Skip Navigation

Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 21 through 40 (982 total).

Healthy Teen Network and ETR Associates. n.d.. Weaving science & practice: Frequently asked questions about science-based approaches. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 20 pp.

Annotation: This document describes seven science-based approaches in adolescent pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infection prevention. Topics include assessment, health education and behavior change theory, logic models, science-based programs, adaptation and fidelity, characteristics of promising programs, and process and outcome evaluation. Additional topics include the benefits of using science-based approaches, ten steps for getting to outcomes, and training and technical assistance.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Assessment, Behavior modification, HIV, Health behavior, Health education, Methods, Models, Outcome evaluation, Prevention programs, Process evaluation, Sexually transmitted diseases

Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness. 2020. Home visiting models: Reviewing evidence of effectiveness. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, annual. (OPRE report #2020-126)

Annotation: This fact sheet describes a systematic review of home visiting research to determine which home visiting program models have sufficient evidence to meet U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) criteria for an "evidence-based early childhood home visiting service delivery model." The brief also summarizes the evidence of effectiveness for the 20 program models that met DHHS criteria. Topics include favorable and sustained program impacts on primary and secondary outcome measures and whether or not the model has been replicated.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Early childhood development, Family support programs, Home visiting, Maternal health, Measures, Model programs, Outcome evaluation, Parenting, Research, School readiness, Sustainability, Young children

Schmidt A, McManus P. 2020. Summary of factors influencing well-care performance in top-performing state Medicaid programs. Washington, DC: National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health; San Francisco, CA: Adolescent and Young Adult National Resource Center, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes factors influencing adolescent well-care performance in six top-performing state Medicaid programs. State Medicaid officials from the states with the highest adolescent well-care visit performance – RI, CT, TX, NY, NH, and MA – were interviewed to understand the factors contributing to their success.

Contact: National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health, 1615 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-1500 Fax: (202) 429-3557 E-mail: info@thenationalalliance.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalalliance.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Evaluation, Evidence based medicine, Health supervision, Medicaid, State programs, Well child care

Child Trends. 2020. Programs for youth and young adults: Science-informed definitions. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 1 web resource.

Annotation: This website offers definitions for terms that may be encountered by practitioners who serve youth and young adults. Terms are defined according to the conceptual model: contexts creating a need for interventions which can in turn improve outcomes for youth and young adults. Examples are provided to help practitioners think about how different interventions help young people respond to the contexts in which they live to improve both their short- and long-term outcomes. Evaluation terms are included.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Dictionaries, Evaluation, Glossaries, Health programs, Young adults

Sama-Miller E, Akers L, Mraz-Esposito A, Zukiewicz M, Avellar S, Paulsell D, Del Grosso P. 2019. Home visiting evidence of effectiveness review: Executive summary and brief. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 21 pp. (OPRE report no. 2017-29)

Annotation: This document provides an overview of the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) review process and a summary of the review results. Contents include a summary of evidence of effectiveness by model and outcome domain, a summary of implementation guidelines for program models with evidence of effectiveness, and a discussion of gaps in the home visiting research literature. The appendix contains a list of the program models reviewed.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Home visiting, MCH research, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Treatment effectiveness evaluation

Michigan Public Health Institute, Center for Child and Family Health. 2019. Varnish! Michigan Babies Too! Program annual report. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Oral Health, 10 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings and recommendations from an evaluation of a program to increase awareness of oral health among health professionals, facilitate the incorporation of oral health into well-child visits, and increase access to preventive care for young children at high risk for dental caries. Topics include a project overview, purpose, key questions, and evaluation methods. Additional topics include findings on health professionals reached, training, confidence in program delivery, program fidelity, health professional satisfaction, supply of fluoride varnish, children reached, and benefits and barriers.

Contact: Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Oral Health, 201 Townsend Street, Box 30195, Lansing, MI 48913, Telephone: (517) 373-3740 Web Site: http://www.michigan.gov/mdch/0,1607,7-132-2942_4911_4912_6226---,00.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental care, Dental caries, Disease prevention, Fluorides, Infants, Medicaid, Michigan, Oral health, Parent education, Preventive health services, Primary care, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Provider participation, Reimbursement, Screening, State programs, Training, Work force, Young children

Szekely A, Gebhard B. 2019. Infants and toddlers in the policy picture: A self-assessment toolkit for states. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 65 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is intended to help state policy leaders and advocates assess the current status of services for infants, toddlers, and their families, and to set priorities for improvement. A user-friendly format allows users to easily access state information from national sources, assess how their state compares to other states, and gather stakeholder input. Topics include an overview, good health, strong families, positive early learning experiences, and collaboration and system building. Additional resources include stakeholder survey questions in an editable Excel format, family survey template as PDF and Survey Monkey templates in English and Spanish, and a list of suggested stakeholders for completing the self-assessment checklist.This toolkit is intended to help state policy leaders and advocates assess the current status of services for infants, toddlers, and their families, and to set priorities for improvement. A user-friendly format allows users to easily access state information from national sources, assess how your state compares to other states, and gather stakeholder input.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early childhood education, Families, Infants, Manuals, Program development, Program evaluation, Public health services, Public policies, Toddlers

Indiana State Department of Health, Oral Health Program. 2018. The use of oral health metrics in promoting oral health. Indianapolis, IN: Indiana State Department of Health, Oral Health Program, 8 pp.

Annotation: The report discusses existing high-quality oral health metrics that are reported periodically. It provides background information about oral health and oral disease and presents a list of metrics that may be valuable as a basis for developing, implementing, and evaluating policies and programs to improve the oral health of Indiana residents. Data sources and data on these metrics are included.

Contact: Indiana State Department of Health, Oral Health Home, 2 N. Meridian Street, Section 7-G, Indianapolis, IN 46204, Telephone: (317) 233-1325 Secondary Telephone: (800) 433-0746 Fax: (317) 233-7001 E-mail: oralhealth@isdh.state.in.us Web Site: http://www.in.gov/isdh/18695.htm

Keywords: Indiana, Oral health, Program development, Program evaluation, Statistical data

Dolce MC, Parker JL, Da Silva JD. 2018. Nurse practitioner & dentist model for primary care: A guide for implementing collaborative care in U. S. dental schools. Boston, MA: Harvard School of Dental Medicine and Northeastern University School of Nursing, 61 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides a framework for implementing the Nurse Practitioner & Dentist Model for Primary Care to integrate primary care services provided by a nurse practitioner into an academic dental practice environment. It discusses steps to take and elements to consider in the planning, implementation, and evaluation phases of initiating a collaborative-care program involving nurse practitioners and dentists. Topics include an overview of the model, getting started, program fundamentals, sustainability, and next steps.

Contact: Harvard School of Dental Medicine, 188 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, Web Site: https://hsdm.harvard.edu

Keywords: Program development, Dentists, Nurse practitioners, Oral health, Primary care, Program evaluation, Service integration

James Bell Associates. 2018. Formative evaluation toolkit: A step-by-step guide and resources for evaluating program implementation and early outcomes. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 65 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit, which is primarily intended for child welfare agencies and professionals to use in partnership with their evaluators, introduces the concept of formative evaluation, a method for evaluating programs during early implementation in order to inform program improvement and assess readiness for rigorous summative evaluation.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Manuals, Program evaluation

Children's Health Alliance of Wisconsin, Wisconsin Head Start Association, Wisconsin Department of Health Services Oral Health Program, Medical College of Wisconsin, Wisconsin Dental Association. 2017. Earlier Is Better: Oral health program for Early Head Start–Final project report . Milwaukee, WI: Children's Health Alliance of Wisconsin, 65 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a partnership to improve oral health in pregnant women and children enrolled in Early Head Start in Wisconsin and, specifically, those enrolled in the home visiting program. Contents include information about data collection and statistical analysis, partnership overview and processes, training for home visitors and parent educators on using the Parent Oral Health Education Toolkit (POHET), changes in oral health knowledge and behaviors for parents and other caregivers after implementation of the POHET, increases in the number of children with a dental home, and reductions in children's dental caries experience at age 3.

Contact: Children's Health Alliance of Wisconsin, 620 South 76th Street, Suite 120, Milwaukee, WI 53214, Telephone: (414) 292-4000 Secondary Telephone: (414) 337-4561 Fax: (414) 231-4972 Web Site: https://www.chawisconsin.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Early Head Start, Health education, Home visiting, Infants, Oral health, Parent education, Pregnant women, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, State programs, Training, Wisconsin, Young children

Byrne J. 2017. Perinatal and infant oral health community of practice: Quality improvement toolkit. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Public Health, Oral Health Program, multiple items. (Version 3: April 10, 2017)

Annotation: This toolkit provides guidance on assessing the effectiveness of a project to improve the delivery of oral health care services provided to pregnant women, infants, and young children by integrating oral health care into primary care. Contents include worksheets and guides for identifying, planning, implementing, and interpreting the effectiveness of a quality-improvement project. Topics include plan, do, study, act cycles and process mapping. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Oral Health Program, MS Code 8305, P.O. Box 997377, MS 0500, Sacramento, CA 95899-7377, Telephone: (916) 558-1784 E-mail: mchinet@cdph.ca.gov Web Site: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CCDPHP/DCDIC/CDCB/Pages/OralHealthProgram/OralHealthProgram.aspx

Keywords: Organizational change, Data collection, Forms, Infant health, Infants, Oral health, Perinatal health, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Program improvement, Qualitative evaluation, Quality assurance, Quantitative evaluation, Records management

Chazin S, Glover J. 2017. A community framework for addressing social determinants of oral health for low-income populations. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 11 pp. (Technical assistance brief)

Annotation: This brief describes a framework for assessing social determinants related to oral health and creating partnerships to improve oral health among children from families with low incomes. Topics include identifying the social determinants of oral health in a community, mapping and mobilizing community resources through partnership, selecting approaches to take action, and evaluating implementation and impact. Contents include example indicators potentially related to oral health, intervention metrics, and how the framework was applied to select an intervention.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Collaboration, Community coordination, Community participation, Low income groups, Models, Needs assessment, Oral health, Outcome evaluation, Process evaluation, Program planning, Public private partnerships, Relationships, Resource allocation

Fertman CI, Allensworth DD, eds. 2017. Health promotion programs: From theory to practice (2nd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons, 496 pp.

Annotation: This book provides an introduction to the foundations of health promotion programs; planning implementing, evaluating, and sustaining health promotion programs; and health promotion programs in diverse settings. Contents include an overview of best practices from schools, health care organizations, workplaces, and communities. Topics include planning programs from the basis of health theory and issues and challenges in the field. Hands-on activities, digital learning aids, and templates and models are included.

Contact: John Wiley and Sons, Corporate Headquarters, 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030, Telephone: (201) 748-6000 Fax: (201) 748-6088 E-mail: info@wiley.com Web Site: http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-119-16333-6.

Keywords: Health promotion, Model programs, Models, Program development, Program evaluation, Program planning, Resources for professionals

Hall E. 2017. Identifying a school quality/student success indicator for ESSA: Requirements and considerations. Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requirements for the inclusion of a school quality or student success indicator (referred to as the "5th indicator), including requirements to ensure that the indicator contributes to a state's system of school and district accountability. Highlights include key factors to consider when identifying, evaluating, and implementing a school quality or student success indicator for inclusion in a state's accountability system. Examples of school quality and student success indicators and research supporting those indicators are included.

Contact: Council of Chief State School Officers, One Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20001-1431, Telephone: (202) 336-7000 Fax: (202) 408-8072 E-mail: info@ccsso.org Web Site: http://www.ccsso.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Evaluation, Limited English speakers, Measures, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Regulations, School districts, Schools, Students, Systems development

Lee M. 2017. Connecticut’s Perinatal and Infant Oral Health Quality Improvement Project: Pregnancy risk assessment monitoring system data for evaluation. New Haven, CT: Connecticut Voices for Children, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) and how PRAMS data can be used for evaluating the Perinatal and Infant Oral Health Quality Improvement project in Connecticut. Topics include births and maternal oral health and health care in Connecticut. Other topics include PRAMS questions on maternal oral health, oral health care for mothers by health insurance status, and implications and alternatives for project evaluation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Connecticut Voices for Children, 33 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06510, Telephone: (203) 498-4240 Fax: (203) 498-4242 E-mail: voices@ctvoices.org Web Site: http://www.ctvoices.org

Keywords: Connecticut, Health care utilization, Low income groups, Medicaid, Oral health, Population surveillance, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Preventive health services, Program evaluation, Risk assessment, State programs, State surveys

McKenzie JF, Neiger RB, Thackery, R. 2017. Planning, implementing, and evaluating health promotion programs: A primer (7th ed.). [New Jersey]: Pearson Education, 478 pp.

Annotation: This book for students who are enrolled in a professional course in health promotion program planning aims to provide both theoretical and practical information. Topics include program planning models, assessing needs, measurement, mission statements, goals, objectives, theories and models commonly used, interventions, community organizing and building, allocation of resources, marketing, implementation, evaluation, and data analysis and reporting,

Keywords: Textbooks, Health promotion, Program development, Program evaluation, Program planning

Oakes J, Maier A, Daniel J. 2017. Community schools: An evidence-based strategy for equitable school improvement. Boulder, CO: National Education Policy Center and Palo Alto, CA: Learning Policy Institute, 26 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines the research on community schools, with two primary emphases. First, it explores whether the 2015 federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) opens the possibility of investing in well-designed community schools to meet the educational needs of low-achieving students in high-poverty schools. And second, it provides support to school, district, and state leaders as they consider, propose, or implement a community school intervention in schools targeted for comprehensive support. An online research compendium summarizing the referenced studies referenced is also available.

Contact: Learning Policy Institute, 1530 Page Mill Road, Suite 200, Palo Alto, CA 94303, Telephone: (650) 332-9797 Web Site: https://learningpolicyinstitute.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Barriers, Collaboration, Community based services, Community development, Costs, Federal legislation, Intervention, Leadership, Policy analysis, Poverty, Program evaluation, Program improvement, Public policy, Public private partnerships, Research, Schools, Service integration, Students, Vulnerability

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health. 2017. The National Preconception Health & Health Care Initiative: W.K. Kellogg Foundation Evaluation Report–April 2017. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the impact of a national preconception outreach and education initiative for young men and women and clinicians. Contents include media metrics following the launch of national consumer website and social media platform to increase the visibility of preconception health messages and provide young adults with essential, evidence-based information to improve their health, reduce their risks, and improve birth outcomes. Topics include launch results and analytic snapshot and information about the related grantee and preconception peer educator ambassador programs. Additional contents summarize the impact of a partnership to integrate preconception health into routine clinical care using a learning collaborative, peer-reviewed publications, a website, traditional media, social media, expanded conversations, conferences and webinars, and a national newsletter.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Communication, Community based services, Mass media, Measures, Men's health, National initiatives, Organizational change, Peer education, Preconception care, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Public awareness campaigns, Public private partnerships, Reproductive health, Screening, Service integration, Technical assistance, Training, Women's health

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2016. State application/annual report. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, multiple items.

Annotation: These applications/annual reports provide data on financial, program, and performance measures for state maternal and child health (MCH) programs. The reports also include a description of the status and activities of each program within the context of its data. Topics include the five-year needs assessment, state-selected priorities, linkage of state priorities to national and state performance and outcome measures, and five-year action plan. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Applications, Community action, Financing, Goals, Measures, Needs assessment, Program descriptions, Program development, Program evaluation, Program planning, Social Security Act, State MCH programs, Statistical data, Title V

« Previous Page     Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.