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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 21 through 40 (56 total).

Maschinot B, Cohen J. 2012. Supporting babies and families impacted by caregiver mental health problems, substance abuse, and trauma: A community action guide. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 87 pp.

Annotation: This community action guide describes the experiences of a woman and her infant daughter to point out resources that service providers, advocates, and health professionals can use to better understand and respond to the needs of families and children with problems related to mental health, substance abuse, and trauma. The guide also presents information, resources, and tips to foster unified communities that are responsive to families' needs. Topics include the importance of the birth-to-age-5 developmental stage, threats to resilience, levels of stress in young children and families, protective factors, a strategic framework for action, and moving forward. Brief descriptions of successful programs are included.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SMA-12-4726.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children, Community programs, Domestic violence, Families, Family support services, High risk groups, Infants, Mental health, Parent support services, Resilience, Resource materials, Stress, Substance abuse, Vulnerability, Young children

Ku L, Ferguson C. 2011. Medicaid works: A review of how public insurance protects the health and finances of children and other vulnerable populations. Washington, DC: First Focus, 25 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews the evidence related to the effectiveness of Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) in addressing the health and financial needs of vulnerable Americans, including children, parents with low incomes, pregnant women, older adults, and individuals with disabilities. The report, which summarizes existing research, discusses the populations that are benefitting from these public health programs and the various ways in which Medicaid and CHIP are serving the health needs of vulnerable populations. The report includes statistics on changes in Medicaid enrollment between 2007 and 2010; a comparison of the health status and conditions of children who are Medicaid/CHIP beneficiaries versus those with private health insurance coverage; and a comparison of health status and diagnosis for nonelderly adults (ages 18–64) who are Medicaid/CHIP beneficiaries versus those with private insurance.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Children's Health Insurance Program, Evidence, High risk groups, Medicaid, Oral health, Research reviews, Treatment effectiveness evaluation, Vulnerability

Wulczyn F, Ernsgt M, Fisher P. 2011. Who are the infants in out-of-home care?: An epidemiological and developmental snapshot. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall, 11 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief focuses on infants in the foster care system and their unique needs, developmental vulnerabilities, and strengths. The brief examines five key domains in which infants in the out-of-home population differ from older children, including (1) incidence of first-time out-of-home placements, (2) duration in care, (3) experiences in care, (4) characteristics, and (5) vulnerability for delayed development.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cognitive development, Emotional development, Families, Foster care, Foster children, High risk populations, Infant behavior, Infant development, Infant health, Infants, Intellectual development, Low income groups, Motor development, Racial factors, Vulnerability

Schor EL, Berenson J, Shih A, Collins SR, Schoen C, Riley P, Dermody C. 2011. Ensuring equity: A post-reform framework to achieve high performance health care for vulnerable populations. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 48 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the problems facing vulnerable populations and offers a framework for improving health care outcomes. Based on recommendations from from the Commonwealth Fund Commission on a High Performance Health System, the report describes three strategies aimed at eliminating the health care divide: )1) ensuring that health coverage provides adequate access and financial protection; (2) strengthening the care delivery systems serving vulnerable populations; and (3) coordinating care delivery with other community resources, including public health services. Exhibits 1-11 highlight health disparities among populations according to race, ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status, and other variables.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Barriers, Health status disparities, Health systems, High risk groups, Program improvement, Vulnerability, Vulnerability

Center for Law and Social Policy. 2011. Building comprehensive state systems for vulnerable babies: A resource for state leaders. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 4 pp.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help state leaders strategize about how to create or improve early childhood systems to meet the needs of vulnerable infants and young children, their families, and pregnant women. The brief helps leaders locate the elements of a comprehensive early childhood system that are already in place and build these elements into a system that meets the needs of young children and families. The brief identifies the essential components of such a system and action steps to design and implement it.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, High risk groups, Infants, Young children, Pregnant women, Service delivery systems, State programs, Systems development, Vulnerability

Wilson LB, Taba S. 2011. Brighten baby's world. Honolulu, HI: Same Small Boat Productions, 1 DVD (8 min., 30 sec.).

Annotation: This video for trainers, administrators, and educators in early childhood programs in Hawaii is designed to increase awareness and understanding of positive attachment and social connections in the context of postpartum depression.

Contact: Same Small Boat Productions, 1050 Bishop Street, Suite 436, Honolulu, HI 96813, Telephone: (808) 384-2902 E-mail: info@samesmallboat.com Contact E-mail: lbwilson@webfishpacific.com Web Site: http://samesmallboat.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Attachment behavior, DVDs, Early childhood educators, Emotional development, Hawaii, Health promotion, Infant health, Parenting, Postpartum depression, Psychosocial development, State programs, Training, Training, Vulnerability

Center for Law and Social Policy. 2010. Detailed summary of home visitation program in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 10 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a summary of the home visitation program that is part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which President Barak Obama signed on March 23, 2010. The act includes $1.5 billion in mandatory funding for high-quality, evidence-based, voluntary early childhood home visitation services. The report describes the purpose of the act, statutory authority, federal and state administration, needs assessment, requirements for grant application, eligible entities and families, technical assistance, prioritized service population, benchmarks, outcomes, requirements, criteria for evidence of effectiveness, priority funding, evaluation, research, reports to Congress, payment of grants, grants to tribes and to nonprofits, maintenance of effort, appropriations, reservation and availability of funds, and applications of other provisions of Title V.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Evaluation, Families, Federal programs, Funding, Grants, Health services, Home visiting, Infants, Legislation, Low income groups, Research, Vulnerability, Young children

Cawthorne A, Arons J. 2010. There's no place like home: Home visiting programs can support pregnant women and new parents. [Washington, DC]: Center for American Progress, 13 pp.

Annotation: This brief focuses on home visiting for parents of infants and young children. It reviews existing programs to illustrate successful elements and to point out areas that need improvement. The brief also examines the effects of poverty on mothers and young children, discusses why home visiting programs are a good investment, and looks at how policymakers and stakeholders can craft effective programs for vulnerable families.

Contact: Center for American Progress, 1333 H Street, N.W., 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 682-1611 Fax: (202) 682-1867 E-mail: progress@AmericanProgress.org Web Site: http://www.americanprogress.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Families, Family support programs, Family support services, Home visiting, Infants, Low income groups, Mothers, Poverty, Vulnerability, Young children

Woods TA, Smith S, Cooper JL. 2010. Promoting the social-emotional wellbeing of toddlers in early intervention programs: Promising strategies in four communities. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 19 pp.

Annotation: This brief, which is a companion to a report on a 50-state survey of the Part C Program coordinators, presents approaches to support the social-emotional well-being of infants and young children through the Part C Program. The part C program, which is part of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, provides early intervention services for infants and young children with disabilities and their families. The strategies discussed in the brief were identified through case studies in four communities throughout the United States. The brief examines exemplary policies and practices that highlight the potential of the Part C Program to play a major role in reducing the risk of long-term social-emotional difficulties of vulnerable children. The brief includes a review of the Part C Program and the case study methodology, discusses promising strategies, and provides a summary of key findings and recommendations.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Emotional instability, Families, Federal programs, Infant development, Infants, Infants with special health care needs, Mental health, Vulnerability, Young children

Long VG. 2010. CATCH Kids Pontotoc Expansion Project: [Final report]. Tupelo, MS: CATCH Kids, 22 pp.

Annotation: This final report describes a project developed and implemented to address the problem of accessibility and availability and quality medical and dental care for disadvantaged children in Pontotoc County, Mississippi from March 2005 through February 2010. Goals and objectives are described, along with outlines of methodology, evaluation, and results/outcomes. Additional information is provided on publications or products developed along with future plans and followup. Appendices include data on needs assessment results, area demographics, and a sample form and survey. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Children, Dental care, Final reports, Mississippi, Vulnerability

Child Welfare League of America. 2010. The nation's children 2010. Arlington, VA: Child Welfare League of America, 10 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides statistical information about children in the United States in 2010. In addition to general information, the fact sheet presents information about the most vulnerable children, child abuse and neglect, permanent families for children, kinship support, child poverty and income support, child care and Head Start, health, child and youth mental health, substance abuse and child welfare, vulnerable youth, juvenile justice and delinquency prevention, funding child welfare services, and the child welfare work force. Separate fact sheets are available for each state and the District of Columbia, as well.

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Juvenile justice, Statistics, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Child abuse, Child care, Child health, Child neglect, Child welfare services, Children, Families, Financing, Head Start, Juvenile delinquency, Low income groups, Mental health, Poverty, Prevention, Substance abuse, Substance abuse, Vulnerability

Bruner CH. (2009). Philanthropy, advocacy, vulnerable children, and federal policy: Three essays on a new era of opportunity. Des Moines, IA: NSCI Clearinghouse and The Child Family Policy Center, 71 pp.

Annotation: This working paper includes three essays on both the past and potential future roles for philanthropy and child advocacy in influencing federal policy. The first essay provides a historical perspective over administrations, indicating that the challenges today are as urgent as they were in 1990; the second argues that a major rethinking and reconstruction of service financing is required; and the third offers a prescription for action -- investing in advocacy.

Contact: National Center for Service Integration Clearinghouse , c/o Child and Family Policy Center, 218 Sixth Avenue, Suite 1021, Des Moines, IA 50309-4013, Telephone: (515) 280-9027 Fax: (515) 244-8997 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.cfpciowa.org

Keywords: Advocacy, Federal policy, High risk children, Philanthropy, Vulnerability

Staker M. 2009. Project EAGLE - Central Intake and Referral System: Final report. Kansas City, KS: University of Kansas Medical Center Research Institute, 91 pp.

Annotation: This final report provides information about Project EAGLE -- Central Intake and Referral System, which screens for multiple risks in families in Kansas City, Kansas, with infants and children from birth through age 5 to provide timely referrals to address their needs in an effort to ensure that children at greatest risk for poor health and academic outcome receive the early intervention services that will support future success. Contents include a description of the purpose of the project, goals and objectives, methodology, evaluation, results and outcomes, publications and products, dissemination and utilization of results, future plans and follow-up. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Developmental screening, Early intervention, Final reports, Health screening, High risk children, High risk infants, Infant health, Kansas, Referrals, School readiness, Vulnerability

Grantmakers for Children, Youth, and Families. [2008]. The rearview mirror and the road ahead: Child, youth, and family philanthropy and federal policy, 1992-2008. Silver Spring, MD: Grantmakers for Children, Youth, and Families, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report tracks some changes that have occurred within the areas of philanthropy and federal policy and among vulnerable populations since the 1992 publication of the Grantmakers for Children, Youth, and Families report, Vulnerable Children and Families: Philanthropic Perspectives on New Collaborations: A Memorandum to President-Elect Clinton and the New Administration. The current report also identifies new challenges and opportunities for philanthropy in 2009 and beyond. Topics include President Cllnton's and President Bush's domestic policies, persistence in poverty and growing gaps in income and wealth, brain development and early childhood, results measurement and outcome-based accountability,adolescdent-development and place-based initiatives, investing in communication and evidence-based advocacy, the road ahead, opportunities and challenges, and the range of approaches to policy and advocacy. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Grantmakers for Children, Youth and Families, 12138 Central Avenue, Suite 422, Mitchellville, MD 20721, Telephone: (301) 589-4293 Fax: (301) 589-4289 E-mail: info@gcyf.org Web Site: http://www.gcyf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Advocacy, Child development, Children, Early childhood development, Families, Income factors, Initiatives, Poverty, Public policy, Vulnerability

Grantmakers for Children, Youth, and Families. 2008. Funding for sustainable change: Linking research, practice, and policy. Silver Spring, MD: Grantmakers for Children, Youth, and Families, 43 pp.

Annotation: This program provides information about the Grantmakers for Children,Youth & Families (GCYF) conference, Funding for Sustainable Change: Linking Research, Practice & Policy, held on October 15-17, 2008, in Chicago, IL. The program lists conference planning committee members, provides information about GCYF, presents a conference schedule and conference highlights, describes conference sessions, presents speaker biographies, and lists board of directors members and exhibitors. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Grantmakers for Children, Youth and Families, 12138 Central Avenue, Suite 422, Mitchellville, MD 20721, Telephone: (301) 589-4293 Fax: (301) 589-4289 E-mail: info@gcyf.org Web Site: http://www.gcyf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: ' Adolescent development, Adolescent, Child development, Children, Communities, Conference proceedings, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Education, Families, Family support, Financing, Initiatives, Low income groups, Mental health, Programs, Public policy, Service delivery systems, Social services, Vulnerability

Harbison E, Parnes J, Macomber J. 2007. Vulnerable infants and toddlers in four service systems. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 10 pp. (Children in their early years; brief no. 1)

Annotation: This brief compiles available data on the characteristics of vulnerable young children in four service systems: Early Head Start (EHS); the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC); the child welfare (CW) system; and Part C Early Intervention Programs (Part C). The brief compiles data on several different dimensions: age, race and ethnicity, parental income, parental education, parental employment, receipt of public benefits, family structure, child's health, and home environment. Endnotes and references are included.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Child health, Educational attainment, Ethnic factors, Families, Income factors, Infants, Parents, Racial factors, Service delivery systems, Vulnerability, Young children

Board on Children Youth and Families, Committee on Adolescent Health Care Services and Models of Care for Treatment, Prevention, and Healthy Development. 2007. Challenges in adolescent health care: Workshop report. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 90 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an integrated overview of information presented at two workshops on adolescent health care. The first, held in November 2006, was designed to elicit the views of a diverse group of health professionals and young people, with the goal of revealing gaps in current mechanisms for delivering health care to adolescents,with a particular focus on vulnerable groups. The second was a research workshop held in January 2007, which focused on the available evidence on the organization and delivery of adolescent health care. Topics discussed include (1) overview of adolescent health issues, (2) needs of the most vulnerable adolescents, (3) making the system work, and (4) issues to address. The report includes two appendices: (1) community forum agenda and participants and (2) research workshop agenda and participants.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-11270-2.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Conferences, Health care delivery, Health care systems, Research, Vulnerability

CityMatCH. 2007. Building the best environments for families and children: XVII Annual CityMatCH Urban MCH Leadership Conference. CityLights 16(3):1-12,

Annotation: This issue of City Lights focuses on the seventeenth Annual CityMatCH Urban MCH Leadership Conference, Building the Best Environment for Families and Children, held in 2007 in Denver, Colorado. The issue provides information about the conference and describes conference sessions; it also includes articles on health impact assessment: tools for moving toward healthier policies, building the best environments for vulnerable families and children: the post-Katrina story; the 2006-2007 DaTA team graduation; and fostering creativity to reach innovative solutions. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Environmental influences, Families, Health, Infants, Public policy, Urban populations, Vulnerability

Knitzer J, Lefkowitz J. 2006. Pathways to early school success: Helping the most vulnerable infants, toddlers, and their families. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 37 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief focuses on the challenges of helping infants and toddlers whose earliest experiences, environments, and relationships expose them to high levels of stress. The brief describes 10 strategies that programs and communities can take to ensure that these infants and toddlers and their families are connected to sufficiently intensive supports to place them on a path to early school success.The brief, which includes an executive summary, is divided into the following main sections: (1) setting the context (definiing vulnerability; the rationale for paying special attention to vulnerable infants, toddlers, and families), (2) appropriate intervention goals, (3) 10 strategies to help infants, toddlers, and families at high risk for poor outcomes, and (4) moving forward (principles to guide policy, practice, and advocacy). The brief includes three appendices: (1) Vulnerable Infants, Toddlers, and Families Conference participant list, (2) contact information for resources, and (3) additional national resources.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Families, Family support services, High risk children, High risk infants, Infant development, Infant health, Intervention, Parent child relations, School readiness, Stress, Vulnerability

Knitzer J, Lefkowitz J. 2006. Helping the most vulnerable infants, toddlers, and their families. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 37 pp. (Pathways to early school success; issue brief no. 1)

Annotation: This issue brief focuses on the special challenges of helping infants and toddlers whose earliest experiences, environments, and relationships expose them to high and consistent levels of stress. The brief describes 10 strategies that programs and communities can implement to help ensure that these infants and toddlers are connected to supports that can place them on a path to early school success. Also discussed are the context of the problem, goals for intervention, and moving forward. The brief includes three appendices comprising a list of Vulnerable Infants, Families, and Toddlers Conference participants; contact information for resources, and additional national resources. Endnotes are included.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early intervention, Families, Family support services, High risk children, High risk infants, School readiness, Stress, Vulnerability, Young children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.