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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 10 (10 total).

Taylor VM, Jackson JC, Yasui Y, et al. Evaluation of an outreach intervention to promote cervical cancer screening among Cambodian American women. Cancer Detect Prev. 2002;26(4):320-7. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Patient Navigation, Enabling Services, COMMUNITY, Community Events, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS, Home Visits
Intervention Description: A group-randomized controlled trial to evaluate a cervical cancer screening intervention program targeting Seattle’s Cambodian refugee community.
Primary Outcomes: Odds of having a self-reported Pap test in the past 12 months
Conclusion: This study was unable to document an increase in Pap testing use specifically in the neighborhood-based outreach intervention group; rather, we found an increase in both intervention and control groups. A general awareness of the project among women and their health care providers as well as other ongoing cervical cancer screening promotional efforts may all have contributed to increases in Pap testing rates.
Study Design: Cluster RCT
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Seattle, Washington
Target Audience: Cambodian women
Data Source: Self-report through personal interviews and verified through medical record review
Sample Size: Total (N=370) Analysis (n=289) Intervention (n=144); Control (n=145)
Age Range: ≥18

Thompson B, Coronado G, Chen L, Islas, I. Celebremos la salud! a community randomized trial of cancer prevention. Cancer Causes Control. 2006;17(5):733-46. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Other Person-to-Person Education, Enabling Services, Other Media, Community Events, COMMUNITY, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: In a randomized controlled trial of 20 communities, the study examined whether a comprehensive intervention influenced cancer screening behaviors and lifestyle practices in rural communities in Eastern Washington State. Cross-sectional surveys at baseline and post-intervention included interviews with a random sample of approximately 100 households per community. The interview included questions on ever use and recent use of Pap test, mammogram, and fecal occult blood test (FOBT) and sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy, fruit and vegetable consumption and smoking practices.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women who self-reported ever having received a Pap smear Percentage of women who self-reported receiving a Pap smear in the past 3 years
Conclusion: Our null findings might be attributable to the low dose of the intervention, a cohort effect, or contamination of the effect in non-intervention communities. Further research to identify effective strategies to improve cancer prevention lifestyle behaviors and screening practices are needed.
Study Design: Cluster RCT
Setting: Twenty communities in the Lower Yakima Valley of WA
Target Audience: Women
Data Source: Self-report through personal interviews
Sample Size: Total (N=1,962) Analysis (n=1,851) Intervention (n=894); Control (n=957)
Age Range: ≥18

Anderson JO, Mullins RM, Siahpush M, Spittal MJ, Wakefield M. Mass media campaign improves cervical screening across all socio-economic groups. Health Educ Res. 2009;24(5):867-75. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): COMMUNITY, Television Media, Other Media, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: This study sought to determine whether a mass media campaign conducted in Victoria, Australia, in 2005 was effective in encouraging women across all socio-economic status (SES) groups to screen.
Primary Outcomes: Number of registered Pap smears during 2005
Conclusion: Mass media campaigns can prompt increased rates of cervical screening among all women, not just those from more advantaged areas. Combining media with additional strategies targeted at low-SES women may help lessen the underlying differences in screening rates across SES.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Victoria
Target Audience: Women with no history of hysterectomy
Data Source: Victorian Cervical Cytology Registry
Sample Size: Approximate total (N≈1,421,390)4
Age Range: 18-69

Foley O, Birrer N, Rauh-Hain J, Clark R, DiTavi E, Carmen M. Effect of educational intervention on cervical cancer prevention and screening in Hispanic women. J Community Health. 2015;40(6):1178-84. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, Other Media, COMMUNITY, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: Evaluate the effect of an educational intervention on four domains of health care utilization and cervical cancer prevention and screening in a Hispanic population.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women with a self-reported Pap smear in the past 3 years
Conclusion: These tools should be promoted to reduce the cervical cancer burden on vulnerable populations.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Boston, MA
Target Audience: Hispanic women in the Boston area
Data Source: Written survey in English or Spanish
Sample Size: Baseline (n=318) Follow-up (n=295)
Age Range: ≥18

Howe A, Owen-Smith V, Richardson J. The impact of a television soap opera on the NHS Cervical Screening Programme in the North West of England. J Public Health Med. 2002;24(4):299-304. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): COMMUNITY, Television Media, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: Evaluate the impact of a Coronation Street story line, in which one of the characters died from cervical cancer, on the National Health Service (NHS) Cervical Screening Programme.
Primary Outcomes: Number of registered Pap smears performed on eligible women in the intervention Health Authorities during weeks 9-32 in 2000 and 2001
Conclusion: We have demonstrated a large impact of a soap opera story line on the cervical screening programme although the benefit to health is not clear. Further research will determine the long-term effect of the story.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Lancashire and Greater Manchester zones of the North West Region of the National Health Service
Target Audience: Women whose previous Pap smear was normal and who were on routine recall during the intervention period
Data Source: Health Authority cervical screening databases
Sample Size: Total (N=320,128)5 N= Pap smears
Age Range: ≥25

Morrell S, Perez DA, Hardy M, Cotter T, Bishop JF. Outcomes from a mass media campaign to promote cervical screening in NSW, Australia. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2010;64(9):777-83. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): COMMUNITY, Television Media, Other Media, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: The mass media has been shown to be effective at improving participation in cervical screening. A 2007 television advertising campaign to promote cervical screening in New South Wales (NSW) was examined.
Primary Outcomes: Weekly Pap test rates in 2006 and 2007 Number of screens performed during the campaign in 2007, compared to the corresponding period in 2006
Conclusion: Despite the ecological nature of this study, the mass media campaign appears to have been successful in increasing screening in unscreened and underscreened women in NSW.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest design
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: New South Wales
Target Audience: Women in New South Wales
Data Source: New South Wales Pap Test Register
Sample Size: Approximate total (N≈27,100) 2006 (n=12,284) 2007 (n=14,816) N=mean Pap smears per week
Age Range: 20-69

Blumenthal DS, Fort JG, Ahmed NU, et al. Impact of a two-city community cancer prevention intervention on African Americans. J Natl Med Assoc. 2005;97(11):1479-88. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): COMMUNITY, Other Media, Community Events, Television Media, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: The project explored the potential of historically black medical schools to deliver health information to their local communities and used a community-based participatory research approach.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women with a self-reported Pap smear in the past 2 years
Conclusion: This community intervention trial demonstrated modest success and are encouraging for future efforts of longer duration.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Nashville, TN; Atlanta, GA; Chattanooga, TN; and Decatur, GA
Target Audience: Women living in predominantly black census tracts in the intervention cities
Data Source: Telephone interview
Sample Size: Baseline(n=4,053) Intervention (n=1,954); Control (n=2,099) Follow-up (n=3,914) Intervention (n=1,959); Control (n=1,955)
Age Range: ≥18

Fernandez-Esquer ME, Espinoza P, Torres I, Ramirez AG, McAlister AL. A Su Salud: a quasi-experimental study among Mexican American women. Am J Health Behav. 2003;27(5):536-45. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Other Person-to-Person Education, Television Media, COMMUNITY, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Other Media, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: To test the effectiveness of a community intervention program to promote breast and cervical cancer screening.
Primary Outcomes: Rate of self-reported Pap smears in the past 2 years
Conclusion: Although it is important to address the cultural needs of all Mexican American women, it is also important to understand the tangible environmental barriers faced by the older women.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Predominantly Mexican American neighborhoods in San Antonio and Houston, TX
Target Audience: Mexican American women
Data Source: Self-report through personal interviews
Sample Size: Baseline (n=1,776) Intervention (n=882); Control (n=894) First Panel Follow-up (n=296) Intervention (n=153); Control (n=143) Second Panel Follow-up (n=145) Intervention (n=70); Control (n=75)
Age Range: ≥18

Moskowitz JM, Kazinets G, Wong JM, Tager IB. "Health is strength": a community health education program to improve breast and cervical cancer screening among Korean American Women in Alameda County, California. Cancer Detect Prev. 2007;31(2):173-83. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, Enabling Services, Other Media, COMMUNITY, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: A 48-month community intervention was conducted to improve breast and cervical cancer (BCC) screening among Korean American (KA) women in Alameda County (AL), California. KA women in Santa Clara (SC) County, California served as a comparison group.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women who self-reported receiving a Pap test in the past 3 years
Conclusion: Although our overall intervention did not appear to enhance screening practices at the community-level, attendance at a women's health workshop appears to have increased cervical cancer screening.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Alameda County and Santa Clara County, CA
Target Audience: Korean American women
Data Source: Telephone survey
Sample Size: Total (N=2,176) Baseline (n=1,093); Follow-up (n=1,083) Analysis (participated in baseline or follow-up) (n=1,902) Baseline (n=818) Intervention (n=404); Control (n=414) Follow-up (n=1,084) Intervention (n=418); Control (n=458)
Age Range: ≥18

Nguyen TT, McPhee SJ, Gildengorin G, et al. Papanicolaou testing among Vietnamese Americans: results of a multifaceted intervention. Am J Prev Med. 2006;31(1):1-9. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, Patient Navigation, Enabling Services, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Reminder/Recall Systems, Provider Education, Designated Clinic/Extended Hours, Female Provider, COMMUNITY, Television Media, Other Media, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: Development and implementation of a multifaceted intervention using community-based participatory research (CBPR) methodology and evaluated with a quasi-experimental controlled design with cross-sectional pre-intervention (2000) and post-intervention (2004) telephone surveys. Data were analyzed in 2005.
Primary Outcomes: Odds of ever having received a Pap test Odds of having received a Pap test in the past 12 months
Conclusion: A multifaceted community-based participatory research (CBPR) intervention was associated with increased Pap test receipt among Vietnamese-American women in one community.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Santa Clara County, CA and Harris County, TX
Target Audience: Vietnamese women living in either county
Data Source: Computer-assisted telephone interviewing system
Sample Size: Baseline(n=1,566) Intervention (n=798); Control (n=768) Follow-up (n=2,009) Intervention (n=1,004); Control (n=1,005)
Age Range: ≥18

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.