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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 21 through 40 (59 total).

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. 2011–. County health rankings and roadmaps. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, multiple items.

Annotation: This website provides access to 50 state reports, ranking counties within the 50 states according to its health outcomes and the multiple health factors that determine a county's health. Each county receives a summary rank for its health outcomes and health factors and also for each of four health factors: health behaviors, clinical care, social and economic factors, and the physical environment. Users can drill down to see specific county-level data (as well as state benchmarks) for the measures upon which the rankings are based. The website contains information on the approach, ranking methods, action steps, and descriptions of health improvement efforts from around the country.

Contact: University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Population Health Sciences, 610 Walnut Street, 575 WARF, Madison, WI 53726, Telephone: (608) 263-6294 Fax: (608) 262-6404 E-mail: UWPHI@med.wisc.edu Web Site: http://uwphi.pophealth.wisc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Environmental influences, Health behavior, Health services, Health status, Online systems, Public health, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical data

Currie J. 2011. Inequality at birth: Some causes and consequences. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 42 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 16798)

Annotation: This paper offers evidence on the issue of whether families with low incomes and those who are members of minority groups are disproportionately exposed to environmental hazards. The paper reviews some evidence about the determinants of health at birth and focuses in particular on prenatal exposure to pollution. Topics include endowments at birth and future outcomes and health at birth and environmental justice.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Educational attainment, Environmental influences, Environmental pollution, Families, Infant health, Low birthweight, Low income groups, Racial factors

Fletcher JM, Waite LJ, Brooks-Gunn J, Reiss AL. 2011. Scientific Vision Workshop on Behavior: Workshop white paper. [Rockville, MD]: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 7 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides information from a workshop held in Bethesda, Maryland, on February 17-19, 2011, that addressed issues in the domain of behavior that are potential priorities for research over the next decade because they could substantively impact research and practice. Major issues discussed include (1) normative developmental trajectories, (2) impact of environmental factors on behavioral development, (3) understanding behavior in social, economic, and cultural contexts, (4) comprehensive integrated modeling of neurobiological, genetic, and environmental mechanisms underlying behavioral development, (5) phenotypic descriptions of behaviors that cut across typical and atypical development,(6) understanding dimensionality in typical and atypical development, (7) self-regulation of behavior and executive functions, and (8) promoting healthy development.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior, Cultural factors, Development, Economic factors, Environmental influences, Genetics, Health promotion, Research

Knittel CR, Miller DL, Sanders NJ. 2011. Caution drivers! Children present: Traffic, pollution, and infant health. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 43 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17222)

Annotation: This paper examines the impact of modern air pollution levels on infant health and the impact of automobile driving on ambient air pollution levels. The authors pull from four separate data sets to investigate the relationships between traffic, weather, pollution, and infant outcomes, focusing their research primarily on the Central Valley and southern portions of California. The findings suggest that ambient pollution levels have an impact on infant mortality rates. The results, which are presented in the form of tables and figures, also illustrate the significance of weather controls in measuring pollution’s impact on infant mortality.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website, after registration.

Keywords: Air pollution, Environmental factors, Environmental pollution, Infant health, Infant mortality, Research, Traffic

Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 2011. Place matters for health: Addressing the root causes of racial and ethnic health inequities. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the Place Matters program, an initiative of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies that seeks to improve the health of communities by addressing conditions in the built environment, social environment, and natural environment that contribute to poor health. The fact sheet highlights findings from recent studies of the costs associated with health and health care inequalities and describes how the Place Matters initiative aims to address social determinants of health at the community level.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community role, Environmental influences, Health status disparities, Minority groups, Social factors, Studies

Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. 2011. Place Matters National Conference. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies,

Annotation: This website describes the Place Matters Conference (sponsored by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Policy Studies Health Policy Institute ) which took place in September 2011. Building on the Joint Center's Place Matters initiative to built the capacity of local leaders to address social determinants of health in their own communities, the event addressed the relationship between place and health, particularly as it pertains to racial and ethnic health inequities. The site includes links to the conference program, photos and presentations, and related reports and fact sheets.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community role, Conference proceedings, Electronic publications, Environmental influences, Ethnic factors, Health status disparities, Minority groups, Policy, Racial factors, Social factors

Adelman L, Lomonaco CG, von Hemert C. 2011. The Raising of America: Early Childhood and the Future of Our Nation–Needs ascertainment report. San Francisco, CA: California Newsreel, 108 pp.

National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition. 2010-. Maternal and child health webinar series. Alexandria, VA: National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition,

Annotation: This series focusing on maternal and child health comprises webinars on a variety of topics, including (among others) mental health before, during, and after pregnancy; acute stress disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and postpartum depression in parents of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit; preventing child death resulting from hyperthermia in cars and trucks; and reducing the effects of postpartum depression. For each webinar, slides and the recording may be downloaded from the website.

Contact: National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition, 4401 Ford Avenue, Suite 300***OPERATIONS MOVED TO ZERO TO THREE*** 5/5/2015, Alexandria, VA 22302, Telephone: (703) 837-4792 Fax: (703) 664-0485 E-mail: info@hmhb.org Web Site: http://www.hmhb.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child death, Child health, Environmental factors, Health promotion, Infant death, Infant health, Nutrition, Obesity, Postpartum depression, Prevention, Reproductive health, Resource materials, Safety, Women's health

Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. 2010. Report of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on the dietary guidelines for Americans. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion,

Annotation: This report provides evidence-based guidelines and recommendations for halting and reversing the obesity problem in the United States through primary prevention and changes in behavior, the environment, and the food supply. The report discusses setting the stage and integrating the evidence (the total diet and translating and integrating the evidence), presents the methodology, and reviews the science base (energy balance and weight management; nutrient adequacy; fatty acids and cholesterol; protein; carbohydrates; sodium, potassium, and water; alcohol; and food safety and technology). The Web site for the report also includes links to supplementary information related to the report.

Contact: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 1034, Alexandria, VA 22302-1594, Telephone: (703) 305-7600 Fax: (703) 305-3300 E-mail: infocnpp@cnpp.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.cnpp.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior, Environmental factors, Food consumption, Food safety, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Research, Weight management

Schwarz SW, Peterson J. 2010. Adolescent obesity in the United States: Facts for policymakers. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 4 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet about adolescent obesity in the United States introduces the issue, presents facts about obesity and nutrition, discusses system-level challenges to preventing and combating adolescent obesity, and provides recommendations.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Costs, Environmental factors, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention

Board on Children, Youth, and Families, Committee on the Science of Adolescence. 2010. The science of adolescent risk-taking: Workshop report. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 130 pp.

Annotation: This book summarizes presentations and discussions from three workshops convened by the Committee on the Science of Adolescence, Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council to address threats to adolescents' health and well-being that inhere in their inclination to engage in risky and reckless behavior. The book is intended to introduce readers to a small portion of current theory and research on contributors to risk behavior in adolescence in order to stimulate further work on the subject. Topics include the risks that affect adolescents, the psychology of adolescence, the influence of the environment, and looking to the future.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-15853-2.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Environmental influences, High risk groups, Psychology, Research, Risk factors, Risk taking

Jones L, Parker JD, Mendola P. 2010. Blood lead and mercury levels in pregnant women in the United States, 2003-2008. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 7 pp. (NCHS data brief, no. 52)

Annotation: This report presents geometric mean lead and mercury blood levels of pregnant women in the United States. The report compares mercury and lead levels by pregnant vs. non-pregnant women, by women's ages, for pregnant women with no prior pregnancies vs. those with prior pregnancies, by education level, by race and ethnicity, and by Mexican-American women born in Mexico vs. those born in the United States.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Educational attainment, Environmental exposure, Ethnic factors, Immigrants, Lead poisoning, Mercury, Pregnant women, Racial factors, Statistical data

Berliner DC. 2009. Poverty and potential: Out-of-school factors and school success. Tempe, AZ: Education Policy Research Unit, Arizona State University; Boulder, CO: Education and the Public Interest Center, University of Colorado, 52 pp.

Annotation: This brief details six out-of-school factors (OSFs) common among families with low incomes that significantly affect children's health and learning opportunities, and accordingly limit what schools can accomplish on their own: (1) low birthweight and non-genetic prenatal influences on children; (2) inadequate medical, dental, and vision care, often a result of inadequate or no medical insurance; (3) food insecurity; (4) environmental pollutants; (5) family relations and family stress; and (6) neighborhood characteristics. Also discussed is a seventh OSF, extended learning opportunities, such as pre-school, after school, and summer school programs that can help to mitigate some of the harm caused by the first six factors.

Contact: Education and the Public Interest Center, University of Colorado at Boulder, School of Education, 249 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0249, Telephone: (303) 492-6937 E-mail: epic@colorado.edu Web Site: http://www.colorado.edu/UCB/AcademicAffairs/education/centersoutreach/epic.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, Child development, Child health, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Education, Environmental factors, Families, Low birthweight, Low income groups, Neighborhoods, Parent child relations, Programs, School readiness, Schools, Stress, Uninsured persons

Agarwal N, Banternghansa C, Bui L. 2009. Toxic exposure in America: Estimating fetal and infant health outcomes. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 56 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14977)

Annotation: The paper examines the effect of exposure to toxic releases on infant and fetal mortality rates in the United States between 1989 and 2002, and presents data, methodology, results, study diagnostics, and policy implications.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Environmental factors, Fetal mortality, Infant mortality, Poisoning

Sen B, Menneneyer S, Gary LC. 2009. The relationship between neighborhood quality and obesity among children. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 38 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14985)

Annotation: This paper explores whether maternal perceptions of neighborhood quality affect children's outcomes, and whether racial and ethnic differences in such perceptions may explain any of the hitherto unexplained gap in body weight and obesity prevalence among whites and minorities.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Body weight, Children, Environmental factors, Ethnic groups, Neighborhoods, Obesity

Sandy R, Liu G, Ottensmann J, Tchernis R, Wilson J, Ford OT. 2009. Studying the child obesity epidemic with natural experiments. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 51 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14989)

Annotation: This paper examines clinical records of successive visits by children to pediatric clinics in Indianapolis to estimate the effects on their body weight of environmental changes near their homes. Environmental factors include fast food restaurants, supermarkets, parks, trails, and violent crimes, and 13 types of recreational amenities derived from the interpretation of annual aerial photographs. The paper contains a literature review, and describes its data, its estimation strategy, results, and conclusions.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Body weight, Children, Cities, Communities, Environmental factors, Neighborhoods, Obesity

Davis LM, Kilburn MR, Schultz DJ. 2009. Reparable harm: Assessing and addressing disparities faced by boys and men of color in California. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 122 pp.

Annotation: This book summarizes a conceptual framework which describes macro, community, interpersonal, and individual level contextual factors that interact to promote or inhibit positive health outcomes. It then examines disparities in socioeconomic, physical and mental health, safety, and readiness to learn indicators that exist between boys and men of color and white boys and men in California. It calculates the odds for outcomes across a variety of indicators in these four domains to illustrate the challenges that boys and men of color are more likely to face in succeeding in life. It reviews strategies, practices, and policies for reducing these disparities and concludes with an appendix of data on additional indicators.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org $55 plus shipping and handling, or available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-8330-4561-4.

Keywords: Adolescent males, Blacks, California, Environmental influences, Health, Health status disparities, Hispanic Americans, Learning, Male children, Men, Minority groups, Safety, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Whites, Young men

Stewart EA, Simons RL. 2009. The code of the street and African-American adolescent violence. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, 20 pp. (Research in brief)

Annotation: This paper evaluates the "code of the street" theory, that seeks to explain violent behavior in African-American youth, through interviews conducted over 2 years with African-American adolescents, ages 10-15 in Iowa and Georgia to examine relationships between neighborhood and family characteristics, reported experiences with racial discrimination, expressed street code values, and self reported violent behavior in young people.

Contact: National Criminal Justice Reference Service, P.O. Box 6000, Rockville, MD 20849-6000, Telephone: (800) 851-3420 Secondary Telephone: (301)240-7760 Fax: 301-240-5830 Web Site: https://www.ncjrs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Cultural factors, Environmental influences, Families, Interviews, Racial discrimination, Violence

Chandra A, Gresenz CR, Blanchard JC, Cuellar AE, Ruder T, Chen AY, Gillen EM. 2009. Health and health care among District of Columbia youth. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 189 pp. (Technical report)

Annotation: This report assesses health and health care use among more than 100,000 children and adolescents residing in Washington, DC. The report considers both the health services delivery system and the communities in which children and adolescents live. Particular attention is devoted to changes over time in health and health care use, as well as differences by age, insurance status, and location within the city; assessing environmental factors that may contribute to or ameliorate poor health outcomes; describing community resident and provider perspectives on child and adolescent health service needs; and considering the implications of the evidence for improving the health of Washington, DC, children and adolescents.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org $46.00, plus shipping and handling; available from the website.

Keywords: District of Columbia, Access to health care, Adolescent health, Age factors, Child health, Communities, Environmental factors, Health care delivery, Health care systems, Health insurance, Trends, Uninsured persons

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2009. The Surgeon General's call to action to promote healthy homes. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 66 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the factors that influence health and safety in the home and the steps that people can take to prevent injury, disability, and disease that may result from an unhealthy housing environment. The report addresses (1) the need for healthy homes; (2) the connection between health and homes; (3) promoting healthy homes through prevention; (4) homes and health research; and (5) translating research into practical application and policy. Among the topics covered are air quality, water quality, residential chemicals, housing structure and design, elevated lead levels, structural deficiencies, mental health, access disparities, housing instability, and homelessness. A series of coordinated action steps call on individuals, families, educators, scientists, businesses, agencies, and organizations, to join in a discussion about healthy home issues; to make informed decisions; and to develop imaginative and realistic solutions that will help ensure that safe, healthy, affordable, and accessible homes are available to everyone in the United States. Related materials include materials from the launch of this program, actions for consumers, a checklist, resources, and a strategic plan.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Building codes, Environmental health, Hazards, Household safety, Housing, Public health, Public policy, Risk factors

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.