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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 21 through 40 (47 total).

American Dietetic Association. 2002. Adolescent nutrition: A springboard for health. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 102(3, Supplement): S1-S111,

Annotation: This supplement to the March 2002 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association focuses on adolescent nutrition. Articles from varying authors include suggestions on the many approaches that have been successful in teaching adolescents about healthful eating and the importance of physical activity (e.g., interventions, Web sites, comprehensive nutrition screening, counseling sessions, school-based nutrition promotion programs). Topics include the physical, psychosocial, and environmental issues adolescents face as they mature into young adulthood; and how dietetic professionals can address these concerns while providing nutrition counseling. The supplement issue concludes with a section for professional interest on adolescent health organizations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, Telephone: (800) 877-1600 Secondary Telephone: (312) 899-0400 Contact Phone: (312) 899-4854 Contact Fax: (312) 899-4739 Contact E-mail: sdenny@eatright.org Web Site: http://www.eatright.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Dietary guidelines, Dietitians, Health promotion, Nutrition, Physical activity, Program descriptions, Psychosocial development, Research, Social factors, Weight management, Young adults

Stuber M. 2002. Health care utilization: Pediatric organ transplantation—Final report. Los Angeles, CA: University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Psychiatry, 20 pp.

Annotation: This final report describes an investigation into the relationship between psychosocial factors and health care utilization for pediatric solid organ transplant recipients at the University of California, Los Angeles, and their families, as an initial step towards developing interventions which might improve outcomes and be cost-efficient. Topics include transplant recipient mental health or presence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), parental depression or anxiety, and challenges to parents and families in caring for a chronically ill child. Report sections include the project background, review of the literature, study designs and methods, measures, statistical techniques, results, and discussion. Provided are a list of products and presentations generated by the project, along with references. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child mental health, Children with special health care needs, Depression, Final reports, Health care utilization, MCH research, Organ transplantation, Outcome evaluation, Parent support services, Posttraumatic stress disorder, Psychosocial factors

Beckles GLA, Thompson-Reid PE, eds. 2001. Diabetes and women's health across the life stages: A public health perspective. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 222 pp.

Annotation: This monograph examines the impact of diabetes through the life stages of women. Topics include a profile of women in the United States, population size and characteristics, psychosocial determinants of health behaviors and outcomes, and public health implications. The next chapters focus on prevalence, incidence, and trends; sociodemographic characteristics; the impact of diabetes on health status; health related behaviors; psychosocial determinants; concurrent illness as a determinant of health behaviors and outcomes; and public health implications for the adolescent years, the reproductive years, the middle years, and the older years. The monograph is geared toward public health professionals, policymakers, staff of community-based organizations and voluntary organizations, researchers, and advocates for women's health, as well as toward persons interested in issues related to women and diabetes. Statistical data on population characteristics, economic status, education, ethnic factors, and age factors are presented in chart and graph format throughout the monograph.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Diabetes, Health status, Population dynamics, Psychosocial factors, Public health services, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Women's health

Green M,Palfrey JS, eds. 2001. Bright Futures: Guidelines for health supervision of infants, children, and adolescents (2nd ed.) (Rev.). Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 338 pp.

Annotation: These Bright Futures guidelines provide health professionals and families with practical information, effective preventive techniques, and health promotion materials. They are designed to be adapted to meet regional priorities, take advantage of community resources, and help health professionals organize their practices to meet their patient needs. The guidelines begin with a brief description of the Bright Futures program and an introduction to health supervision. Individual chapters focus on infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence. Each chapter covers age-specific information about the preparation families can do before a health visit, strengths and issues of the age group, and developmental charts. Appendices include (1) the Bright Futures periodicity schedule, (2) medical history, (3) recommended immunization schedule, (4) hearing screening, (5) vision screening, (6) iron-deficiency anemia screening, (7) screening for elevated blood lead levels, (8) hyperlipidemia screening, (9) hypertension screening, (10) tooth eruption chart, (11) sexual maturity ratings, (12) sexually transmitted disease prevention and screening, (13) safe, quality child care, (14) a bibliography, and (15) a list of participants in the first edition of these guidelines. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan. Document Number: BF0902-001; ISBN 1-57285-070-1.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Bright Futures, Child health, Children, Community programs, Families, Guidelines, Health supervision, Infant health, Infants, Injury prevention, Patient care, Prevention services, Preventive health services, Psychosocial development, Regional factors

Green M, Palfrey JS, eds. 2000. Bright Futures: Guidelines for health supervision of infants, children, and adolescents (2nd ed.). Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 338 pp., 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: These Bright Futures guidelines provide health professionals and families with practical information, effective preventive techniques, and health promotion materials. They are designed to be adapted to meet regional priorities, take advantage of community resources, and help health professionals organize their practices to meet their patient needs. The guidelines begin with a brief description of the Bright Futures program and an introduction to health supervision. Individual chapters focus on infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence. Each chapter covers age-specific information about the preparation families can do before a health visit, strengths and issues of the age group, and developmental charts. Appendices include (1) the Bright Futures periodicity schedule, (2) medical history, (3) recommended immunization schedule, (4) hearing screening, (5) vision screening, (6) iron-deficiency anemia screening, (7) screening for elevated blood lead levels, (8) hyperlipidemia screening, (9) hypertension screening, (10) tooth eruption chart, (11) sexual maturity ratings, (12) sexually transmitted disease prevention and screening, (13) safe, quality child care, (14) a bibliography, and (15) a list of participants in the first edition of these guidelines. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan. Document Number: BF0902-001; ISBN 1-57285-058-2.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Bright Futures, CD-ROMs, Child health, Children, Community programs, Families, Guidelines, Health supervision, Infant health, Infants, Injury prevention, Patient care, Prevention services, Preventive health services, Psychosocial development, Regional factors

Millstein SG, Ozer EJ, Ozer EM, Brindis CD, Knopf DK, Irwin CE Jr. 1999. Research priorities in adolescent health: An analysis and synthesis of research recommendations. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent Health Information Center, 137 pp., exec. summ. (15 pp.).

Annotation: This report synthesizes and analyzes research recommendations from reports on adolescent health published over the last decade. It identifies broad-based trends in research priorities, describes gaps in the existing knowledge base, and suggests approaches for developing and implementing a national adolescent research agenda. Priorities for research include adolescent physical, psychological, and social development; social and environmental contexts; health enhancing and health-risk behaviors; and physical and mental disorders. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Health behavior, Mental health, Physical characteristics, Psychosocial development, Research, Research design, Risk factors, Risk taking

Bassuk E. 1999. Homeless Mothers and Children: Longitudinal Study: [Final report]. Newton, MA: Harvard University Medical School, 8 pp.

Annotation: While causes of homelessness can be traced, much is unknown about the course of homelessness over time. By following a sample of homeless and housed families for 24 months and collecting additional data, the study team: (1) Examined the course of homelessness among families and the extent to which it is chronic or episodic; (2) compared factors that increase the risk of homelessness with those that prolong it; (3) examined mediating factors, especially social supports; (4) described the consequences of homelessness for women; and (5) examined the consequences of homelessness, other risk factors, and protective factors on the development, adaptation, and achievement of children. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-158040.

Keywords: Adolescents (not pregnancy related), Families, Homeless Persons, Infants, MCH Research, Mental Health, Nonpregnant women (not otherwise identified as adolescents), Parents, Pregnant women (not otherwise defined as adolescents), Preschool children, Psychosocial Factors, Research, School-age children, Toddlers

Orr S. 1998. Maternal Psychosocial Factors and Use of Well-Child Care: [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University, 64 pp.

Annotation: This study analyzed prenatal data on maternal psychosocial factors (maternal depressive symptoms and exposure to stressors) and the use of prenatal care to determine whether information collected during the prenatal period could be used for early identification of children at increased risk for inadequate prenatal care. The sample for this prospective, epidemiological cohort study consisted of 738 urban African-American women and children of low-income status (all of whom were enrolled in a prior study conducted by the principal investigator). [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-110843.

Keywords: Blacks, Depression, Health Supervision, Immunization, MCH Research, Mental Health, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Psychosocial Factors, Research

Leffert N, Benson P, Roehlkepartain JL. 1997. Starting out right: Developmental assets for children. Minneapolis, MN: Search Institute, 116 pp.

Annotation: This book offers information on the developmental assets needed by children to grow into resilient, socially responsible, and productive adults. The book concentrates on the attitudes, skills and community supports which foster good developmental outcomes in children and youth. A model of forty developmental assets are identified, and information is given on how these forty assets were selected. External assets are categorized as support, empowerment, boundaries, and constructive use of time. Internal assets are categorized as commitment to learning, positive values, social competencies and positive identity. A list of suggested readings is included.

Contact: Search Institute, The Banks Building, 615 First Avenue N.E., Suite 125, Minneapolis, MN 55413, Telephone: (612) 376-8955 Secondary Telephone: (800) 888-7828 Contact Phone: (800) 888-7828 Fax: (612) 376-8956 E-mail: si@search-institute.org Contact E-mail: search@search-institute.org Web Site: http://www.search-institute.org/ $14.95 plus $5.50 shipping and handling for first item, $.25 for each additional item. Document Number: ISBN 1-57482-364-7.

Keywords: Child behavior, Child development, Community role, Emotional maturity, Protective factors, Psychological characteristics, Psychosocial development

Rosenfeld JA, Alley N, Acheson LS, Admire JB , eds. 1997. Women's health in primary care. Baltimore, MD: Williams and Wilkins, 921 pp.

Annotation: This book has been developed for all primary health care providers and discusses women's diseases, beginning with adolescence, and how they differ from the study and treatment of men's diseases. The inadequacy of women's health research is discussed. Topics such as women's health promotion and concerns, and traditional medical, psychological and social concerns throughout the life cycle are included. The book contains extensive charts, graphs, and tables throughout. Appendices include recommendations on preventive services and an age chart for examinations. The book concludes with an index.

Contact: Wolters Kluwer Health, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, P.O. Box 1620, Hagerstown, MD 21741, Telephone: (800) 638-3030 Secondary Telephone: (301) 223-23000 Fax: (301) 223-2400 E-mail: customerservice@lww.com Web Site: http://www.lww.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-683-07366-4.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Breast care, Cardiovascular diseases, Contraception, Endocrine diseases, Gastrointestinal diseases, Gynecological diseases, Health promotion, Lactation, Life cycle, Mental health, Pregnancy, Primary care, Psychosocial factors, Respiratory diseases, Sexuality, Sexually transmitted diseases, Urologic diseases, Violence, Women's health

Falik MM, Collins KS, eds. 1996. Women's health: The Commonwealth Fund survey. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 361 pp.

Annotation: This book, based on in-depth analysis of experiences reported in a 1993 Commonwealth Fund survey, provides baseline information on the psychobehavioral factors that have an impact on women's health. Topics addressed include socioeconomic factors that influence health (insurance, employment, poverty) care-seeking behaviors, psychological factors, and aging. Each chapter analyzes the appropriate survey data, presents findings and integrates the relevant literature, draws implications for policy and health care delivery, and identifies issues for further research.

Keywords: Aging, Behavior, Data analysis, Employment, Health insurance, Health surveys, Poverty, Psychosocial factors, Research, Women's health, Women's health services

Hyman,JW, Rome ER, and Boston Women's Health Book Collective. 1996. Sacrificing our selves for love : why women compromise health, and self-esteem-- and how to stop. Freedom, CA: Crossing Press, 230 pp.

Annotation: This book discusses women's willingness to risk their health as a result of three intertwined forces: the caring attitude that characterizes many women; centuries of subordination; and cultural traditions about how to look, behave, and be treated. Part one topics include eating disorders and how to obtain help, cosmetic surgery and its repercussions, accepting yourself and body imaging. Part two talks about living in abusive relationships, intimate abuse/battering, rape, and how to get help. The third part covers sexuality, reproductive and sexually transmitted diseases, and guidelines for safer sex. An annotated notes section, a resources listing, and an index are provided.

Contact: Ten Speed Press, Crossing Press, P.O. Box 7123, Berkeley, CA 94707, Telephone: (510) 559-1600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 841-2665 Fax: (510) 559-16299 Web Site: http://www.tenspeed.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-89594-743-9.

Keywords: Abuse, Battered women, Consumer education materials, Eating disorders, Plastic surgery, Psychosocial factors, Rape, Reproductive health, Self esteem, Sexually transmitted diseases, Women's health

Musick JS. 1993. Young, poor, and pregnant. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 271 pp.

Annotation: This book discusses the psychological components that accompany adolescent parenthood. The author examines the effect of personal histories as well as broader social factors such as poverty and violence in shaping the psychological development of a adolescent parent. Specific chapters focus on topics such as adolescent psychosocial development, intervention programs, and adolescents as parents.

Contact: Yale University Press, P.O. Box 209040, New Haven, CT 06520-9040, Telephone: (203) 432-0960 Fax: (203) 432-0948 Web Site: http://yalepress.yale.edu/yupbooks/home.asp Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-300-05353-3.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Mental health, Psychological factors, Psychosocial development

Evers-Kiebooms G, Fryns J, Cassiman J, Van den Berghe H, eds. 1992. Psychosocial aspects of genetic counseling: Proceedings of a conference held September 24-26, 1990, Leuven, Belgium. New York, NY: Wiley-Liss, John Wiley and Sons, 203 pp. (Birth defects: Original article series; v. 28, no. 1)

Annotation: These proceedings include contributions on the following psychosocial aspects of genetic counseling: process issues; cross-cultural issues; decision making in the context of genetic risk; the reproductive decision-making process after genetic counseling; support in decision making processes in the post-counseling period; reproductive choices in couples at risk for genetic disease; a protocol to address the depressive effects of abortion for fetal abnormalities discovered prenatally via amniocentesis; psychosocial intervention strategies for professionals; genetic counseling and mental retardation; Prader-Willi syndrome; pitfalls in counseling for predictive testing in Huntington disease; hemophilia and the use of genetic counseling and carrier testing within family networks; psychological implications of genetic screening; and lay conceptions of genetic disorders.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Abortion, Albinism, Fragile X syndrome, Genetic counseling, Genetic counselors, Genetic disorders, Genetic screening, Huntingtons disease, Neurofibromatosis, Prader Willi syndrome, Prenatal diagnosis, Psychosocial factors

Herdt G, ed. 1989. Gay and lesbian youth. Binghamton, NY: Harrington Park Press, 355 pp.

Annotation: This book is a collection of chapters by individual authors that are based on cross-cultural studies of gay, bisexual, and lesbian adolescents. The author s contribute to an overall study of the identities, situations, and relationships of homosexual adolescents in different societies. A background is provided in chapters that examine emerging identities of the adolescents, the formation of their homosexual identities, consider the ethnographic profiles, parental influences on self-esteem. Other chapters focus on growing up lesbian, issues related to male prostitution and homosexuality, and gays and AIDS. Specific chapters examine trends in England, Mexico, Brazil, France, Sweden, Finland, Ireland, and Australia. Possible future research topics are also discussed. The book was also released as a special issue of the "Journal of Homosexuality, " volume 17, numbers 1-4, 1989.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Australia, Brazil, Cultural factors, Demographics, England, Finland, France, Gay youth, Ireland, Lesbians, Mexico, Psychosocial development, Sexual behavior, Sexual development, Sociocultural factors, Sweden, United States

Pantell RH, Lewis CC. 1989. Doctor-child communication: Improving health outcomes. San Francisco, CA: University of California, Department of Pediatrics; Springfield, VA: distributed by National Technical Information Service, 147 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a study which sought to improve the health outcomes for children by improving communications between children, parents, and professionals during medical office visits. The intervention involved a videotape each for the patients, parents, and physicians. The final report describes the methodology, and considers the results of two randomized, controlled clinical trials; and it discusses the results of those trials. One of these was taken of a generalized population, the other focused on a group of children with asthma. The report includes an analysis of the costs and benefits of the study and on the detection and management of psychosocial problems during a medical visit. The authorship for each of the four sections of the final report varies.

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 Contact Phone: (703) 487-4650 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov $27.00 plus $4.00 shipping and handling. Document Number: AHCPR 93-208; NTIS PB94-214368.

Keywords: Asthma, Child health, Children, Children with special health care needs, Communication, Cost effectiveness, Health professionals, Outcome evaluation, Parent professional relations, Psychosocial factors

Wortman C. 1989. SIDS Loss: Psychosocial Impact and Predictors of Coping [Final report]. Stony Brook, NY: University of Michigan, 94 pp.

Annotation: The major purpose of this project was to assess the psychosocial impact of losing an infant to SIDS (i.e., emotional and psychological responses to the loss, and changes in these responses over time), and to identify the predictors of successful adjustment to the loss of an infant to SIDS. Our analyses revealed a number of intriguing findings about the process of coping with a SIDS loss. We found considerable variability in response to the loss; some parents experienced significant distress, while others showed few signs of depression, both shortly after the baby's death and over time. We found no support in our data for the notion that individuals go through stages of emotional response following loss. Moreover, our data suggest that failure to experience significant distress following a SIDS loss is not necessarily indicative of pathology. Those parents who exhibited the most distress at the first assessment (3 weeks after the infant's death) were the ones who continued to show adjustment problems at the 18-month interview. Treatment of parents could be improved through greater awareness of their psychological needs. Data obtained in the longitudinal phase of the project will help in the early identification of those individuals likely to have particular difficulty adjusting to the sudden loss of an infant. Such information may also be useful to investigators interested in designing effective psychological interventions for parents who experience a SIDS loss. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB89-230775.

Keywords: Final reports, Infant death, Psychosocial factors, SIDS: Coping

Lapham EV, Shevlin KM, eds. 1986. Impact of chronic illness on psychosocial stages of human development. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 157 pp.

Annotation: This book discusses the psychosocial impact of chronic illness in the context of eight stages of human development described by Erik Erikson. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Psychosocial factors

Morton CJ, Guendelman SR, eds. 1985. New perspectives on monitoring child and adolescent health. Berkeley, CA: University of California, Maternal and Child Health Program, 157 pp.

Annotation: This monograph is based on the proceedings of an Interdisciplinary Maternal and Child Health Institute held in June 1984. The proceedings focused on data, child health outcomes, psychosocial measures, and their relationships to planning, evaluation, policy, and advocacy.

Contact: University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health, Maternal and Child Health Program, 50 University Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720, Telephone: 510-643-4991 E-mail: whussey@berkeley.edu Web Site: http://mch.berkeley.edu:7068/ Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Data analysis, Monitoring, Psychosocial factors, Statistics

Rubin R. 1984. Maternal identity and the maternal experience. New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company,

Annotation: This book is written for nurses and other health and helping professionals addressing the needs and care of women in the maternity experience, focusing on the pregnant woman's subjective experience. Two case studies of individual women are included. The information in the book was gathered in advanced maternity nursing programs supported by the Children's Bureau and the Maternal-Child Health Services.

Contact: Springer Publishing Company, 11 West 42nd Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10036, Telephone: (877) 687-7476 E-mail: contactus@springerpub.com Web Site: http://www.springerpub.com/ Available in libraries.

Keywords: Pregnancy, Psychosocial factors

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.