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Displaying records 1 through 20 (28 total).

Everett T, Bryant A, Griffin MF, Martin-Hirsch PP, Forbes CA, Jepson RG. Interventions targeted at women to encourage the uptake of cervical screening. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011;(5): CD002834 Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Educational Material, Counseling (Parent/Family)
Intervention Description: Thirty-eight trials met our inclusion criteria. These trials assessed the effectiveness of invitational and educational interventions, counselling, risk factor assessment and procedural interventions. Heterogeneity between trials limited statistical pooling of data.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: There is evidence to support the use of invitation letters to increase the uptake of cervical screening. There is limited evidence to support educational interventions but it is unclear what format is most effective. The majority of the studies are from developed countries and so the relevance to developing countries is unclear.
Study Design: Systematic Review of 38 RCT
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Not specified
Data Source: searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 1, 2009. MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS databases up to March 2009.
Sample Size: 38 studies
Age Range: Not specified

Katz IT, Ware NC, Gray G, Haberer JE, Mellins CA, Bangsberg DR. Scaling up human papillomavirus vaccination: A conceptual framework of vaccine adherence. Sexual Health. 2010; 7(3):279-86. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Educational Material, Access
Intervention Description: This review article provides a conceptual framework for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptance and adherence, with a focus on improving understanding of the sociocultural factors impacting vaccine adherence behaviour. We include a systematic review of the slowly expanding literature on HPV vaccine acceptability and uptake in developed nations, as well as the relatively few publications from poorer nations, where more than 80% of global cervical cancer related deaths occur and where the vaccine will probably have the largest impact.
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: "By developing a conceptual framework for HPV vaccine adherence, we hope to inform future research on vaccine adherence among adolescents at high risk for STI acquisition. The analytic construct proposed here recognises forces such as structural and sociocultural factors effecting vaccine uptake and incorporates them into the model. This model also takes into account the target population and the role that caregiver involvement will play in acceptance of this vaccination. It is provides a future direction for research. We caution readers that most reviewed studies, when considered on their own, yield evidence of inadequate quality to direct future interventions. We do believe, however, that this work, taken in combination with other health behaviour theories and a body of empirical literature that continues to expand on HPV vaccine uptake and adherence, suggests that programs promoting vaccine uptake and adherence would benefit from optimising educational messaging (vaccine effectiveness) while addressing important sociocultural barriers for both adolescents and their caregivers. Ultimately, we believe our proposed conceptual model will aid in future research aimed at understanding barriers to vaccine uptake and adherence, and ultimately provide further information about means to overcome them, thus enabling millions to receive the benefits of vaccination."
Study Design: Systematic Review
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Not specified
Data Source: "For our literature review, the lead author searched PubMed/MEDLINE and other electronic databases from 1995 to 2009 (the approximate time frame during which HPV was known to cause cervical cancer), as well as electronic conference proceedings of the recent HPV-related conferences, for articles related to HPV vaccine uptake and adherence. The focus was on likely barriers and facilitators, identified from behavioural theory, among adolescents and their caregivers. Since federal approval of the vaccine was not granted until 2007, we were only able to examine actual uptake in the latter years of our search. Search terms included: human papillomavirus (and variants such as HPV); AND adherence* and attitude* and uptake* and barrier* and knowledge* and risk perception*; AND vaccine*. We also searched the reference sections of included articles."
Sample Size: 400 studies
Age Range: Not specified

Oliver K, Frawley A, Garland E. HPV vaccination: Population approaches for improving rates. Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2016;12(6):1589-1593. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Feedback, Educational Material, Patient Reminder/Invitation
Intervention Description: "We used a PubMed search to identify studies that assessed interventions that looked at provider assessment and feedback, provider reminders, client reminder and recall, and clinic based education programs."
Primary Outcomes: N/A
Conclusion: There is evidence to support the application of the Community Preventive Services Task Force recommendations specifically to HPV vaccination both for client reminder and recall programs and for provider assessment and feedback interventions. Multiple targeted approaches will be needed to substantially impact HPV vaccine rates.
Study Design: Systematic Review
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Not specified
Data Source: PubMed Database
Sample Size: 13 studies
Age Range: Not specified

Byrd TL, Wilson KM, Smith JL, et al. AMIGAS: a multicity, multicomponent cervical cancer prevention trial among Mexican American women. Cancer. 2013;119(7):1365-72. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education
Intervention Description: Six hundred thirteen women of Mexican origin in 3 treatment sites were randomized among 4 study arms: the full AMIGAS program with a video and a flip chart (n = 151), the AMIGAS program without the video (n = 154), the AMIGAS program without the flip chart (n = 155), and a usual care control group (n = 153). Six months after enrollment, women were surveyed and reported whether or not they had been screened.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women with a self-reported Pap smear at the 6-month follow-up
Conclusion: AMIGAS was effective in increasing Pap test screening among women of Mexican descent when used in a 1-to-1 setting. Future research should compare the 1-on-1 intervention with the group-based intervention.
Study Design: RCT: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: El Paso, TX; Houston, TX; and Yakima Valley, WA
Target Audience: Mexican women with no Pap smear reported in the past 3 years
Data Source: Self-report and validated through medical records review
Sample Size: Intent-to-Treat Analysis (n=613) Intervention Group 1 (n=151); Intervention Group 2 (n=154); Intervention Group 3 (n=155); Control (n=153) Per-Protocol Analysis (n=513) Intervention Group 1 (n=128); Intervention Group 2 (n=125); Intervention Group 3 (n=127); Control (n=133)
Age Range: ≥21

Nguyen BH, Nguyen K, McPhee SJ, Nguyen AT, Tran DQ, Jenkins CNH. Promoting cancer prevention activities among Vietnamese physicians in California. J Cancer Educ. 2000;15(2):82-5. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Reminder/Recall Systems, Provider Education
Intervention Description: A three‐year intervention targeting Vietnamese physicians in solo practice in California.
Primary Outcomes: Yearly physician Pap test performance rates
Conclusion: The results demonstrate the efficacy of an intervention targeting Vietnamese primary care physicians in promoting smoking cessation counseling, Pap testing, and pelvic examinations, but not other cancer prevention activities.
Study Design: RCT
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Private practices with physicians who were members of the Vietnamese Physicians’ Associations in Northern and Southern CA
Target Audience: Physicians in solo practice who had received their medical training in Vietnam
Data Source: Physicians’ medical records
Sample Size: Total (N=48) Analysis (n=20) Intervention (n=9); Control (n=11) N=physicians
Age Range: N/A

O’Brien MJ, Halbert CH, Bixby R, Pimentel S, Shea JA. Community health worker intervention to decrease cervical cancer disparities in Hispanic women. J Gen Intern Med. 2010;25(11):1186-92. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education
Intervention Description: The current study is a randomized trial of a promotora-led educational intervention focused on cervical cancer in a local Hispanic community.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women who self-reported receiving a Pap smear in the past year, at the 6-month follow-up
Conclusion: The observed association between cervical cancer knowledge and Pap smear receipt underscores the importance of educating vulnerable populations about the diseases that disproportionately affect them.
Study Design: RCT: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: South Philadelphia, PA
Target Audience: Hispanic women
Data Source: In-person interview administered in Spanish by the promotoras
Sample Size: Total (N=120) Intervention (n=60); Wait-List Control (n=60) Analysis (n=70) Intervention (n=34); Wait-List Control (n=36)
Age Range: 18-65

Taylor VM, Hislop TG, Jackson JC, et al. A randomized controlled trial of interventions to promote cervical cancer screening among Chinese women in North America. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2002;94(9):670-7. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Patient Navigation, Enabling Services, Home Visits
Intervention Description: A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of two alternative cervical cancer screening interventions for Chinese women living in North America.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women who reported having received a Pap test in the 6 months between randomization and follow-up
Conclusion: Culturally and linguistically appropriate interventions may improve Pap testing levels among Chinese women in North America.
Study Design: RCT
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Seattle, WA and Vancouver, British Columbia
Target Audience: Women who spoke Cantonese, Mandarin, or English, with no history of cervical cancer or hysterectomy, who were defined as underutilizers of cervical cancer screening (no Pap test in the past 2 years and/or did not intend to have a Pap test in the next 2 years)
Data Source: Self-report through personal interviews and verified through medical record review
Sample Size: Total (N=402) Intervention Group 1 (n=129); Intervention Group 2 (n=139); Control (n=134)
Age Range: 20-69

Taylor VM, Jackson JC, Yasui Y, et al. Evaluation of a cervical cancer control intervention using lay health workers for V50ietnamese American women. Am J Public Health. 2010;100(10):1924-9. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Home Visits
Intervention Description: Evaluate the effectiveness of a cervical cancer control intervention for Vietnamese American women that used lay health workers.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women who had received a Pap test within 6 months of randomization
Conclusion: Lay health worker–based interventions for Vietnamese American women are feasible to implement and can increase levels of Pap testing use among ever-screened women but not among never-screened women.
Study Design: RCT
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Seattle, Washington
Target Audience: Vietnamese women who spoke Vietnamese or English, and who had not received a Pap test in the past 3 years
Data Source: Self-report through personal interviews and verified through medical record review
Sample Size: Total (N=234) Intervention (n=118); Control (n=116)
Age Range: 20-89

Decker KM, Turner D, Demers AA, Martens PJ, Lambert P, Chateau D. Evaluating the effectiveness of cervical cancer screening invitation letters. J Womens Health. 2013;22(8):687-93. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Patient Reminder/Invitation, Educational Material, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Designated Clinic/Extended Hours
Intervention Description: Evaluate the effectiveness of an invitation letter on cervical screening participation among unscreened women 30 to 69 years of age.
Primary Outcomes: Odds of receiving a Pap smear in the 6 months following the intervention
Conclusion: Sending invitation letters increased cervical screening participation but because the overall effect was small, additional strategies that remove barriers to screening for unscreened women are also necessary.
Study Design: Cluster RCT
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Manitoba
Target Audience: Women who had no Pap smear reported since 2001 and had been registered in the screening registry for at least 5 years (as of June 2010), with no history of gynecological cancer or hysterectomy, and who were covered by provincial health care insurance
Data Source: Cervical cancer screening registry
Sample Size: Total (N=31,452) Intervention (n=17,068); Control (n=14,384)
Age Range: 30-69

Taylor VM, Jackson JC, Yasui Y, et al. Evaluation of an outreach intervention to promote cervical cancer screening among Cambodian American women. Cancer Detect Prev. 2002;26(4):320-7. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Patient Navigation, Enabling Services, COMMUNITY, Community Events, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS, Home Visits
Intervention Description: A group-randomized controlled trial to evaluate a cervical cancer screening intervention program targeting Seattle’s Cambodian refugee community.
Primary Outcomes: Odds of having a self-reported Pap test in the past 12 months
Conclusion: This study was unable to document an increase in Pap testing use specifically in the neighborhood-based outreach intervention group; rather, we found an increase in both intervention and control groups. A general awareness of the project among women and their health care providers as well as other ongoing cervical cancer screening promotional efforts may all have contributed to increases in Pap testing rates.
Study Design: Cluster RCT
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Seattle, Washington
Target Audience: Cambodian women
Data Source: Self-report through personal interviews and verified through medical record review
Sample Size: Total (N=370) Analysis (n=289) Intervention (n=144); Control (n=145)
Age Range: ≥18

Dorrington MS, Herceg A, Douglas K, Tongs J, Bookallil M. Increasing Pap smear rates at an urban Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service through translational research and continuous quality improvement. Aust J Prim Health. 2015;21(4):417-22. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Patient Reminder/Invitation, Educational Material, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Reminder/Recall Systems, Quality Improvement/Practice-Wide Intervention, Designated Clinic/Extended Hours, Female Provider, Needs Assessment, PATIENT_CONSUMER, HOSPITAL
Intervention Description: Translational research (TR) and continuous quality improvement (CQI) processes used to identify and address barriers and facilitators to Pap smear screening within an urban Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS).
Primary Outcomes: Pap smears per year conducted by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service
Conclusion: he use of TR with CQI appears to be an effective and acceptable way to affect Pap smear screening. This model is transferrable to other settings and other health issues.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: An urban Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS)
Target Audience: All women within eligible age range
Data Source: Electronic medical records
Sample Size: Total (N=213)
Age Range: 18-70

Foley O, Birrer N, Rauh-Hain J, Clark R, DiTavi E, Carmen M. Effect of educational intervention on cervical cancer prevention and screening in Hispanic women. J Community Health. 2015;40(6):1178-84. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, Other Media, COMMUNITY, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: Evaluate the effect of an educational intervention on four domains of health care utilization and cervical cancer prevention and screening in a Hispanic population.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women with a self-reported Pap smear in the past 3 years
Conclusion: These tools should be promoted to reduce the cervical cancer burden on vulnerable populations.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Boston, MA
Target Audience: Hispanic women in the Boston area
Data Source: Written survey in English or Spanish
Sample Size: Baseline (n=318) Follow-up (n=295)
Age Range: ≥18

Kaczorowski J, Hearps SJ, Lohfield L, et al. Effect of provider and patient reminders, deployment of nurse practitioners, and financial incentives on cervical and breast cancer screening rates. Can Fam Physician. 2013;59(6):e282-9. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Patient Reminder/Invitation, Educational Material, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Reminder/Recall Systems, Financial Incentives, Nurse/Nurse Practitioner
Intervention Description: Before-and-after comparisons of the time-appropriate delivery rates of cervical and breast cancer screening using the automated and NP-augmented strategies of the P-PROMPT reminder and recall system.
Primary Outcomes: Rate of Pap smear delivery, defined as the number of women in each practice that were up-to-date with screening divided by all eligible women
Conclusion: The use of provider and patient reminders and pay-for-performance incentives resulted in increases in the uptake of Pap tests and mammograms among eligible primary care patients over a 1-year period in family practices in Ontario.
Study Design: Total (N=246) Analysis (n=232) N=physicians
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Eight primary care network practices and 16 family health network practices in southwestern Ontario
Target Audience: Practicing physicians from the participating primary care network and family health network groups
Data Source: CytoBase (consortium of main laboratories in Ontario), combined with rosters of eligible patients
Age Range: N/A

Bastani R, Berman BA, Belin TR, et al. Increasing cervical cancer screening among underserved women in a large urban county health system: can it be done? What does it take? Med Care. 2002;40(10):891-907. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Education, Provider Audit/Practice Audit, Quality Improvement/Practice-Wide Intervention, Designated Clinic/Extended Hours
Intervention Description: Evaluation of a 5-year demonstration project testing a multicomponent (provider, system, and patient) intervention to increase cervical cancer screening among women who receive their health care through the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, the second largest County Health Department in the nation.
Primary Outcomes: Rate of registered Pap smears during the 9 months following the patient’s first clinic visit and entrance into the study
Conclusion: An intensive multicomponent intervention can increase cervical cancer screening in a large, urban, County health system serving a low-income minority population of under screened women.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (LACDHS) facilities: 2 large hospitals, 2 feeder Comprehensive Health Centers, and 6 of the health center’s feeder Public Health Centers
Target Audience: Women attending LACDHS facilities
Data Source: Medical records and computerized databases held by the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services
Sample Size: Total (N=18,642) Intervention (n=9,492); Control (n=9,150) Baseline (n=5,249) Year 2 (n=5,470) Year 3 (n=5,365) First 6 months of Year 4 (n=2,558)
Age Range: ≥18

Gotay CC, Banner RO, Matsunaga DS, et al. Impact of a culturally appropriate intervention on breast and cervical screening among native Hawaiian women. Prev Med. 2000;31(5):529-37. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Enabling Services, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, Designated Clinic/Extended Hours, PROVIDER/PRACTICE
Intervention Description: This paper summarizes impacts of a breast and cervical cancer screening intervention spearheaded by a Native Hawaiian community.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women who had received annual Pap smears at the 3-year follow-up
Conclusion: Positive changes in screening activities among women aware of the intervention support the importance of information diffusion by community consumers. Diffusion may occur beyond the boundaries of the community as defined.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Oahu, HI
Target Audience: Native Hawaiian women
Data Source: Telephone survey
Sample Size: Total (N=1,260) Analysis (n=678) Intervention (n=318); Control (n=360)
Age Range: ≥18

Luque JS, Tarasenko YN, Reyes-Garcia C, et al. Salud es Vida: a cervical cancer screening intervention for rural Latina immigrant women. [published online Jan 12, 2016]. J Canc Educ. 10.1007/s13187-015-0978-x Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, PATIENT/CONSUMER
Intervention Description: This study examined the feasibility and efficacy of Salud Es Vida – a promotora-led, Spanish-language educational group session on cervical cancer screening (Pap tests), self-efficacy (belief in ability to schedule and complete a Pap test), and knowledge among immigrant Hispanic/Latina women from farmworker backgrounds.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women with a self-reported Pap test at follow-up
Conclusion: The group intervention approach was associated with increased cervical cancer knowledge, but not uptake of Pap test. More intensive interventions using patient navigation approaches or promotoras who actively follow participants or conducting one-on-one rather than group sessions may be needed to achieve improved screening outcomes with this population.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group
Significant Findings: No
Setting: 4 rural counties in Southeast GA
Target Audience: Hispanic/Latino immigrant women ages 21-65 who had not had a Pap test in 2 years or more
Data Source: Written survey; cervical cancer screening questions were derived from the Health Information National Trends Survey
Sample Size: Baseline (n=176) Intervention (n=86); Control (n=90) Follow-up/Analysis (n=90) Intervention (n=38); Control (n=52)
Age Range: 21-65

Moskowitz JM, Kazinets G, Wong JM, Tager IB. "Health is strength": a community health education program to improve breast and cervical cancer screening among Korean American Women in Alameda County, California. Cancer Detect Prev. 2007;31(2):173-83. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, Enabling Services, Other Media, COMMUNITY, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: A 48-month community intervention was conducted to improve breast and cervical cancer (BCC) screening among Korean American (KA) women in Alameda County (AL), California. KA women in Santa Clara (SC) County, California served as a comparison group.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women who self-reported receiving a Pap test in the past 3 years
Conclusion: Although our overall intervention did not appear to enhance screening practices at the community-level, attendance at a women's health workshop appears to have increased cervical cancer screening.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Alameda County and Santa Clara County, CA
Target Audience: Korean American women
Data Source: Telephone survey
Sample Size: Total (N=2,176) Baseline (n=1,093); Follow-up (n=1,083) Analysis (participated in baseline or follow-up) (n=1,902) Baseline (n=818) Intervention (n=404); Control (n=414) Follow-up (n=1,084) Intervention (n=418); Control (n=458)
Age Range: ≥18

Nguyen TT, McPhee SJ, Gildengorin G, et al. Papanicolaou testing among Vietnamese Americans: results of a multifaceted intervention. Am J Prev Med. 2006;31(1):1-9. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education, Patient Navigation, Enabling Services, PROVIDER/PRACTICE, Provider Reminder/Recall Systems, Provider Education, Designated Clinic/Extended Hours, Female Provider, COMMUNITY, Television Media, Other Media, POPULATION-BASED SYSTEMS
Intervention Description: Development and implementation of a multifaceted intervention using community-based participatory research (CBPR) methodology and evaluated with a quasi-experimental controlled design with cross-sectional pre-intervention (2000) and post-intervention (2004) telephone surveys. Data were analyzed in 2005.
Primary Outcomes: Odds of ever having received a Pap test Odds of having received a Pap test in the past 12 months
Conclusion: A multifaceted community-based participatory research (CBPR) intervention was associated with increased Pap test receipt among Vietnamese-American women in one community.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group
Significant Findings: Yes
Setting: Santa Clara County, CA and Harris County, TX
Target Audience: Vietnamese women living in either county
Data Source: Computer-assisted telephone interviewing system
Sample Size: Baseline(n=1,566) Intervention (n=798); Control (n=768) Follow-up (n=2,009) Intervention (n=1,004); Control (n=1,005)
Age Range: ≥18

Wismer BA, Moskowitz JM, Min K, et al. Interim assessment of a community intervention to improve breast and cervical cancer screening among Korean American women. J Public Health Manag Pract. 2001;7(2):61-70. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material, Community-Based Group Education
Intervention Description: A community intervention program was launched in 1996 to improve breast and cervical cancer screening among Korean American women in Alameda County, California.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women who self-reported receiving a Pap test in the past 2 years
Conclusion: After 18 months, interim program assessment revealed that mammograms improved, but Pap smears, breast self-examinations, and clinical breast examinations did not change significantly. However, results were similar for the control county probably because the program was not implemented fully. Several strategies for improving program implementation are discussed including recommendations for researchers planning community intervention projects.
Study Design: QE: pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Alameda County and Santa Clara County, CA
Target Audience: Korean American women
Data Source: Telephone survey
Sample Size: Baseline (n=818) Intervention (n=404); Control (n=414)
Age Range: ≥18

Bennett AT, Patel DA, Carlos RC, Zochowski MK, Pennewell SM, Chi AM et al. Human papillomavirus vaccine uptake after a tailored, online educational intervention for female university students: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Women’s Health. 2015;24(11):950-957. Access Abstract

NPM: 1: Well-Woman Visit
Intervention Components (click on component to see a list of all articles that use that intervention): PATIENT/CONSUMER, Educational Material
Intervention Description: This study evaluated the effect of MeFirst, an individually tailored, online educational intervention, on HPV vaccine-related knowledge, vaccination intention, and uptake among previously unvaccinated female university students.
Primary Outcomes: Percentage of women who self-reported receiving at least one dose of the HPV vaccine 3 months following the intervention.
Conclusion: We found that an individually tailored, online educational tool had similar effects as a nontailored factsheet on HPV-related knowledge, intention to HPV undergo vaccination, and HPV vaccine uptake among previously unvaccinated female university students.
Study Design: RCT
Significant Findings: No
Setting: Online at a Midwestern university
Target Audience: Full- or part-time female students with no prior receipt of any doses of the HPV vaccine and who were invited via email to participate
Data Source: Online surveys distributed via email
Sample Size: Total Baseline (n=661)  Intervention (n=330)  Control (n=331) Total Follow-up (Analysis) (n=332)  Intervention (n=175)  Control (n=157)
Age Range: 18-26

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.