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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 13 (13 total).

Edwards A, Unigwe S, Elwyn G, Hood K. Personalised risk communication for informed decision making about entering screening programs. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2003;(1): CD001865. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Other Education
Intervention Description: Thirteen studies were included.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: Personalised risk communication (as currently implemented in the included studies) is associated with increased uptake of screening programmes, but this may not be interpretable as evidence of informed decision making by consumers.
Study Design: Systematic Review of 13 RCT
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Not specified
Data Source: Two reviewers independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Data about the nature and setting of the intervention, and the relevant outcome data were extracted, along with items relating to methodological quality.
Sample Size: 13 studies
Age Range: Not specified

Kabakama S, Gallagher KE, Howard N, et al. Social mobilisation, consent and acceptability: a review of human papillomavirus vaccination procedures in low and middle-income countries. BMC Public Health. 2016; 16(1):834. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Other Person-to-Person Education, Patient Navigation
Intervention Description: A qualitative study design included: (i) a systematic review, in which 1,301 abstracts from five databases were screened and 41 publications included; (ii) soliciting 124 unpublished documents from governments and partner institutions; and (iii) conducting 27 key informant interviews. Data were extracted and analysed thematically. Additionally, first-dose coverage rates were categorised as above 90 %, 90–70 %, and below 70 %, and cross-tabulated with mobilisation timing, message content, materials and methods of delivery, and consent procedures.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: Despite some challenges in obtaining parental consent and addressing rumours, experiences indicated effective social mobilisation and high HPV vaccine acceptability in LMICs. Social mobilisation, consent, and acceptability lessons were consistent across world regions and HPV vaccination projects/programmes. These can be used to guide HPV vaccination communication strategies without additional formative research.
Study Design: A qualitative study design
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Not specified
Data Source: A qualitative study design included: (i) a systematic review, in which 1,301 abstracts from five databases were screened and 41 publications included; (ii) soliciting 124 unpublished documents from governments and partner institutions; and (iii) conducting 27 key informant interviews.
Sample Size: 1452 studies/ abstracts reviewed/ interviews
Age Range: Not specified

McKeever AE, Bloch JR, Marrell M. Human papillomavirus vaccination uptake and completion as a preventive health measure among female adolescents. Nurs Outlook. 2015; 63(3):341-8. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Education on Disease/Condition, Other Person-to-Person Education
Intervention Description: The purpose of this study was to provide a review of the literature on HPV vaccination uptake and completion rates among female minority adolescents as well as a discussion of the financial and policy dimensions of HPV vaccination with implications that impact uptake and completion rates.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: The authors recommend that nurses and advanced practice nurses take an active role at the point of care to educate families about HPV vaccination. Nursing interventions for practice changes are provided to improve vaccination initiation and completion rates in disadvantaged populations.
Study Design: Literature Review
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Not specified
Data Source: Online database
Sample Size: N/A
Age Range: Not specified

Thompson B, Coronado G, Chen L, Islas, I. Celebremos la salud! a community randomized trial of cancer prevention. Cancer Causes Control. 2006;17(5):733-46. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Other Person-to-Person Education, Enabling Services, Other Media, Community Events, COMMUNITY, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: In a randomized controlled trial of 20 communities, the study examined whether a comprehensive intervention influenced cancer screening behaviors and lifestyle practices in rural communities in Eastern Washington State. Cross-sectional surveys at baseline and post-intervention included interviews with a random sample of approximately 100 households per community. The interview included questions on ever use and recent use of Pap test, mammogram, and fecal occult blood test (FOBT) and sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy, fruit and vegetable consumption and smoking practices.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women who self-reported ever having received a Pap smear Percentage of women who self-reported receiving a Pap smear in the past 3 years
Conclusion: Our null findings might be attributable to the low dose of the intervention, a cohort effect, or contamination of the effect in non-intervention communities. Further research to identify effective strategies to improve cancer prevention lifestyle behaviors and screening practices are needed.
Study Design: Cluster RCT
Setting: Twenty communities in the Lower Yakima Valley of WA
Target Audience: Women
Data Source: Self-report through personal interviews
Sample Size: Total (N=1,962) Analysis (n=1,851) Intervention (n=894); Control (n=957)
Age Range: ≥18

Foley O, Birrer N, Rauh-Hain J, Clark R, DiTavi E, Carmen M. Effect of educational intervention on cervical cancer prevention and screening in Hispanic women. J Community Health. 2015;40(6):1178-84. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, Other Media, COMMUNITY, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: Evaluate the effect of an educational intervention on four domains of health care utilization and cervical cancer prevention and screening in a Hispanic population.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women with a self-reported Pap smear in the past 3 years
Conclusion: These tools should be promoted to reduce the cervical cancer burden on vulnerable populations.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Boston, MA
Target Audience: Hispanic women in the Boston area
Data Source: Written survey in English or Spanish
Sample Size: Baseline (n=318) Follow-up (n=295)
Age Range: ≥18

Singh MK, Einstadter D, Lawrence R. A structured women's preventive health clinic for residents: a quality improvement project designed to meet training needs and improve cervical cancer screening rates. Qual Saf Health Care. 2010;19(5):e45. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Other Person-to-Person Education, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Education, Designated Clinic/Extended Hours
Intervention Description: Evaluate the impact of a quality improvement project of implementing a Women's Preventive Health Clinic (WPHC) on addressing gaps identified by needs assessments: residents' comfort and knowledge with female preventive care and cervical cancer screening.
Primary Outcomes: Rate of Pap test orders during two 2.5 year periods (pre-intervention and post-intervention)
Conclusion: The results indicate that a focused resident preventive programme can meet gaps identified by education and needs assessments, and simultaneously have a positive impact on cervical cancer screening rates and thus may serve as a model for other residency programmes.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland, OH
Target Audience: All women within eligible age range Second- and third-year internal medicine residents
Data Source: Electronic medical records
Sample Size: Total (=378) N=women Total (N=63) N=resident physicians
Age Range: 18-63

Fernandez-Esquer ME, Espinoza P, Torres I, Ramirez AG, McAlister AL. A Su Salud: a quasi-experimental study among Mexican American women. Am J Health Behav. 2003;27(5):536-45. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Other Person-to-Person Education, Television Media, COMMUNITY, PATIENT/CONSUMER, Other Media, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: To test the effectiveness of a community intervention program to promote breast and cervical cancer screening.
Primary Outcomes: Rate of self-reported Pap smears in the past 2 years
Conclusion: Although it is important to address the cultural needs of all Mexican American women, it is also important to understand the tangible environmental barriers faced by the older women.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Predominantly Mexican American neighborhoods in San Antonio and Houston, TX
Target Audience: Mexican American women
Data Source: Self-report through personal interviews
Sample Size: Baseline (n=1,776) Intervention (n=882); Control (n=894) First Panel Follow-up (n=296) Intervention (n=153); Control (n=143) Second Panel Follow-up (n=145) Intervention (n=70); Control (n=75)
Age Range: ≥18

Moskowitz JM, Kazinets G, Wong JM, Tager IB. "Health is strength": a community health education program to improve breast and cervical cancer screening among Korean American Women in Alameda County, California. Cancer Detect Prev. 2007;31(2):173-83. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, Enabling Services, Other Media, COMMUNITY, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: A 48-month community intervention was conducted to improve breast and cervical cancer (BCC) screening among Korean American (KA) women in Alameda County (AL), California. KA women in Santa Clara (SC) County, California served as a comparison group.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women who self-reported receiving a Pap test in the past 3 years
Conclusion: Although our overall intervention did not appear to enhance screening practices at the community-level, attendance at a women's health workshop appears to have increased cervical cancer screening.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Alameda County and Santa Clara County, CA
Target Audience: Korean American women
Data Source: Telephone survey
Sample Size: Total (N=2,176) Baseline (n=1,093); Follow-up (n=1,083) Analysis (participated in baseline or follow-up) (n=1,902) Baseline (n=818) Intervention (n=404); Control (n=414) Follow-up (n=1,084) Intervention (n=418); Control (n=458)
Age Range: ≥18

Nguyen TT, McPhee SJ, Gildengorin G, et al. Papanicolaou testing among Vietnamese Americans: results of a multifaceted intervention. Am J Prev Med. 2006;31(1):1-9. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, Patient Navigation, Enabling Services, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Reminder/Recall Systems, Provider Education, Designated Clinic/Extended Hours, Female Provider, COMMUNITY, Television Media, Other Media, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: Development and implementation of a multifaceted intervention using community-based participatory research (CBPR) methodology and evaluated with a quasi-experimental controlled design with cross-sectional pre-intervention (2000) and post-intervention (2004) telephone surveys. Data were analyzed in 2005.
Primary Outcomes: Odds of ever having received a Pap test Odds of having received a Pap test in the past 12 months
Conclusion: A multifaceted community-based participatory research (CBPR) intervention was associated with increased Pap test receipt among Vietnamese-American women in one community.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Santa Clara County, CA and Harris County, TX
Target Audience: Vietnamese women living in either county
Data Source: Computer-assisted telephone interviewing system
Sample Size: Baseline(n=1,566) Intervention (n=798); Control (n=768) Follow-up (n=2,009) Intervention (n=1,004); Control (n=1,005)
Age Range: ≥18

Patel DA, Zochowski M, Peterman S, Dempsey AF, Ernst S, Dalton VK. Human papillomavirus vaccine intent and uptake among female college students. J Am Coll Health. 2012;60(2):151-161. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Patient Reminder/Invitation, Educational Material, Other Person-to-Person Education
Intervention Description: To examine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine intent and the effect of an educational intervention on vaccine uptake among female college students.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women who received at least one dose of the HPV vaccine within 6 months of enrollment in the study. If dates of vaccination were unavailable, participants were mailed a brief questionnaire, telephoned, and e-mailed regarding their recent vaccination history.
Conclusion: Interventions to increase HPV vaccine uptake in college students should address HPV-related beliefs and broader barriers to vaccination.
Study Design: RCT
Significant Findings: No
Setting: University Health Service Gynecology Clinic at the University of Michigan
Target Audience: Full- or part-time female students visiting the clinic for a routine physical and had not received the first dose of the HPV vaccine series
Data Source: University of Michigan University Health Services medical records; self-report via a mailed survey, telephone interview, or email (if dates of vaccination were unavailable)
Sample Size: Total (n=256)4  Intervention (n=128)  Control (n=128)
Age Range: 18-26

The President’s Cancer Panel. Accelerating HPV Vaccine uptake: Urgency for Action to Prevent Cancer. A Report to the President of the United States from the President’s Cancer Panel. National Cancer Institute. https://deainfo.nci.nih.gov/advisory/pcp/annualReports/HPV/PDF/PCP_Annual_Report_2012-2013.pdf. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Access, Patient Reminder/Invitation, Other Education
Intervention Description: The President’s Cancer Panel. Accelerating HPV Vaccine uptake: Urgency for Action to Prevent Cancer. A Report to the President of the United States from the President’s Cancer Panel. National Cancer Institute. https://deainfo.nci.nih.gov/advisory/pcp/annualReports/HPV/PDF/PCP_Annual_Report_2012-2013.pdf.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: HPV infections cause nearly 26,000 cases of cancer in the U.S. and more than 600,000 cases worldwide each year. Two safe, effective vaccines can prevent infections with HPV types most commonly associated with cancer. In the United States, these vaccines have been recommended by ACIP for adolescent girls since 2006 and for adolescent boys since 2011.* However, HPV vaccine uptake lags behind that of other adolescent vaccines, leaving millions of young people vulnerable to infection with this cancer-causing virus. Increasing HPV vaccine uptake in the United States should be a public health priority. Successes in other countries and in parts of the United States indicate that this goal is achievable. Targeted interventions are needed to ensure timely progress. In this report, the Panel outlined a multipronged strategy for accelerating U.S. HPV vaccine uptake. All stakeholders in the National Cancer Program should work together and with stakeholders focused on vaccines to promote and facilitate HPV vaccination as an urgent national priority. Key to increasing HPV vaccination in the U.S. is reducing missed clinical opportunities. If all providers strongly recommend HPV vaccines to age-eligible patients, including those receiving other vaccines, uptake of HPV vaccines should increase dramatically. Systems changes should be made, as necessary, to support this recommendation. Also, parents and adolescents should be provided with information about HPV-associated diseases and vaccines so they can make informed decisions. In addition, they should be able to obtain vaccines at convenient locations and from a wider range of providers, including pharmacists. Although the Panel’s charge is focused on the U.S. National Cancer Program, the Panel recognizes the role of the United States in supporting cancer control efforts in other parts of the world, particularly lowand middle-income countries. Moreover, especially in the case of infectious diseases, what happens in one country may influence the health of another. HPV vaccines have the potential to reduce the significant burden of cervical cancer and other HPV-associated cancers in these countries. The United States should continue to collaborate with global partners and find ways to support development of HPV vaccine programs around the world. Continued research on HPV-associated cancers and HPV vaccines is needed to ensure that messages regarding vaccination are effective and that current vaccines are used optimally. Evidence that one or two doses are effective likely would result in major increases in HPV vaccine uptake. Next-generation vaccines that offer broader protection and/or logistical advantages should be pursued. Research is needed to determine how best to integrate HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening. The Panel is committed to achieving the vision of increased HPV vaccine uptake. In that spirit, the Panel suggests that a credible organization, such as NVAC, be given responsibility for monitoring the status of uptake and implementation of these recommendations. That accountability, in combination with the Panel’s commitment to monitor implementation of recommendations outlined in this report, will increase the likelihood that the report and its recommendations will become agents for change. The ultimate goal is reduction, or even elimination, of preventable HPV-associated cancers in the United States and around the world. This is a goal around which all major cancer and vaccine-related organizations should rally. It is achievable and within our reach.
Study Design: N/A
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: The United States
Data Source: N/A
Sample Size: N/A
Age Range: N/A

Han, H. R., Song, Y., Kim, M., Hedlin, H. K., Kim, K., Ben Lee, H., & Roter, D. (2017). Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Literacy Among Korean American Women: A Community Health Worker-Led Intervention. American journal of public health, 107(1), 159–165. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2016.303522 Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT_CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, Other Person-to-Person Education, Patient Navigation
Intervention Description: We conducted a cluster-randomized trial at 23 ethnic churches in the Baltimore, Maryland–Washington, DC, metropolitan area between 2010 and 2014. Trained CHWs enrolled 560 women. The intervention group received an individually tailored cancer-screening brochure followed by CHW-led health literacy training and monthly telephone counseling with navigation assistance. Study outcomes included receipt of an age-appropriate cancer screening test, health literacy, cancer knowledge, and perceptions about cancer screening at 6 months.
Conclusion: A health literacy–focused CHW intervention successfully promoted cancer-screening behaviors and related cognitive and attitudinal outcomes in Korean American women.
Significant Findings: yes
Setting: 23 ethnic churches in the Baltimore,MD-Washington, DC area
Target Audience: Korean American women who had not had a pap test in 24 months and who could read and write Korean or English

Ochoa, C. Y., Murphy, S. T., Frank, L. B., & Baezconde-Garbanati, L. A. (2020). Using a Culturally Tailored Narrative to Increase Cervical Cancer Detection Among Spanish-Speaking Mexican-American Women. Journal of cancer education : the official journal of the American Association for Cancer Education, 35(4), 736–742. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13187-019-01521-6 Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT_CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, COMMUNITY, Other Media
Intervention Description: The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of translating films, and whether the use of narrative is an effective vehicle for producing changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding cervical cancer compared with a nonnarrative film. A randomized controlled telephone trial surveyed the effectiveness of two films our team produced among a sample of 300 monolingual Spanish-speaking women, ages 25 to 45, who were of Mexican origin. Participants were recruited using random digit dialing (RDD) procedures from 2013 to 2014 in Los Angeles County and were randomly selected to view either a narrative or nonnarrative film. Data were collected by phone at baseline, 2 weeks, and 6 months after viewing. On average, participants arrived in the USA 25 years ago. The majority reported having less than high school education and limited English proficiency.
Conclusion: Narratives are a useful and underutilized tool to communicate information about cancer prevention. These findings have important implications for the delivery of health education among Spanish-speaking, low-literacy immigrant women, and for the reduction of cancer-related disparities.
Significant Findings: no
Setting: Los Angeles county, CA
Target Audience: monolingual Spanish-speaking women, ages 25 to 45, who were of Mexican origin.

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.