study Design: Cluster RCT
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Arkansas and New York City, NY
Target Audience: Latina women
Data Source: Telephone survey
Sample Size: Baseline (n=487) Intervention (n=308); Control (n=179) Follow-up (n=238)
Age Range: Mean: 39.3

Taylor VM, Jackson JC, Yasui Y, et al. Evaluation of an outreach intervention to promote cervical cancer screening among Cambodian American women. Cancer Detect Prev. 2002;26(4):320-7. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Patient Navigation, Enabling Services, COMMUNITY, Community Events, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS, Home Visits
Intervention Description: A group-randomized controlled trial to evaluate a cervical cancer screening intervention program targeting Seattle’s Cambodian refugee community.
Primary Outcomes: Odds of having a self-reported Pap test in the past 12 months
Conclusion: This study was unable to document an increase in Pap testing use specifically in the neighborhood-based outreach intervention group; rather, we found an increase in both intervention and control groups. A general awareness of the project among women and their health care providers as well as other ongoing cervical cancer screening promotional efforts may all have contributed to increases in Pap testing rates.
Study Design: Cluster RCT
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Seattle, Washington
Target Audience: Cambodian women
Data Source: Self-report through personal interviews and verified through medical record review
Sample Size: Total (N=370) Analysis (n=289) Intervention (n=144); Control (n=145)
Age Range: ≥18

Nguyen TT, McPhee SJ, Gildengorin G, et al. Papanicolaou testing among Vietnamese Americans: results of a multifaceted intervention. Am J Prev Med. 2006;31(1):1-9. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, Patient Navigation, Enabling Services, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Reminder/Recall Systems, Provider Education, Designated Clinic/Extended Hours, Female Provider, COMMUNITY, Television Media, Other Media, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: Development and implementation of a multifaceted intervention using community-based participatory research (CBPR) methodology and evaluated with a quasi-experimental controlled design with cross-sectional pre-intervention (2000) and post-intervention (2004) telephone surveys. Data were analyzed in 2005.
Primary Outcomes: Odds of ever having received a Pap test Odds of having received a Pap test in the past 12 months
Conclusion: A multifaceted community-based participatory research (CBPR) intervention was associated with increased Pap test receipt among Vietnamese-American women in one community.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Santa Clara County, CA and Harris County, TX
Target Audience: Vietnamese women living in either county
Data Source: Computer-assisted telephone interviewing system
Sample Size: Baseline(n=1,566) Intervention (n=798); Control (n=768) Follow-up (n=2,009) Intervention (n=1,004); Control (n=1,005)
Age Range: ≥18

McKenney, K. M., Martinez, N. G., & Yee, L. M. (2018). Patient navigation across the spectrum of women’s health care in the United States. American journal of obstetrics and gynecology, 218(3), 280-286. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Patient Navigation
Intervention Description: Patient navigation is a patient-centered intervention that uses trained personnel to facilitate comprehensive and timely access to health services. Short-term assistance and health education are two facets of patient navigation; however, it seeks to sustainably eliminate health inequity by fostering the trust and skills patients need to stay engaged with care in the long term.
Conclusion: Because of the successes in cancer care at reducing disparities in health care access and health outcomes, patient navigation has the potential to improve care and reduce disparities in obstetric and benign gynecological care.

Han, H. R., Song, Y., Kim, M., Hedlin, H. K., Kim, K., Ben Lee, H., & Roter, D. (2017). Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Literacy Among Korean American Women: A Community Health Worker-Led Intervention. American journal of public health, 107(1), 159–165. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2016.303522 Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT_CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, Other Person-to-Person Education, Patient Navigation
Intervention Description: We conducted a cluster-randomized trial at 23 ethnic churches in the Baltimore, Maryland–Washington, DC, metropolitan area between 2010 and 2014. Trained CHWs enrolled 560 women. The intervention group received an individually tailored cancer-screening brochure followed by CHW-led health literacy training and monthly telephone counseling with navigation assistance. Study outcomes included receipt of an age-appropriate cancer screening test, health literacy, cancer knowledge, and perceptions about cancer screening at 6 months.
Conclusion: A health literacy–focused CHW intervention successfully promoted cancer-screening behaviors and related cognitive and attitudinal outcomes in Korean American women.
Significant Findings: yes
Setting: 23 ethnic churches in the Baltimore,MD-Washington, DC area
Target Audience: Korean American women who had not had a pap test in 24 months and who could read and write Korean or English

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.