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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 21 through 40 (291 total).

Moehling CM, Thomasson MA. 2012. Saving babies: The contribution of Sheppard-Towner to the decline in infant mortality in the 1920s. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 34 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17996)

Annotation: This paper examines a program that provided matching grants to states to fund maternal and infant care education initiatives and the reduction in infant mortality that occurred in the United States during the early twentieth century. The goal of the paper is to disentangle the effect of the Promotion of the Welfare and Hygiene of Maternity and Infancy Act (more commonly known as the Sheppard-Towner Act) on infant mortality from its preexisting downward trend. The authors assess the impact of Sheppard-Towner grants and public health expenditure measures on infant mortality as well as the impact of specific state activities such as nurse visits, conferences, literature, public health centers, and classes for midwives. Background information on infant mortality and the Children's Bureau, a description of the data and methods, results, and references are included.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website after registration.

Keywords: Federal programs, History, Infant care, Infant mortality, Legislation, Maternal health services, Public health education, Research, State initiatives

Heisler EJ. 2012. The U.S. infant mortality rate: International comparisons, underlying factors, and federal programs. Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service, 30 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the high U.S. infant mortality rate (IMR) relative to other developed countries and efforts to reduce the IMR. The report identifies a number of causes of U.S. infant mortality but focuses on low birthweight and short-gestational-age births because the United States has relatively high and increasing rates of these births and research has found that these births can be reduced through policy interventions.The report first examines international IMR comparisons and discusses geographic variation in state IMRs. Next, the report examines mothers' demographic characteristics and various health system characteristics that may influence the U.S. IMR. The report then describes a number of federal programs that may indirectly reduce the IMR. Finally, the report summarizes federal initiatives included in the Affordable Care Act that may reduce infant mortality.

Contact: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service, 101 Independence Avenue, S.E., Washington, DC 20540-7500, Fax: Web Site: http://www.loc.gov/crsinfo Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Gestational age, Health care reform, Infant mortality, International health, Legislation, Low birthweight, Program improvement, Research, Statistics

Davis C. 2012. Improving oral health care: ACA initiatives and IOM recommendations. Washington, DC: National Health Law Program, 10 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief describes the problem of poor oral health care in the United States. The brief discusses solutions suggested by Institute of Medicine reports published in 2011 and Affordable Care Act provisions intended to positively impact oral health care in the country.

Contact: National Health Law Program, 1441 I Street, N.W., Suite 1105, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 289-7724 E-mail: nhelp@healthlaw.org Web Site: http://www.healthlaw.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Dental care, Federal legislation, Health care reform, Health policy, Oral health, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2012. 2012 environmental justice strategy and implementation plan. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 74 pp.

Annotation: This plan provides direction for U.S. Department of Health and Human Service (HHS) efforts to achieve environmental justice as part of its mission by (1) identifying and addressing disproportionately high and adverse human health and environmental effects on populations with low incomes and Indian tribes and (2) encouraging the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of affected parties with the goal of building healthy, resilient communities and reducing disparities in health and well-being associated with environmental factors. The document outlines the following four strategic elements: policy development and dissemination; education and training; research and data collection, analysis, and use; and services. Each element is aligned with targeted goals, strategies, and actions to be undertaken by HHS.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Environment, Federal initiatives, Hazards, Health policy, Legislation, Regulations, Strategic plans

Danaher J. 2011. Eligibility policies and practices for young children under Part B of IDEA. [Rev. ed.]. Chapel Hill, NC: National Early Childhood Technical Assistance System, 21 pp. (NECTAC notes; no. 27)

Annotation: This document reflects the requirements and options to states under the Amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of 1997 (P.L. 105-17). The relevant portion of the IDEA statute is included in the paper as are relevant sections from the current and the proposed federal regulations. Finally, analyses are presented of data gathered by the author from the states and jurisdictions regarding their eligibility criteria and classifications.

Contact: Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, Campus Box 8040, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040, Telephone: (919) 962-2001 Secondary Telephone: (919) 843-3269 Fax: 919.966.7463 E-mail: ectacenter@unc.edu Web Site: http://ectacenter.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Education, Eligibility, Federal legislation, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Part B

Danaher J, Goode S, Lazara A. 2011. Part C updates. (12th ed.). Chapel Hill, NC: National Early Childhood Technical Assistance System, annual.

Annotation: This publication provides a compilation of resources on the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Section I contains information on Part C program administration, funding appropriations, and trend data related to the numbers of children served, the settings in which children receive services and the status of children exiting Part C. Section II contains information on Part C program implementation, including: states' Part C rules, regulations and policies; OSEP policy letters related to Part C; state requirements for Part C providers; state practices related to early identification of very young children with autism; promising practices for promoting the social-emotional well-being of infants and toddlers receiving early intervention services; and state efforts to meet the early childhood transition requirements of IDEA. Section III includes federal and state level Part C program contact information. Previous Editions of the Part C Updates are available from the website.

Contact: Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, Campus Box 8040, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040, Telephone: (919) 962-2001 Secondary Telephone: (919) 843-3269 Fax: 919.966.7463 E-mail: ectacenter@unc.edu Contact E-mail: nectasta.nectas@mhs.unc.edu Web Site: http://ectacenter.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Early intervention, Federal legislation, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Part C, Infants with special health care needs, Program evaluation, Program management, State programs, Toddlers

U.S. Congress, Senate. 2011. Stillbirth and SUID Prevention, Education, and Awareness Act. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 24 pp.

Annotation: This document contains the original language as introduced in November 2011, to amend the Public Health Service Act to improve the health of children and reduce the occurrence of sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) and to enhance public health activities related to stillbirth. Topics include improving the completion of death scene investigation and autopsy; training on death scene investigation; building state capacity and implementing state and local child death review programs and prevention strategies; establishing a national registry for SUID and sudden unexpected death in childhood; establishing and implementing a culturally competent public health awareness and education campaign including educating individuals about safe sleep environments, sleep positions, and reducing exposure to smoking during pregnancy and after birth; establishing grants for providing support services to families who have had a infant or child die of sudden unexpected death; evaluating state and regional needs; and enhancing public health activities related to stillbirth.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child death, Data collection, Federal legislation, Fetal death, MCH research, Neonatal death, Prevention, SIDS, Sudden unexpected infant death

Lucas A, Hurth J, Kasprzak C, eds. 2011. Essential elements of high performing, high quality Part C systems. Chapel Hill, NC: National Early Childhood Technical Assistance System, 4 pp. (NECTAC notes; no. 25)

Annotation: This document reflects the requirements and options to states under the Amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of 1997 (P.L. 105-17). The relevant portion of the IDEA statute is included in the paper as are relevant sections from the current and the proposed federal regulations. Finally, analyses are presented of data from the states and jurisdictions regarding their eligibility criteria and classifications.

Contact: Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, Campus Box 8040, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040, Telephone: (919) 962-2001 Secondary Telephone: (919) 843-3269 Fax: 919.966.7463 E-mail: ectacenter@unc.edu Web Site: http://ectacenter.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Education, Eligibility, Federal legislation, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Part C

Basini LO. 2011. What a difference a dollar makes: Affordability lessons from children's coverage programs that can inform state policymaking under the Affordable Care Act. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 11 pp. (State health policy briefing)

Annotation: This policy brief examines the affordability of coverage options that will become available as states implement the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). It describes what is meant by the term affordability and examines the concept of affordability within the context of healthcare reform. Drawing on lessons learned from successful children's health insurance programs (CHIP) in various states, the brief also provides guidance intended to help inform state policymakers.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children's Health Insurance Program, Federal legislation, Models, National health care reform, Policy development, State programs

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2011. About CAPTA: A legislative history. Washington, DC: U.S Department of Health and Human Services, Children's Bureau, 3 pp. (Factsheet)

Annotation: This factsheet summarizes the legislative history and purpose of the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA), the key federal legislation addressing child abuse and neglect. CAPTA was originally enacted in P.L. 93-247 and was most recently amended and reauthorized on December 20, 2010, by the CAPTA Reauthorization Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-320). CAPTA provides federal funding to states in support of prevention, assessment, investigation, prosecution, and treatment activities and also provides grants to public agencies and nonprofit organizations, including Indian Ttibes and tribal organizations, for demonstration programs and projects.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child maltreatment, Child neglect, Federal legislation

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2011. Major federal legislation concerned with child protection, child welfare, and adoption. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 23 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes federal legislation that has helped shape the delivery of child welfare services in the United States. It includes a timeline of the federal legislation that has significantly impacted child protection, social welfare, and adoption since 1974. An overview of each act and its major provisions is also included. The online version provides links to the federal legislation.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child protective services, Child welfare, Federal legislation, Service delivery

Grantmakers In Health. 2011. Covering children under the Affordable Care Act: Minding the gaps. Washington, DC: Grantmakers In Health, 2 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This issue brief focuses on the issue of which children will be covered under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and which are vulnerable to being excluded. The paper presents the components of the ACA that are likely to affect coverage for children and discusses employer-sponsored insurance, eligibility variations within families, and children in split families. The federal-state implementation project is also discussed.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Eligibility, Families, Federal legislation, Health insurance, State programs, Uninsured persons

Osborn D, Hinkle L, Hanlon C, Rosenthal J. 2011. Reducing racial and ethnic disparities through health care reform: State experiences. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 10 pp. (Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP))

Annotation: This issue brief describes how states can use disparities data to inform their actions and provides examples of how health equity can be integrated into health care reform and insurance exchange implementation. It also discusses key provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) that support the reduction of disparities and the opportunities provided by the ACA for state action. Lessons learned from efforts to integrate disparities reduction in the state of Maryland are highlighted. The brief was prepared by the National Academy of State Health Policy (NASHP) for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Data linkage, Ethnic factors, Federal legislation, Health care reform, Health status, Minority health, Racial factors, State initiatives, disparities

National Conference of State Legislatures. 2011. Health reform and abortion coverage in the insurance exchanges. Denver, CO: National Conference of State Legislatures,

Annotation: This report discusses insurance coverage of abortion in state insurance exchanges under the Affordable Care Act which was enacted in March 2010. The report includes links to the Special Rules (Section 1303) of the act and to the related White House executive order, which contain the new provisions. State laws that restrict insurance coverage for abortion in insurance exchanges (created after the enactment of the Affordable Care Act) are listed, and, for each state, a link to the specific legislation is provided. States that had laws restricting insurance coverage for abortion before enactment of the act are also listed, with links to specific legislation.

Contact: National Conference of State Legislatures, 7700 East First Place, Denver, CO 80230, Telephone: (303) 364-7700 Fax: (303) 364-7800 Web Site: http://www.ncsl.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Federal legislation, Health care reform, Health insurance, State health care reform, State legislation

U.S. Children's Bureau. 2011. Tip sheet for early childhood-child welfare partnership: Policies and programs that promote educational access, stability, and success for vulnerable children and families. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 2 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides information about federal polices and programs that promote access to high-quality, stable early care and education for children in the child welfare system and opportunities for strengthening collaborations between early childhood and child welfare systems. The tip sheet discusses the following topics: (1) Head Start eligibility, (2) child care subsidies, (3) child abuse prevention and treatment, and (4) use of Title IV-E funds. The following opportunities are also presented: (1) the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008, (2) the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program, and (3) state advisory councils.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child abuse, Child care, Child welfare agencies, Collaboration, Costs, Early childhood education, Eligibility, Federal programs, Financing, Foster children, Head Start, Home visiting, Legislation, Prevention, Public policy, Service delivery systems, State programs, Treatment, Young children

National Maternal and Child Oral Health Policy Center. 2011. Exchanges and dental coverage: Building on an employer base. Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Policy Center, 4 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief provides an overview of private dental insurance coverage, who has coverage and how they obtain it, and the possible impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on employer-sponsored dental benefits. Topics addressed include employer insurance purchasing patterns, state exchanges, and coverage for children and families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Child health, Children, Employee benefits, Employer initiatives, Federal legislation, Financing, Health insurance, Oral health, Public policy, State initiatives

U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2011. Adolescent health webinar. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, (Leading health indicators webinar)

Annotation: This webcast is the first installment of the monthly "Who's Leading the Leading Health Indicators?" series. The series highlights organizations using evidence-based approaches to address a Healthy People 2020 leading health indicator (LHI) topic. The webcast provides information about access to health services. The webcast showcases the Southside Healthcare Collaborative, which provides health services for residents of Chicago's south side. The presenters also discuss access to heath care as an administration priority; access to health insurance; access to a usual primary care health professional; and federal actions, including the Affordable Care Act.

Contact: U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite LL100, Rockville, MD 20852, Fax: (240) 453-8282 E-mail: odphpinfo@hhs.gov Web Site: https://health.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Federal programs, Health insurance, Health promotion, Health services, Healthy People 2020, Legislation, Prevention, Primary care

Lyon M, Markus AR, Rosenbaum S. [2010]. The Affordable Care Act, medical homes, and childhood asthma: A key opportunity for progress. New York, NY: RCHN Community Health Foundation, 12 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief reviews the key provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) that advance the concept of the medical home in public and private health insurance and recommends ways the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services can use the medical home model to advance the management and treatment of childhood asthma. The brief focuses on how the medical home model facilitates comprehensive care by fostering partnerships between patients, primary care doctors, and other health providers and highlights the potential role of community health centers (CHCs) -- one of the providers PPACA designates as a health home -- in treating children with asthma. The report demonstrates how medical home performance can be measured using evidence based on the treatment and management of childhood asthma.

Contact: RCHN Community Health Foundation, 1633 Boradway, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10019, Telephone: (212) 246-1122 x700 E-mail: info@RCHNfoundation.org Web Site: http://www.rchnfoundation.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Child health, Federal legislation, Health care reform, Medical home, Model programs

Sedlak AJ, Mettenburg J, Basena M, Petta I, McPherson K, Green A, Li S. 2010. Fourth national incidence study of child abuse and neglect (NIS-4): Report to Congress. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation and the Children's Bureau, ca. 450 pp., exec. summ. (22 pp.)

Annotation: This report presents findings from a study to estimate the incidence of child abuse and neglect in the United States, measure changes in these estimates from earlier studies, and examine the distribution of child maltreatment in relation to various demographic factors. Contents include descriptions of the study design and methodology and national estimates of the incidence of children who are abused and neglected. Topics include the nature and severity of maltreatment, the relation between incidence rates and demographic factors, characteristics of the perpetrators, the sources who recognized the children, and the percentages of these children investigated by child protective service agencies.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Child protective services, Data, Federal legislation, Maltreated Children, National initiatives, Studies

Parisi L, Bruno R. 2010. Dental and mental health benefit: Improvements in CHIPRA. Washington, DC: Families USA, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes provisions in the Children’s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009, explains what states must do to comply with the law, and discusses the options that states have to expand access to oral health and mental health care for children from families with low incomes. Topics include mandatory and optional dental benefits, optional wraparound coverage, quality and access to oral health care, and mental health parity. Action steps for states are included.

Contact: Families USA, 1225 New York Avenue, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 628-3030 Fax: (202) 347-2417 E-mail: info@familiesusa.org Web Site: http://www.familiesusa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Benefits, Child health, Children, Children's Health Insurance Program, Dental care, Federal legislation, Mental health services, Oral health, Quality assurance, State programs

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.