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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 21 through 40 (360 total).

Jordan E, Szrom J, Colvard J, Cooper H, DeVooght K. 2013. Changing the course for infants and toddlers: A survey of state child welfare policies and initiatives. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends; Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 65 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a national survey of states and the District of Columbia about policies and practices that guide child welfare agencies' work in addressing the needs of maltreated infants and toddlers. It provides information about the survey; summarizes results related to assessment and services, infants and toddlers in foster care and their families (including post-permanency care for this population); training in early childhood development and developmentally appropriate practice; and data collection and analysis. An executive summary, an index of state policies and practices to support the development of young children, and a brief document about understanding and meeting the needs of birth parents are also available.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child welfare, Foster care, Infants, Maltreated children, National surveys, Needs assessment, State surveys, Training, Young children

Child Welfare League of America. 2013. National blueprint for excellence in child welfare: Standards of excellence—Raising the bar for children, families, and communities. Washington, DC: Child Welfare League of America, 142 pp.

Annotation: This blueprint presents a vision for the future of child welfare that all children will grow up safely in loving families and supportive communities. The blueprint is intended to be a catalyst for change and also to serve as the basis for updating and creating Child Welfare League of America (CWLA) program-specific standards of excellence. The blueprint discusses CWLA vision and values and presents eight core principles and standards on the following topics: rights of children; shared responsibility and leadership; engagement/participation; supports and services; quality improvement; work force; race, ethnicity, and culture; and funding and resources.

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org $24.95 for non-members, $19.95 for members; also available as .pdf , $11.95 for non-members, . Document Number: ISBN 978-1-58760-152-1.

Keywords: Child welfare, Children, Children's rights, Communities, Cultural factors, Ethnic factors, Families, Family support services, Financing, Leadership, Programs, Racial factors, Safety, Standards

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. Supporting your LGBTQ youth: A guide for foster parents. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 11 pp. (Factsheet for families)

Annotation: This fact sheet for families provides information about how foster parents can support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. The fact sheet provides background information about LGBTQ youth and discusses LGBTQ youth and the child welfare system, creating a welcoming home for youth, and supporting youth in the community.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Bullying, Child welfare agencies, Community programs, Foster children, Foster parents, Homosexuality, Parent support services, Prevention, Schools, Social services, Youth, Youth development

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. What is child welfare? A guide for health-care professionals. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 4 pp. (Factsheet )

Annotation: This fact sheet presents information about child welfare. The fact sheets describes what child welfare agencies typically do. It also discusses how health professionals can help child welfare workers collaborate to support families and prevent child abuse and neglect, identify and support suspected child abuse and neglect, know the laws about confidentiality and privacy, use trauma-informed practices, and serve as resources for child welfare agencies and families. Also discussed is how how child welfare workers can help health professionals by ensuring that health professionals have what they need to treat children, helping children and families access health care services, and coordinating the health care needs of adolescents aging out of foster care. Resources for more information are included.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child welfare agencies, Collaboration, Family support services, Foster care, Health services, Legislation, Prevention, Service coordination

Martinez M, Rider F, Cayce N, Forsell S, Poirier J, Hunt S, Crawford G, Sawyer J. 2013. A guide for father involvement in systems of care. Washington, DC: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, 50 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information about the importance of fathers in the lives of their children and identifies potential consequences of non-involvement. The guide also offers strategies for systems and families to help fathers become more involved. Topics include statistics about the presence or absence of fathers in their children's lives, why children need fathers to be actively involved, ways for systems of care to best support fathers' involvement in individual- and family-service plans, how systems of care can involve fathers in all dimensions of development, different cultural perspectives on fatherhood, the role of young fathers, grandfather involvement, and the role of fathers in the child welfare system.

Contact: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 403-6827 Fax: (202) 403-5007 E-mail: tapartnership@air.org Web Site: http://www.tapartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent fathers, Child development, Child welfare agencies, Cultural factors, Families, Father child relations, Fathers, Grandparents, Parenting skills, Service delivery systems

Maher E, Zulliger K, Marcynyszyn L, Wilson D, Carroll CL, Calpin. 2013. Making the case for early childhood intervention in child welfare: A research and practice brief. Seattle, WA: Casey Family Programs, 17 pp.

Annotation: This research and practice brief outlines why targeted intervention for infants and young children in child welfare are important and describes the types of intervention programs currently available and associated evaluation studies in the field, setting the stage for a forthcoming more detailed look at intervention strategies and outcomes. The brief discusses infants and young children in child welfare; return on investment for interventions in this population; wise investments to improve child outcomes; and policies, practice, and research opportunities.

Contact: Casey Family Programs, 2001 Eighth Avenue, Suite 2700, Seattle, WA 98121, Telephone: (206) 282-7300 Fax: (202) 282-3555 E-mail: http://www.casey.org/ContactUs/EmailUs/?email=pbagnpghf@pnfrl.bet&officename=Casey%20Family%20%20Programs Web Site: http://www.casey.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Costs, Early intervention, Foster care, Foster children, Infants, Public policy, Research, Young children

Zero to Three. 2013. State child welfare policies and practices that support infants and toddlers. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 5 items.

Annotation: This webinar presents findings from a 2013 survey of state child welfare agencies about the policies and practices that guide the agencies' work in addressing the needs of infants and toddlers who have been maltreated. It demonstrates how three states' policies and practices reflect a developmental approach to child welfare services for young children. The website includes links the audio presentation, the slides, and the survey upon which the webinar is based. A link to the print copy of the survey report is also provided.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development services, Child welfare agencies, Maltreated children, National surveys, Policy, Research, Young children

Briar-Lawson K, McCarthy M, Dickerson N, eds. 2013. The Children's Bureau: Shaping a century of child welfare practices, programs, and policies. Washington, DC: National Association of Social Workers, 342 pp.

Annotation: This book outlines the 100-year history of the Children's Bureau and highlights the ways it has influenced modern-day child welfare practices. Topics include lessons learned, family driven and community-based systems of care, addressing poverty as a child welfare strategy, youth and family engagement, successful transition to adulthood for foster youth, child protection, child maltreatment, social work, tribal and urban Indian child welfare, work force, leadership development, and envisioning the future.

Contact: National Association of Social Workers, 750 First Street, N.E., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20002-4241, Telephone: (202) 408-8600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 742-4089 Fax: E-mail: membership@naswdc.org Web Site: http://www.socialworkers.org $55.99, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-087101-446-7.

Keywords: American Indians, Federal agencies, Child abuse, Child advocacy, Child welfare, Children, Children's Bureau, Families, Foster care, History, Maltreated children, Poverty, Social work, Socioeconomic factors, Transitions, Work force

Lieberman A, Nelson K, eds. 2013. Women and children first: The contribution of the Children's Bureau to social work education. Alexandria, VA: Council on Social Work Education, 249 pp.

Annotation: This book focuses on the relationship between the Children’s Bureau and the social work community, a constant since the founding of the Bureau in 1912. It traces the interaction of the Children's Bureau with social work education and practice through scope, policy, and leadership changes, as well as collaboration between the Bureau and schools of social work to develop a dynamic training and technical assistance infrastructure throughout the United States.

Contact: Council on Social Work Education, 1701 Duke Street, Suite 200, Alexandria, VA 22314-3457, Telephone: (703) 683-8080 Fax: (703) 683-8099 E-mail: info@cswe.org Web Site: http://www.cswe.org $46.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-087293-150-3.

Keywords: Child welfare, Children, Children's Bureau, Families, Federal agencies, History, Social work, Work force

Calculating the Costs of Child Welfare Services Workgroup. 2013. Cost analysis in program evaluation: A guide for child welfare researchers and service providers. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 22 pp.

Annotation: This guide offers a framework for integrating cost analysis into program evaluations, presents key principles and concepts in cost analysis, provides guidance for defining the scope and purpose of a cost analysis and determining the information needed to conduct it, and explains steps in conducting a cost analysis. It provides illustrations of cost analysis of an intact family services program and of a home visiting program. Companion videos are also available.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Costs, Evaluation, Home visiting, MCH programs, Manuals, Program evaluation

Fordham Interdisciplinary Parent Representation Project. [2012]. Guide to working with young parents in out of home care. New York, NY: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 50 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information and guidance for working with pregnant and parenting youth, helping them as they develop both as individuals and as parents through positive casework interactions. The guide encourages a strengths-based approach to ensure the safety of both young parents and their children. It offers suggestions for engaging young parents in conferencing and supportive services while highlighting the importance of maintaining a young parent’s right to privacy and autonomy, and emphasize comprehensive planning for pregnant young people to promote well being, to minimize the need for court intervention, to ensure placement stability and to help young families move more quickly toward permanency. The guide is designed to be used primarily by provider agency case planners, but may also be useful to child protective staff, Family Services Unit staff, parent advocates, attorneys and others who work with this vulnerable population. Topics in planning and services for young parents in out of home care include: legal issues, father participation, collaborative planning and permanency, preventive services, child safety conferences, court intervention, pregnancy-related services, medical home visiting programs, parenting supports, counseling and mental health services, education, child care, and preparing a young parent for leaving foster care. Appendices provide resources for services in adolescent reproductive health, breastfeeding, the WIC program, support services and assistance, teen father support, mentoring and mental health, housing support, legal information, education, hoe visiting, and parenting education programs. Tips sheets are provided on mandatory reporting, early care and education, public housing, and transitional Medicaid.

Contact: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 150 William Street, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 341-0900 Secondary Telephone: (877) KIDSNYC E-mail: http://nyc.gov/html/mail/html/mailacs.html Web Site: http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Child welfare, Family support services, Foster care, New York, Out of home care, Parent education, Social services, State initiatives, Youth in transition programs

U.S. Children's Bureau. [2012]. The Children's Bureau legacy: Ensuring the right to childhood. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Children's Bureau, 233 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a history of the Children's Bureau from its inception in 1912 to 2012. The document describes the origins of the bureau and follows it through the ensuing century. Topics include the birth of the bureau, saving infants and restoring childhood (1912-1929), the Great Depression and social security (1930-1939), wartime and recovery (1940-1956), a growing government shrinks the bureau (1957-1973), sharpening the focus on child welfare (1974-1992), and partnering with families and working to improve outcomes (1993-2012).

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 9780160917257.

Keywords: Child advocacy, Child health, Child welfare, Children's Bureau, Federal agencies, History

Allen KD, Pires SA, Mahadevan R. 2012. Improving outcomes for children in child welfare: A Medicaid managed care toolkit. [Hamilton, NJ]: Center for Health Care Strategies, 49 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit describes the efforts of the nine Medicaid managed care organizations (MCOs) that participated in Improving Outcomes for Children Involved in Child Welfare: A CHCS Quality Improvement Collaborative, designed by the Center for Health Care Strategies (CHCS) and funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The toolkit includes a project overview, an overview and description of the impact of the MCOs' initiatives, and discussions of care coordination and lessons learned.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child health, Child welfare, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Collaboration, Ethnic factors, Foster care, Foster children, High risk children, Initiatives, Low income groups, Medicaid managed care, Mental health, Programs, Racial factors

U.S. Children's Bureau. 2012. Children's Bureau centennial . Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau,

Annotation: This web site celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Children's Bureau, describing its history of addressing issues affecting children and families and setting the stage for the next century. Contents include a timeline of the Children's Bureau's history, numerous documents, videos and audio recordings, links, webinars, photographs, books and articles, as well as conferences and meetings, and logos and widgets.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child health, Child welfare, Children's Bureau, Families, History

U.S. Children's Bureau. 2012. The story of the Children's Bureau. [Washington, DC]: Administration for Children and Families, 39 pp.

Annotation: This book covers the 100-year history of the U.S. Children's Bureau dedicated to the welfare of the nation's children. Topics include involvement in issues such as infant mortality, dependent children, child labor hours and conditions, child abuse and neglect prevention, foster care, and adoption services. Contents include collaboration, assistance to states and tribes, research and data, getting the word out, and leadership. A website also presents the Children's Bureau history. A version of the printed history is also available in Spanish at https://cb100.acf.hhs.gov/sites/all/themes/danland/danblog/files/Story_of_CB_Spanish.pdf.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child abuse, Child labor, Child neglect, Child welfare, Children, Federal agencies, Foster care, History, Infant mortality, Infants, Spanish language materials, U. S. Children's Bureau, Welfare reform, Welfare services

U.S. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families . 2012. Promoting social and emotional well-being for children and youth receiving child welfare services. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , 21 pp.

Annotation: This information memorandum for state, tribal, and territorial agencies administering or supervising the administration of Titles IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act, Indian Tribes and Indian Tribal Organizations, seeks to promote social and emotional well-bring for children and adolescents who have experienced maltreatment and are receiving child welfare services. The memorandum includes an overview of the issue and a discussion of the Administration on Children, Youth and Families' well-being framework, emerging evidence on the impact of maltreatment, requirements and policy opportunities, current state and county investments, screening and functional assessment, effective interventions, and maximizing resources to achieve better results.

Contact: U.S. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: Secondary Telephone: Fax: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/acyf Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent mental health, American Indians, Child development, Child maltreatment, Child mental health, Child welfare, Child welfare agencies, Intervention, Legislation, Public policy, Screening, Social service agencies, State agencies

Children's Defense Fund. 2012. The state of America's children handbook. Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report presents key data on the health and well being of children across the United States. It provides information and statistics in areas such as child nutrition, poverty, family income, housing, health status, education, and juvenile justice, and presents tables that compare how children are faring in each state. Included are statistics based on the age, race, and ethnicity of children. Comparisons between the state of children in America and those in other industrialized nations are also provided. The report is intended to help inform and enable those who care about children to effectively stand up and advocate for them.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Child health, Child nutrition, Child welfare, Child welfare, Data, Early childhood development, Education, Family characteristics, Gun violence, High risk groups, Population surveillance, Poverty, Statistics

New York City Administration for Children's Services. 2012. ABCs of working with young parents in out of home care: Expectations, responsibilities and resources. New York, NY: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document is a source of information and guidance for case planners in New York City in their work with parenting youth and youth planning for the arrival of their baby in foster care, and in developing appropriate service plans for these youth. It discusses roles for agency case planners in referring both expecting mothers and fathers of health and support systems, discussing the role of resource parents for minors who are expecting, securing a stable placement for expecting youth before baby arrives, as well as developing and executing permanency plans for young parents in out-of-home care. Additional information is provided on health care testing and decision-making, legal aspects of pregnancy and parenting, and understanding funding for baby's essential needs. A practice guide summary is included along with resources for community based services, housing and child care, child welfare services, medical mentoring for pregnant and parenting youth, and prevention services.

Contact: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 150 William Street, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 341-0900 Secondary Telephone: (877) KIDSNYC E-mail: http://nyc.gov/html/mail/html/mailacs.html Web Site: http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Child welfare, Family support services, Foster care, New York, Out of home care, Parent education, Social services, State initiatives, Youth in transition programs

Murphey D. 2012. The Child Trends DataBank: A resource for indicators of child well-being . Washington, DC: Child Trends, 3 pp.

Annotation: This report presents information from a webinar presented by Child Trends on July 12, 2012, that focused on the Child Trends DataBank, which is a resource for indicators of child well-being. The report discusses Child Trends and offers information about the DataBank, ways to use it, and information it includes.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Child development, Child health, Child welfare, Children, Early childhood development, Education, Families, Fatherhood, Marriage, Mental health, Parenting skills, Poverty, Program, Programs, Public policy, Resource materials, Statistical data, Trends

Casanueva C, Dozier M, Tueller S, Jones Harden B, Dolan M, Smith K. 2012. Instability and early life changes among children in the child welfare system: Research brief. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 8 pp. (National survey of child and adolescent well-being: no. 18)

Annotation: This research brief describes the experience of instability and early life changes among children in the child welfare system, including children who are placed out of home and children who remain in-home with their families following an investigation. Using data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (a national longitudinal study of the well-being of 5, 500 children 14 ears old or younger who were the subjects of child protective services investigations starting in1999), the brief examines changes in caregiving and household arrangements and risk factors associated with maltreatment and instability. Included are statistics comparing the age of the children, the number of caregiver/house changes they have experienced, and the likelihood of adverse outcomes.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Data, High risk children, Life course, National surveys, Risk factors, Statistics

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.