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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Find Established Evidence


Displaying records 1 through 6 (6 total).

Paskett ED, McLaughlin JM, Lehman AM, Katz MI, Tatum CM, Oliveri JM. Evaluating the efficacy of lay health advisors for increasing risk-appropriate Pap test screening: a randomized controlled trial among Ohio Appalachian women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011;20(5):835-43. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Patient Reminder/Invitation, Home Visits
Intervention Description: Evaluate the efficacy of a lay health advisor (LHA) intervention for improving Pap testing rates, to reduce cervical cancer, among women in need of screening.
Primary Outcomes: Odds of having received a Pap test at study completion
Conclusion: LHA interventions show promise for improving screening behaviors among non-adherent women from underserved populations.
Study Design: RCT
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Fourteen Ohio Appalachian clinics
Target Audience: Women living in Ohio Appalachia, who were not pregnant, and who were in need of a Pap test based on riskappropriate guidelines
Data Source: Medical record review and self-report
Sample Size: Total (N=286) Analysis Medical Record Review (n=270) Intervention (n=139); Control (n=131) Self-Report (n=233) Intervention (n=115); Control (n=118)
Age Range: ≥18

Taylor VM, Hislop TG, Jackson JC, et al. A randomized controlled trial of interventions to promote cervical cancer screening among Chinese women in North America. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2002;94(9):670-7. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Patient Navigation, Enabling Services, Home Visits
Intervention Description: A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of two alternative cervical cancer screening interventions for Chinese women living in North America.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women who reported having received a Pap test in the 6 months between randomization and follow-up
Conclusion: Culturally and linguistically appropriate interventions may improve Pap testing levels among Chinese women in North America.
Study Design: RCT
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Seattle, WA and Vancouver, British Columbia
Target Audience: Women who spoke Cantonese, Mandarin, or English, with no history of cervical cancer or hysterectomy, who were defined as underutilizers of cervical cancer screening (no Pap test in the past 2 years and/or did not intend to have a Pap test in the next 2 years)
Data Source: Self-report through personal interviews and verified through medical record review
Sample Size: Total (N=402) Intervention Group 1 (n=129); Intervention Group 2 (n=139); Control (n=134)
Age Range: 20-69

Taylor VM, Jackson JC, Yasui Y, et al. Evaluation of a cervical cancer control intervention using lay health workers for V50ietnamese American women. Am J Public Health. 2010;100(10):1924-9. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Home Visits
Intervention Description: Evaluate the effectiveness of a cervical cancer control intervention for Vietnamese American women that used lay health workers.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women who had received a Pap test within 6 months of randomization
Conclusion: Lay health worker–based interventions for Vietnamese American women are feasible to implement and can increase levels of Pap testing use among ever-screened women but not among never-screened women.
Study Design: RCT
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Seattle, Washington
Target Audience: Vietnamese women who spoke Vietnamese or English, and who had not received a Pap test in the past 3 years
Data Source: Self-report through personal interviews and verified through medical record review
Sample Size: Total (N=234) Intervention (n=118); Control (n=116)
Age Range: 20-89

Taylor VM, Jackson JC, Yasui Y, et al. Evaluation of an outreach intervention to promote cervical cancer screening among Cambodian American women. Cancer Detect Prev. 2002;26(4):320-7. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Patient Navigation, Enabling Services, COMMUNITY, Community Events, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS, Home Visits
Intervention Description: A group-randomized controlled trial to evaluate a cervical cancer screening intervention program targeting Seattle’s Cambodian refugee community.
Primary Outcomes: Odds of having a self-reported Pap test in the past 12 months
Conclusion: This study was unable to document an increase in Pap testing use specifically in the neighborhood-based outreach intervention group; rather, we found an increase in both intervention and control groups. A general awareness of the project among women and their health care providers as well as other ongoing cervical cancer screening promotional efforts may all have contributed to increases in Pap testing rates.
Study Design: Cluster RCT
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Seattle, Washington
Target Audience: Cambodian women
Data Source: Self-report through personal interviews and verified through medical record review
Sample Size: Total (N=370) Analysis (n=289) Intervention (n=144); Control (n=145)
Age Range: ≥18

Yucel U, Ceber E, Ozenturk G. Efficacy of a training course given by midwives concerning cervical cancer risk factors and prevention. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2009;10(3):437-42. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Home Visits
Intervention Description: This experimental field study was performed with the aim of evaluating the efficacy of training given to women about cervical cancer risk factors and primary and secondary prevention precautions.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women who self-reported receiving a Pap smear at the 12-month follow-up
Conclusion: Women were in need of knowledge about risk factors related to cervical cancer, prevention from and early diagnosis of cervical cancer, but there was no significant increase in the rate of having a Pap smear test despite the increase in the knowledge level with the training given.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Evka 4 Health Care Center in Izmir
Target Audience: Women who were literate, married, had social security, and were registered at the Evka 4 Health Care Center
Data Source: Written questionnaire
Sample Size: Baseline (n=254) Follow-up (n=227)
Age Range: 25-29

Community Preventive Services Task Force. The Community Guide to Preventive Services. What Works: Increasing Appropriate Vaccination. 2016. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.thecommunityguide.org/content/task-force-findings-increasing-vaccination. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Home Visits, Feedback, Educational Material, Incentives
Intervention Description: Home Visits to Increase Vaccination Rates, Reducing Client Out-of-Pocket Costs, Vaccination Programs in Schools and Organized Child Care Centers, Vaccination Programs in WIC Settings, Client-Held Paper Immunization Records, Client or Family Incentive Rewards, Client Reminder and Recall Systems, Clinic-Based Education when Used Alone, Community-Based Interventions Implemented in Combination, Community-Wide Education when Used Alone, Monetary Sanction Policies, Vaccination Requirements for Child Care, School and College Attendance, Health Care System-Based Interventions Implemented in Combination, Immunization Information Systems, Provider Assessment and Feedback, Provider Education when Used Alone, Provider Reminders, Standing Orders
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: N/A
Study Design: N/A
Significant Findings: N/A
Setting: N/A
Data Source: CPSTF
Sample Size: 18 studies
Age Range: N/A

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.