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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 21 through 40 (113 total).

National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2015. Adaptive leadership and public health. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1 video (5 min., 25 sec.).

Annotation: This video examines adaptive leadership as a practical framework for leading consequential change in the midst of significant market and sociopolitical transformation. Topics include how local health officials and their staff are exploring innovative partnerships with other agencies in health care and beyond and identifying new ways of operating within and influencing the economic and social conditions of the health system.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Community action, Health care reform, Health systems agencies, Leadership, Local health agencies, Organizational change, Policy development, Political systems, Public private partnerships, Social conditions, Socioeconomic factors, Systems development, Transitions

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2014. ASTHO profile of state public health. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 140 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about state public health agency activities, structure, and resources. First published in 2007, the report aims to define the scope of state public health services, identify variations in practice among state public health agencies, and contribute to the development of best practices in governmental public health. Topics include governance and structure, work force, activities, planning and quality improvement, health information management, and finance. Individual profiles of responding states; a slide deck with tables and figures from the full report; issue briefs; infographics, information for researchers (survey instrument, codebook, and related materials); and previous reports are also available.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Financing, Management, Program planning, Public health infrastructure, Quality improvement, State health agencies, Statistical data, Surveys, Trends, Work force

Astone N, Martin S, Breslav L. 2014. Innovations in NYC health and human services policy: Teen pregnancy prevention. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 9 pp.

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2014. Safe infant sleep. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides an overview of sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), the recommended safe sleep practices to reduce the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related infant deaths, and strategies for state and territorial health agencies to reduce the rates of SIDS and other sleep-related infant deaths. Topics include laws and regulations, Cribs for Kids, safe sleep campaigns, WIC messaging, and public health recommendations.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education, Environmental influences, Infant death, Infants, Injury prevention, Legislation, Policy development, Public awareness campaigns, Regulations, Risk factors, SIDS, Sleep, Sleep position, State health agencies

National Association of County and City Health Officials . 2014. Capacity of local health departments to track, administer, and promote seasonal influenza vaccination for pregnant women, children with special health care needs, and adults with disabilities. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials , 8 pp.

Annotation: This research brief highlights the extent to which local health departments (LHDs) provide and have the capacity to track, administer, and promote influenza (flu) vaccination for pregnant women, children with special health care needs, and adults with disabilities. Contents include data on the percentage of LHDs providing adult and child immunizations for the period 2005-2013 and findings from key informant interviews on seasonal flu vaccination rates, administering and promoting vaccinations, and partnerships. Reimbursement issues; the emergence of retail pharmacies in the immunization market; strategies used to promote flu vaccination; and opportunities, challenges, and recommendations are also discussed.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Adults, Children with special health care needs, Disabilities, Health agencies, Influenza, Local government, Pregnant women, Prevention services, Public health infrastructure, Vaccines

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of the Associate Director for Policy. 2014. Using evaluation to inform CDC's policy process. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 22 pp.

Annotation: This document for public health professionals provides information on using evaluation to inform the policy process. Topics include identifying where you are in the policy process and focusing on evaluation, using logic models to describe policy efforts, gathering credible evidence, justifying conclusions, ensuring use of findings and sharing lessons learned, and using evaluation to inform the specific domains of the policy process. Examples are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Evaluation methods, Federal agencies, Health policy, Models, Policy development, Process evaluation, Public health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of the Associate Director for Policy. 2014. Overview of CDC's policy process. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 7 pp.

Annotation: This document for public health professionals summarizes domains of the policy process. Topics include what policy is and the process by which it is conceptualized, developed, adopted, and evaluated. Topics include problem identification, policy analysis, strategy and policy development, policy enactment, policy implementation, stakeholder engagement and education, and evaluation.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal agencies, Health policy, Policy analysis, Policy development, Public health

National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2014. Maternal, child, and adolescent health (MCAH) champions: The local MCAH capacity building project experience. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 8 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a multi-year demonstration project to build local health department's (LHD's) technical knowledge and leadership abilities for maternal and child health through blended learning techniques including in-person capacity building trainings and virtual coaching, networking, and peer-to-peer sharing. Contents include information about the project framework and outcomes, participating LHDs, lessons learned, and recommendations for future capacity building projects is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: City health agencies, County health agencies, Leadership, Local MCH programs, MCH training, Networking, Organizational change, Peer education, Public health infrastructure, Technical assistance, Work force

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2014. Opportunities for collaboration: Public health departments and accountable care organizations. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 10 pp. (CDC public health policy series no. 1)

Annotation: This brief focuses on the interface of public health departments and accountable care organizations (ACOs) and highlights opportunities for enhanced collaboration between the two entities. The brief describes Medicare, Medicaid, and private ACOs, and other ACO-like models; how payment delivery is changing with the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and promising practices. Topics include public health as a convener, as a source of data analysis, and as a direct delivery partner.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Model programs, Public health agencies, Public private partnerships

Prentice B. 2014. Expanding the boundaries: Health equity and public health practice. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 64 pp.

Annotation: This book focuses on how the prospects for health and well-being are influenced by social inequalities. Contents include an overview of the early history of public health and how some of the greatest achievements prefigure a contemporary health equity practice; the root causes of health inequities including class, racism, and gender inequity and heterosexism; profiles of health equity practice; elements of health equity practice that have emerged from the work of state and local health departments across the United States; and reflections on a future health equity practice.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org $9.95 members; $19.95 nonmembers. Document Number: NA614.

Keywords: Civil rights, Equal opportunities, Gender discrimination, Public health agencies, Racial discrimination, Sexism, Social discrimination

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2014. Building a formal ethics infrastructure at local health departments. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines six recommendations for how local health departments should create infrastructure to address ethical issues that arise in public health practice. The appendices contain an in-depth summary of the process used to the develop the recommendations and examples of formal ethics infrastructures.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: City health agencies, County health agencies, Ethics, Local government, Policy development, Public health infrastructure

U.S. Food and Drug Administration. 2013. Ensuring access to adequate information on medical products for all: With special focus on underrepresented subpopulations, including racial subgroups. [Silver Spring, MD]: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 26 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an overview of how the Food and Drug Administration operates in terms of its communications and describes how the agency communicates the benefits and risks of medical products to health care providers and patients, especially underrepresented populations, including racial subgroups. Topics include communications with the general public, including MedWatch, social media, staff and advisory committees, and external stakeholder meetings; as well as designing communications for populations with limited English proficiency, health literacy, and outreach. Appendices include highlights of the risk communications strategic plan, and the Office of Minority Health web site on Federal Health Information.

Contact: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20993, Telephone: (888) 463-6332 Fax: (301) 443-3100 Web Site: http://www.fda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Cultural competency, Federal agencies, Health literacy, Limited English speakers, Public health, Racial factors, U.S. Food and Drug Administration

McElwain L, Tilley P, Warren MD. 2013. The true meaning of succession planning. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1 video (63 min., 39 sec.).

Annotation: This webinar, broadcast July 24, 2013, discusses identifying and grooming the next generation of leaders as an on-going part of maternal and child health program workforce development efforts designed to sustain an organization or agency’s capacity, including developing skills, knowledge, and building leadership capacity. Topics include successful succession planning strategies in the Tennessee Department of Health, the Wyoming Department of Health and the Maternal and Child Health Section, and New Hampshire’s Maternal and Child Health Program.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Leadership training, Public health agencies, Resources for professionals, Transition planning, Work force

National Association of County and City Health Officials . 2013. Staying resilient in hard times: Local collaboration for women, children, youth and families . Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials , 8 pp.

Annotation: This research brief presents findings from the Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health 2012 Survey, which was conducted as part of a larger research project to determine local health department best practices for implementing services and programs that meet the needs of pregnant women, infants, children, and adolescents in light of the economic downturn and a changing health care system landscape. The brief presents the landscape of existing and potential maternal, child, and adolescent health (MCAH) partners in local jurisdictions, with the goal of providing insight into the extent to which MCAH staff collaborate with partners and their interest in maintaining or expanding these collaborations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: City health agencies, Collaboration, County health agencies, Health care reform, MCH research, Model programs, National surveys, Public private partnerships

National Network of Libraries of Medicine. 2013. Bringing health information to the community (BHIC). [Bethesda, MD]: National Network of Libraries of Medicine,

Annotation: [This blog focuses on health information issues related to the community, especially underserved communities. Entries include information on providing health information services, health assessments, diseases and chronic conditions, monthly health awareness observances, new mobile applications (apps), health advice and tips, as well as federal health agencies' news.

Contact: National Network of Libraries of Medicine, 8600 Rockville Pike, Building 38, Room B1-E03, Bethesda, MD 20894, Telephone: (800)338-7657 Web Site: http://nnlm.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Health agencies, Health observances, Information services, Prevention services, Public awareness campaigns, Public health

Prevention Research Center in St. Louis. 2012-. LEAD-public health project (Local Evidence for Affecting Decisions about Public Health). St. Louis, WA: Washington University St. Louis, 1 v.

Annotation: This website describes a project to examine the use of, barriers to, and methods for enhancing evidence-based programs and policies (EBPP) in local health departments. Contents include the project goals, dates, and target audience; implications for research and practice; project staff, partners, and funders; and a list of related publications and presentations. A series of issue briefs on topics such as workforce development, leadership, organizational culture, relationships and partnerships, and financial practices are included. The website also contains the national survey instrument, an information brief, and the case study qualitative survey guide.

Contact: Prevention Research Center in St. Louis, Washington University in St. Louis, 621 N. Skinker Boulevard, Campus Box 1006, St. Louis, MO 63130, Telephone: (314) 935-0121 E-mail: prcstl@wustl.edu Web Site: http://prcstl.wustl.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Administration, Case studies, Evidence based medicine, Financing, Local government, Model programs, National surveys, Policy development, Public health agencies, Research, Work force

U.S. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families . 2012. Promoting social and emotional well-being for children and youth receiving child welfare services. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , 21 pp.

Annotation: This information memorandum for state, tribal, and territorial agencies administering or supervising the administration of Titles IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act, Indian Tribes and Indian Tribal Organizations, seeks to promote social and emotional well-bring for children and adolescents who have experienced maltreatment and are receiving child welfare services. The memorandum includes an overview of the issue and a discussion of the Administration on Children, Youth and Families' well-being framework, emerging evidence on the impact of maltreatment, requirements and policy opportunities, current state and county investments, screening and functional assessment, effective interventions, and maximizing resources to achieve better results.

Contact: U.S. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: Secondary Telephone: Fax: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/acyf Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent mental health, American Indians, Child development, Child maltreatment, Child mental health, Child welfare, Child welfare agencies, Intervention, Legislation, Public policy, Screening, Social service agencies, State agencies

Henderson M. 2012. Maintenance of certification: ABCD III state efforts to capitalize on an incentive for quality improvement. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief, which is the third in a series of Assuring Better Child Health and Development III (ABCD III) issue briefs, focuses on the lessons learned in ABCD III about state agency partnerships with physicians and community providers to develop quality-improvement projects with a built-in incentive for physicians. ABCD III is a 3-year learning collaborative from five states (Arkansas, Illinois, Minnesota, Oklahoma, and Oregon) designed to improve care coordination between primary care health professionals and other providers of community services for children up to age 3. These projects offering continuing education credit that physicians need to maintain their specialty board certification.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Collaboration, Communities, Continuing education, Infants, Managed care, Programs, Public policy, Quality assurance, Service coordination, State agencies, Young children

U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2012. Office of Adolescent Health strategic plan FY 2012–2015. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, 36 pp.

Annotation: This report describes activities the Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) undertook in 2012 to improve the health of U.S. adolescents. The report describes OAH's goals, objectives, strategies, and action steps; Goals include (1) lead national grant programs to prevent adolescent pregnancy and support pregnant and parenting adolescents and women; (2) expand evidence of what works to reduce health risk among adolescents and to effect positive adolescent development; (3) lead adolescent health policy, practice, and program development; (4) promote, communicate, and disseminate accurate information on the full range of issues related to adolescent health to multiple audiences; and (5) increase OAH's capacity to achieve optimal performance and document accomplishments.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Federal agencies, Parent support services, Pregnant women, Prevention, Programs, Public policy, Strategic plans

National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2012. Roadmap to a culture of quality improvement: A guide to leadership and success in local health departments. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance to local health departments (LHDs) on progressing through six phases or levels of quality improvement (QI) integration until a culture of QI has been reached and can be sustained. For each phase, the document presents common organizational characteristics and incremental strategies for transitioning to the next stage. The document also describes six foundational elements of a QI culture that LHDs should cultivate over time.

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org

Keywords: City health agencies, County health agencies, Evolution, Leadership, Learning, Local government, Organizational change, Outcome and process assessment, Program improvement, Public health infrastructure, Quality assurance, Sustainability, Systems development, Transitions

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.