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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 21 through 40 (104 total).

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2014. Neonatal abstinence syndrome: Strategies for states and health plans. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources, from a webinar held on July 16, 2014, highlight strategies for preventing and treating neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Contents include a recording of the speaker's presentations (1 hour, 27 min., 23 sec.), the webinar agenda and speaker biographies, and related materials. Topics include recent trends in opioid abuse and NAS, with an overview of federally-led prevention efforts; the impact of rising NAS rates across the states, including implications for Medicaid and examples of state-level action; a health plan-led initiative to improve care coordination and social support for pregnant women in treatment for addiction; and the latest in NAS treatment, and an assessment of where public and private investments would be most beneficial.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Analgesic drugs, Collaboration, Drug addiction, Drug effects, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Model programs, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Newborns, Opiates, Pregnant women, Prevention programs, Public private partnerships, State MCH programs, Substance abuse treatment

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2014. Low-dose aspirin for the prevention of morbidity and mortality from preeclampsia: Preventive medication. Rockville, MD: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource provides a summary of recommendations and evidence on the use of low-dose aspirin as preventive medication after 12 weeks of gestation in women who are at high risk for preeclampsia. Additional contents include the rationale, and clinical and other considerations.

Contact: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, 540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850, Telephone: (301) 427-1584 Web Site: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Drugs, Evidence based medicine, High risk groups, Preeclampsia, Pregnant women, Preventive health services, Treatment effectiveness evaluation

Medicine Abuse Project. [2013]. "Out of Reach" toolkit. New York, NY: The Partnership at Drugfree.org,

Annotation: This toolkit for health professionals and educators includes a 25-minute documentary about medicine abuse among adolescents, which is geared toward parents and other adults. Also available are supplemental materials, including (1) an introduction, which provides an overview of the documentary and instruction on how to hold a screening, invite people, and promote the screening; (2) a discussion guide; (3) action guides, which provide tips on how to talk about adolescent medicine abuse, how to recognize symptoms or medicine abuse, and how to talk to adolescents about this topic; (4) a resource sheet; (5) a sample invitation and poster; and (6) a press release and media advisory.

Contact: Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, 352 Park Avenue South, 9th Floor, New York, NY 10010, Telephone: (855) 378-4373 Secondary Telephone: (212) 922-1560 Fax: (212) 922-1570 E-mail: webmail@drugfree.org Web Site: http://www.drugfree.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Marketing, Prescription drugs, Substance abuse, Symptoms

Fronstin P. 2013. Mental health, substance abuse, and pregnancy: Health spending following the PPACA adult-dependent mandate. Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute, 14 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief examines the impact of adult-dependent mandate (ADM) from the experience of one large national employer on total spending, average spending, out-of-pocket costs, and use of health care services. The ADM requires group health plans that offer dependent coverage to provide coverage for adult children up to age 26. Information on the types of health care that enrolled young adults use as a result of the mandate and how these young adults may differ from already-enrolled individuals is provided. Topics include the impact of the ADM, study cohorts, spending, and prescription drugs.

Contact: Employee Benefit Research Institute, 1100 13th Street NW, Suite 878, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 659-0670 Fax: (202) 775-6312 E-mail: info@ebri.org Web Site: http://www.ebri.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Costs, Health insurance, Health services, Legislation, Prescription drugs, Research, Young adults

National Education Association Health Information Network. 2013. Rx for understanding: Preventing prescription drug abuse–Educator's resource guide. Washington, DC: National Education Association Health Information Network, 104 pp.

Annotation: This standards-based, cross-curricular teaching resource is geared for students in grades 9-12. Contents include 10 lessons that lead students through an inquiry-based, technology inspired project enabling an opportunity to apply the key concepts learned about the misuse, abuse, and proper use of prescription drugs. The guide includes background information, lesson plans, a reproducible student journal, teaching resources, parent information, and national academic standards alignment charts (including National Health Education Standards and Common Core State Standards).

Contact: National Education Association Healthy Futures, 1201 16th Street, N.W., Suite 216, Washington, DC 20036-3290, Telephone: (202) 822-7570 Fax: (202) 822-7775 E-mail: info@neahealthyfutures.org Web Site: http://www.neahhealthyfutures.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Injury prevention, Prescription drugs, Safety, School health education, Secondary schools, Substance abuse prevention, Teaching

National Education Association Health Information Network. [2012]. Rx for understanding: Be smart about prescription drugs–Educator's resource guide. Washington, DC: National Education Association Health Information Network, 120 pp.

Annotation: This standards-based, cross-curricular teaching resource is geared for students in grades 5-8. Contents include five sequenced lessons for grades 5-6 and five sequenced lessons for grades 7-8. Each set of lessons acts as a mini-unit, focusing on the same five lesson themes: relating the issue of prescription drug safety to overall health, understanding proper use, understanding misuse, understanding abuse, and conducting an application-based culminating project. The guide includes background information, lesson plans, reproducible student activity sheets, parent information, and national academic standards alignment charts (including National Health Education Standards and Common Core State Standards).

Contact: National Education Association Healthy Futures, 1201 16th Street, N.W., Suite 216, Washington, DC 20036-3290, Telephone: (202) 822-7570 Fax: (202) 822-7775 E-mail: info@neahealthyfutures.org Web Site: http://www.neahhealthyfutures.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Injury prevention, Middle schools, Prescription drugs, Safety, School health education, Substance abuse prevention, Teaching

Pringle BA, Colpe LJ, Blumberg SJ, Avila RM, Kogan MD. 2012. Diagnostic history and treatment of school-aged children with autism spectrum disorder and special health care needs. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 7 pp. (NCHS data brief no. 97)

Annotation: This data brief provides information on diagnosis and treatment of school-age children and adolescents (ages 6-16) with special health care needs (CSHCN) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Topic include age of diagnosis, types of health professionals that identify CSHCN as having ASD, and health services and medications used by CSHCN with ASD.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Prescription drugs, Adolescents with special health care needs, Autism, Children with special health care needs, Diagnosis, Health services, Statistical data, Treatments

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2012. Children's mental health: Concerns remain about appropriate services for children in Medicaid and foster care. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 54 pp.

Annotation: This report, which focuses on child mental health services for children enrolled in Medicaid and in foster care, examines (1) the use of psychotropic medications and other mental health services for children enrolled in Medicaid nationwide, as well as other related Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services initiatives; (2) Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) information on the use of psychotropic medications and other mental health services for children in foster care nationwide, and related DHHS initiatives; and (3) the amount that DHHS has invested in research on children's mental health.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Costs, Foster care, Initiatives, Medicaid, Mental health, Mental health services, Prescription drugs, Research

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. 2012. Preconception health. Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, 1 video (4 min., 30 sec).

Annotation: This videorecording provides information about preconception health. It discusses birth control, avoiding smoking and illegal drugs, abstaining from alcohol consumption during pregnancy, vaccinations, receiving regular checkups, taking multivitamins and folic acid, nutrition, and physical activity. Vignettes with women at different stages in their life are presented.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption, Birth control, Folic acid, Illicit drugs, Immunizations, Multimedia, Nutrition, Physical activity, Preconception care, Prenatal care, Prevention, Smoking, Vitamin supplements, Women's health

QEV Analytics. 2011. The importance of family dinners. New York, NY: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 19 pp. (No. 7)

Annotation: This report examines the relationship between family dinners and specific characteristics that increase or diminish the likelihood that an adolescent will smoke, drink, or use illicit drugs. The following topics are discussed: (1) family dinners and adolescent substance-abuse risk, (2) family dinners and stress, boredom, and academic performance, (3) family dinners and smoking, drinking, and using illicit drugs.

Contact: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 633 Third Avenue, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 841-5200 Fax: (212) 956-8020 Web Site: http://www.casacolumbia.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Alcohol consumption, Families, Illicit drugs, Smoking, Stress, Substance abuse

Institute of Medicine. 2011. Informing the future: Critical issues in health. (6th ed.). Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 196 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information about the work of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in selected, major areas in recent years. The main sections illustrate work that IOM committees have done in several topic areas, including quality of care, pharmaceuticals, children and adolescents, public health, active-duty military and veterans, global health, health research, and clinical medicine. Following is a description of IOM's convening and collaborative activities -- those cases in which IOM has brought people together to share ideas and discuss possible solutions. The last section provides a comprehensive bibliography of IOM reports published since 2007.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website after registration. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-21533-6.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, International health, Military, Prescription drugs, Public health, Research

Duckworth K, Gruttadaro D, Markey D. 2010. What families should know about adolescent depression (2nd ed.). Arlington, VA: National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, 36 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information about adolescent depression and treatment options. It introduces adolescent depression and its causes and symptoms and getting an accurate diagnosis. It then discusses treatment, including talk therapy and medications; risks and benefits of antidepressants, as well as family history and treatment. Risk of suicide is also presented, creating good monitoring systems and safety plans, treatment research, and how to be an effective advocate for an adolescent with depression. The guide concludes with resources.

Contact: National Alliance on Mental Illness, 3803 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 100, Arlington, VA 22203, Telephone: (703) 524-7600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 950-6264 Fax: (703) 524-9094 E-mail: info@nami.org Web Site: http://www.nami.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advocacy, Antidepressant drugs, Cognitive therapy, Consumer education materials, Depression, Families, Monitoring, Parents, Safety, Treatment

Bernstein J, Chollet D, Peterson S. 2010. How does insurance coverage improve health outcomes?. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 5 pp. (Reforming health care: Issue brief, April 2010, no. 1)

Annotation: This brief looks at how insurance improves health outcomes by helping people obtain preventive and screening services, prescription drug benefits, and mental health and other services, as well as by improving continuity of care. Topics include health outcomes of the insured vs. the uninsured, the effects of lack of insurance, the importance of coverage features, and considerations for policymakers. The brief is the first in a series that highlights issues related to health care reform that policymakers may want to consider as they implement the federal health reform law.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com

Keywords: Costs, Health care reform, Health insurance, Health services, Mental health, Prescription drugs, Prevention, Public policy, Screening, Uninsured persons

Soni A. 2009. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children (5-17): Use and expenditures, 2007. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5 pp. (MEPS statistical brief, no. 276)

Annotation: This statistical brief presents estimates on expenditures for and use of ambulatory care and prescribed medications to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder among children ages 5-17 in the U.S. civilian population who have not been institutionalized. The estimates are based on the Household Component of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS-HC) –- a nationally-representative longitudinal survey of families and individuals, their medical providers, and employers across the United States. Average annual estimates are shown by type of service and source of payment.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Attention deficit disorder, Child mental health, Drugs, Expenditures, Health services, Longitudinal studies, National surveys, Primary care, Statistics

Hughes D, Howell E, Trenholm C, Hill I, Dubay L. 2008. Three independent evaluations of Healthy Kids programs find dramatic gains in children's dental health care. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 5 pp. (In brief, number 2)

Annotation: This brief presents highlights from independent evaluations of the Healthy Kids programs in three California counties—Los Angeles, San Mateo, and Santa Clara. These programs provide children from families with low incomes—but who are ineligible for California's two major state insurance programs—with comprehensive health-insurance coverage, including a broad range of medical, dental, and vision care; prescription drugs; and mental health services. The brief describes some of the positive impacts that Healthy Kids has had on children's access to and use of oral health services.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, California, Child health, Children, Families, Low income groups, Mental health, Oral health, Prescription drugs, State health insurance programs

Vanchieri C, Butler AS, Knutsen A. 2008. Addressing barriers to pediatric drug development: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 52 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes presentations and discussions from the Institutes of Medicine workshop titled Addressing the Barriers to Pediatric Drug Development, held on June 13, 2006. The purpose of the workshop was to identify barriers to the development and testing of drugs for pediatric populations, as well as to examine ways in which the system can be improved to facilitate better treatments for children. Topics include the regulatory framework, models for enhancing pediatric drug development, and challenges and opportunities.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-10743-1.

Keywords: Child health, Development, Infant health, Prescription drugs, Regulations, Research

Morrison J, Borchelt G. 2007. Don't take "no" for an answer: A guide to pharmacy refusal laws, policies, ad practices. [Upd ed.]. Washington, DC: National Women's Law Center, 17 pp.

Annotation: This guide explores laws, regulations, and other authorities that govern the dispensation of prescription medications, with a focus on contraceptives, and provides resources to help advocates find governing and supporting authority to fight against religious, moral, or personal refusals to fill lawful prescriptions. Part one provides an overview of state laws, regulations, policies, and administrative decisions directly addressing pharmacy refusals. Part two discusses other support against refusals in state law and regulation. Part three summarizes other national and state policy statements and guidance, such as those from national organizations. Part four outlines pharmacy policies on refusals, transfers, and stocking. Part five highlights selected cases brought by pharmacists claiming a right to refuse. Conclusions are offered along with extensive references.

Contact: National Women's Law Center, 11 Dupont Circle. N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 588-5180 Fax: (202) 588-5185 E-mail: info@nwlc.org Web Site: http://www.nwlc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraceptives, Emergency contraception, Patient rights, Pharmacies, Prescription drugs, Professional ethics, Regulations, Right to refuse treatment, Right to treatment, Treatment refusal

National Women's Law Center. 2007. Pharmacy refusals 101. Washington, DC: National Women's Law Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet outlines issues over refusals of pharmacies to fill prescriptions for contraceptives, particularly emergency contraceptives. Topics include (1) prescription contraception as basic health care for women, (2) increases in refusals to dispense contraception, (3) laws governing the practice of pharmacy, (4) legislative and administrative responses to pharmacist refusals, (5) public opinion, and (6) how to respond to a pharmacist's refusal.

Contact: National Women's Law Center, 11 Dupont Circle. N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 588-5180 Fax: (202) 588-5185 E-mail: info@nwlc.org Web Site: http://www.nwlc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraceptives, Emergency contraception, Patient rights, Pharmacies, Prescription drugs, Professional ethics, Right to refuse treatment, Right to treatment

National Health Law Program. 2007. Over the counter or out of reach?: A report on evolving state Medicaid policies for covering emergency contraception. [Los Angeles, CA]: National Health Law Program, 36 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is geared toward advocates working to ensure access to emergency contraception (EC) for all women, identifies the nature and extent of each state's current written policies affecting Medicaid coverage of Plan B EC. The report is intended to be used in conjunction with a forthcoming publication from the National Institute for Reproductive Health, which will provide additional information about state Medicaid coverage of over-the-counter EC. The report discusses Medicaid drug coverage rules, the Medicaid/EC interplay, a state Medicaid chart explanation, and a list of state resources for Plan B Medicaid coverage by state.

Contact: National Health Law Program, 3701 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 750, Los Angeles, CA 90010, Telephone: (310) 204-6010 Fax: (213) 386-0774 E-mail: nhelp@healthlaw.org Web Site: http://www.healthlaw.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Advocacy, Emergency contraception, Medicaid, Prescription drugs, Public policy, Reproductive health, State programs

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. 2007. Expert Panel Report 3: Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma. Bethesda, MD: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 362 pp.

Annotation: This report, developed by an expert panel commissioned by the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program, presents recommendations for the diagnosis and management of asthma that will help clinicians and consumers make appropriate decisions about asthma care. The report is divided into the following main sections: (1) introduction, (2) definition, pathophysiology, and pathogenesis of asthma, and natural history of asthma, (3) the four components of asthma management (measures of assessment and monitoring, education for a partnership in asthma care, control of environmental factors and comorbid conditions, and medications), (4) managing asthma long-term, and (5) managing exacerbations of asthma. Resources for more information and references are included.

Contact: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Information Center, P.O. Box 30105, Bethesda, MD 20824-0105, Telephone: (301) 592-8573 Secondary Telephone: (240) 629-3255 Fax: (301) 592-8563 E-mail: NHLBIinfo@nhlbi.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/infoctr/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Diagnosis, Education, Environmental exposure, Guidelines, Health care, Prescription drugs, Prevention, Treatment

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.