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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 21 through 40 (107 total).

Potamites E, Gordon A. 2010. Children's food security and intakes from school meals. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica, ca. 135 pp. (Contractor and cooperator report no. 61)

Annotation: This report describes a study that examined the contributions of school meals to the food and nutrient intake of children in food-secure, marginally secure, and food-insecure households. The report includes a description of the data and methods, discusses characteristics of food-insecure and marginally secure students, compares dietary intakes by food security status, and discusses the percentage of school lunch foods consumed and food security and breakfast skipping.

Contact: National Agricultural Library, Abraham Lincoln Building, 10301 Baltimore Avenue, Beltsville, MD 20705-2351, Telephone: (301) 504-5755 Secondary Telephone: (301) 504-6856 Fax: (301) 504-6927 E-mail: lmooney@nal.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.nal.usda.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Food consumption, Hunger, Low income groups, Nutrition, Research, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs

Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. 2010. Report of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on the dietary guidelines for Americans. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion,

Annotation: This report provides evidence-based guidelines and recommendations for halting and reversing the obesity problem in the United States through primary prevention and changes in behavior, the environment, and the food supply. The report discusses setting the stage and integrating the evidence (the total diet and translating and integrating the evidence), presents the methodology, and reviews the science base (energy balance and weight management; nutrient adequacy; fatty acids and cholesterol; protein; carbohydrates; sodium, potassium, and water; alcohol; and food safety and technology). The Web site for the report also includes links to supplementary information related to the report.

Contact: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 1034, Alexandria, VA 22302-1594, Telephone: (703) 305-7600 Fax: (703) 305-3300 E-mail: infocnpp@cnpp.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.cnpp.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior, Environmental factors, Food consumption, Food safety, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Research, Weight management

Sell K, Zlotnik S, Noonan K, Rubin D. 2010. The effect of recession on child well-being: A synthesis of the evidence by PolicyLab, the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Washington, DC: First Focus, 41 pp.

Annotation: This research paper synthesizes evidence of the effects of recession on child well-being. It examines four domains – health, food security, housing stability, and maltreatment – and reviews the relationship of each to the well-being of children during periods of economic downturn. Included are key findings indicating that it can takes years for families to bounce back to their previous income levels after a recession but that public programs play a role in blunting the negative impacts.. The paper presents trend data over time and provides lessons learned from prior recessions in efforts to foster more informed policy making related to child well being.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Data, Economic factors, Family economics, High risk children, Housing, Nutrition, Policy development, Research, Trends

Suitor CW. 2010. Planning a WIC research agenda: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 166 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes information gathered during a public workshop hosted by the Institute of Medicine in July 2010 to discuss the best use of federal funds allocated for research on the short and long term impacts of WIC -- the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, which provides services to low-income, nutritionally at-risk individuals. The document summarizes workshop sessions on research topics including birth outcomes, obesity, breastfeeding protection, food insecurity and hunger, dietary intake and nutritional status, nutritional education, families, and the health care system in general. Proposals for future research include concerns related to methodology as well as data considerations. The full workshop agenda is included as an appendix.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website after registration.

Keywords: Child health, Infant health, Meetings, Nutrition, Reports, Research, Research methodology, Research proposals, Resource allocation, WIC Program, Women's health

Tiehen L, Jacknowitz A. 2010. WIC participation patterns: An investigation of delayed entry and early exit. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 38 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study that examined factors associated with the decisions of households that participate in WIC during the first year after the birth of a child to (1) delay their entry into the WIC program until after the child's birth and (2) exit the program when a child turns 1. The report explains how WIC works and discusses data, methods, and results.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Decision making, Eligibility, Enrollment, Families, Family support programs, Infants, Low income groups, Nutrition, Research, Statistical data, WIC Program, Young children

Children's HealthWatch. 2009. Feeding our futures: Growing up healthy with WIC. [Boston, MA]: Children's HealthWatch, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report provides recommendation to Congress related to the reauthorization of the WIC program. The report provides evidence for the value of reauthorizing the program and discusses who is eligible and what the program provides, what research shows about the program's effectiveness, how the recession will effect WIC enrollment, and whether WIC is cost-effective.

Contact: Children's HealthWatch, Dowling Building, 771 Albany Street, Ground Floor, Boston, MA 02118, Telephone: (617) 414-6366 Fax: (617) 414-7915 E-mail: childrenshealthwatch@childrenshealthwatch.org Web Site: http://www.childrenshealthwatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Costs, Eligibility, Enrollment, Families, Infant health, Low income groups, Nutrition, Poverty, Research, WIC program

Gortmaker S, Long M, Wang YC. 2009. The negative impact of sugar-sweetened beverages on children's health. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Healthy Eating Research, 7 pp.

Annotation: This report examines research studies on the health impacts of sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption; presents initial conclusions based on these studies; and identifies areas for additional research. The report includes a definition of the term, sugar sweetened beverages; describes the connection between SSB consumption and Type 2 diabetes; and discusses children's and adolescents' access to SSBs. Tables indicate trends in children's and adolescent' consumption of SSBs.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Beverages, Child health, Child nutrition, Diabetes mellitus, Research, Sugar, Trends

Millimet DL, Tchernis R, Husain M. 2008. School nutrition programs and the incidence of childhood obesity. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic REsearch, 53 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14297)

Annotation: This paper uses data on over 13,500 early-elementary-school children to assess the relationship between School Breakfast Program and National School Lunch Program participation and child weight. The paper provides background information (on the school nutrition programs themselves as well as on the previous literature), presents a theoretical framework for thinking about school nutrition programs, describes the empirical methodology and data, and presents results.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Body weight, Child health, Low income groups, Nutrition, Obesity, Research, School age children, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs

Briefel RR, Dodd AH, Cabili C, Suitor, CW. 2008. Application of adult-based dietary guidelines to children: Evidence, knowledge gaps, and policy implications—Final report. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica, 128 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the science base for dietary guidance for children, including evidence supporting the 2000 and 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and other contemporary guidance statements. The report describes the literature review methodology and synthesizes the recent evidence for children by dietary guideline topic; provides an analysis of the science base for children; and describes data gaps and research needs and implications of these for revising dietary guidance for children.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Dietary guidelines, Literature reviews, Nutrition, Public policy, Research

Dodd AH, Cabili C, Briefel RR, Williams N, Suitor CW. 2008. Summary of published evidence related to dietary guidelines for children, 2004-2008. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica, 126 pp.

Annotation: This report provides summaries of studies published since the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans that may be relevant to the 2010 dietary guidelines. Studies are grouped into the following categories: (1) adequate nutrients within calorie needs, (2) weight management, (3) fats, (4) fruits and vegetables, (5) whole grains, (6) dairy and calcium, (7) carbohydrates, (8) sodium and potassium, and (9) tracking.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Calories, Dietary guidelines, Nutrients, Nutrition, Obesity, Research, Weight management

McGinnis JM, Gootman JA, Kraak VI, eds.; Committee on Food Marketing and the Diets of Children and Youth. 2006. Food marketing to children and youth: Threat or opportunity?. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 516 pp.

Annotation: This book reviews scientific studies designed to assess the influence of marketing on the nutritional beliefs, choices, practices, and outcomes for children and youth. Chapter topics include health, diet, and eating patterns; food and beverage marketing; the influence of marketing on the diets and diet-related health of children and youth; and public policy issues in food and beverage marketing. Findings, recommendations, and next steps are summarized at the conclusion. References are provided at the end of each chapter. Appendices include a list of acronyms, a glossary, a literature review, statistical tables and more references, as well as an agenda of a workshop program held January 27, 2005 and biographical sketches of committee members and staff.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-09713-4.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent nutrition, Child health, Child nutrition, Diet, Food consumption, Food habits, Literature reviews, Market research

Neumark-Sztainer D. 2006. Project EAT-II: A longitudinal study [Final report]. Minneapolis, MN: Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, 26 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the second phase, from 2002 to 2006, of a project to follow up on a longitudinal study of previously studied adolescents to examine how weight status and dietary intake change as youth progress through adolescence and become more independent. Results provide insight into the most potent and predictive factors influencing weight status and dietary intake that need to be addressed in public health interventions. Contents include a description of the nature of the research problem, a review of the literature, study design and methods, a presentation of the findings, a discussion section, a list of products produced during the study, and references. A more extensive list of project publications is provided in the appendix.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Body weight, Dietary assessment, Final reports, MCH research, Nutrition, Weight management, Young adults

Lee BJ, Mackey-Bilaver L, and Chin, . 2006. Effects of WIC and food stamp program participation on child outcomes. Washington, DC: Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 41 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the relationship between between WIC and Food Stamp Program participation and young children's health and mistreatment outcomes. The report, which includes an abstract and a summary, discusses the background of WIC and the Food Stamp Program, previous research, hypotheses, data and variables, statistical methods, findings, and limitations of the research and future directions. Conclusions and references are included. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. The report includes two appendices: (1) program participation and adverse health outcomes and (2) logistic regression results: WIC and Food Stamp Program Effects in Child Outcomes.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition, Federal programs, Food Stamp Program, MCH research, Maltreated children, Nutrition programs, Outcome evaluation, WIC Program, Young children

Gleason P, Burghardt J. 2005. The National School Lunch Program: Ensuring that free and reduced-price meal benefits go to the poor. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica, 4 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief summarizes recent studies conducted by Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., for the Department of Agriculture to assess National School Lunch Program (NSLP) policies on program integrity and access. The brief discusses improving the process of approving children for inclusion in the NSLP, eligibility requirements, using income data from other programs to establish eligibility, and future directions for policy. References are included. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Eligibility, Low income groups, National programs, Nutrition, Public policy, Research, School lunch programs

ORC Macro. 2005. Developing effective wording and format options for a children's nutrition behavior questionnaire for mothers of children in kindergarten. Washington, DC: Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 108 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study focusing on a set of eating habit questions proposed for including in the U.S. Department of Education's Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey, Birth Cohort. The study assesses the wording and format of a series of questions for mothers of children in kindergarten and/or first grade regarding the child's food consumption habits. The report, which includes an abstract and an executive summary, also provides an introduction to the research, an overview of the research design, a description of the methodology, a discussion of the development of the study guides, findings, and conclusions and recommendations. Two appendices include several data collection guides.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Food consumption, Food habits, Mothers, Nutrition, Questionnaires, Research, Surveys

Walker JN, Del Rosso JM, Held AK. 2005. Nutrition and physical activity field assessment of children in rural America. Wesport, CT: Save the Children, 37 pp.

Annotation: This assessment of nutrition and physical activity status of children in rural areas consisted of in-depth interviews and focus groups with 45 partner communities in Kentucky, West Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee, Arizona, New Mexico, and California. The report, which includes an executive summary and an overview of obesity prevalence, causes, and consequences, presents findings on the problems of obesity among rural children and on types of interventions to prevent it. The report offers a strategy for preventing obesity among children in rural America. Four appendices include a list of partner sites, sample elementary school breakfast and lunch menus, a list of obesity-related legislation passed during 1999-2003 by Save the Children states, and a list of related initiatives.

Contact: Save the Children, 501 Kings Highway East, Fairfield, CT 06825, Telephone: (203) 221-4000 Web Site: http://www.savethechildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition, Community programs, Focus groups, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Research, Rural populations

Burghardt J, Gleason P, Sinclair M, Cohen R, Hulsey L, Milliner-Waddell J. 2004. Evaluation of the National School Lunch Program Application/Verification Pilot Projects: Volume II—Data collection, study methods and supplementary tables on certification impacts. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 96 pp.

Annotation: This report, the second of two volumes, presents the results of an evaluation of two approaches tested in the National School Lunch Program Application/Verification Pilot Projects: upfront documentation and verification. This volume provides a detailed description of the methods used to conduct the study, and presents tabulations that supplement and extend the analyses reported in Volume 1. It is divided into the following sections: (1) comparison site selection and recruitment, (2) sample design and sample selection, (3) survey data collection, (4) comparing planned and actual sample sizes and precision, (5) updating meal price status, (6) survey weighting procedures and population estimates, (7) weighting methodology, (8) impact and analysis estimation methods, and (9) supplementary tabulation. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report also includes an evaluation postcard and references.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com $13.75, plus shipping and handling; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child nutrition programs, Data collection, Data collection, National programs, Pilot projects, Program evaluation, Research methods, School food services, School lunch programs, Surveys

Bitler MP, Currie J. 2004. Does WIC work?: The effects of WIC on pregnancy and birth outcomes. Santa Monica, CA: Rand; Los Angeles, CA: University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Economics, 27 pp.

Annotation: This paper evaluates the possible selection problem upon which support for WIC is based, that is, the belief that WIC works and the fact that most WIC research fails to properly control for selection into the program. The paper evaluates the selection problem and investigates the effects of WIC on maternal and infant health using rich data from the national Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System. The paper provides background, discusses the data and methods, provides results, and offers a discussion and conclusions. Statistics are presented in tables at the end of the report. References and footnotes are included.

Contact: University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Economics, Box 951477, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1477, Telephone: (310) 825-1011 Fax: (310) 825-9528 Web Site: http://www.econ.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Data, Federal programs, Infant health, Low income groups, Nutrition, Program evaluation, Research, WIC Program, Women's health

Flournoy R, Yen I. 2004. Influence of community factors on health: An annotated bibliography. Oakland, CA: PolicyLink, 94 pp. (A PolicyLink report)

Annotation: This bibliography provides information into the ways that researchers have investigated community effects on health, their findings, and the program and policy implications that researchers have drawn from their work. Section 1 includes research on how living in a particular neighborhood affects health. Section 2 focuses on how communities that are defined by shared characteristics or experiences, rather than by a shared neighborhood, can influence health.

Contact: PolicyLink, 1438 Webster Street, Suite 303, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 663-2333 Fax: (510) 663-9684 E-mail: info@policylink.org Web Site: http://www.policylink.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption behavior, Bibliographies, Communities, Drug use behavior, Economic factors, Environmental factors, Health, Nutrition, Physical activity, Racial factors, Research, Smoking

Food and Nutrition Board, Committee on the Evaluation of the Addition of Ingredients New to Infant Formula. 2004. Infant formula: Evaluating the safety of new ingredients. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 206 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses the regulatory and research issues that are critical in assessing the safety of the addition of new ingredients to infant formulas. It begins with an overview of infant formula regulations and guidelines and the rationale for the report. Chapter 2 reviews the parameters considered by the committee when defining "safety" and how to approach it from a practical, theoretical, and statistical point of view. Chapter 3 compares how biological and behavioral advantages of human milk with infant formulas and reviews how infant formulas were developed to meet the biological advantages of human milk. The remainder of the report reviews the current regulatory processes involved in evaluating infant formulas and provides recommendations for the overall process, preclinical studies, clinical studies, and in-market surveillance. The appendices include acronyms and a glossary, composition of infant formulas and human milk for feeding tern infants in the United States, the Redbook table of contents, applying the recommended approaches, and biographical sketches of committee members. References are provided at the end of each chapter.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-09150-0.

Keywords: Child development, Food safety, Infant formula, Infant nutrition, Milk, Nutrition assessment, Nutrition research

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.