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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 21 through 40 (2,013 total).

Larsen,B. n.d.. Symbolic logic: A promising decision making tool. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 25 pp. (Quantods series no.: 1-8 (5))

Larsen B. n.d.. An expanded model of registrant flow in comprehensive health care projects. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 16 pp. (Quantods series no.: 1-9 (4))

Annotation: This paper expands the model for the flow of registrants in a Children and Youth Program project as presented in a previous paper by classifying the group of registrants who have not yet reached health supervision into categories of those who are registered only and those who have already progressed to health assessment or treatment. This paper is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Federal MCH programs

Larsen B. n.d.. An introduction to factor analysis. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 31 pp. (Quantods series no.: 1-9 (7))

Larsen B, Larsen W. n.d.. Project performance: An analysis by ranks. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 29 pp. (Quantods series no.: 2-10 (9))

Annotation: This paper presents a method of comparative composite scoring of project performance for use in the Children and Youth Program. Seven proxy indicators measuring project performance in health care delivery for comprehensive health care projects are used. By means of a transformation procedure, individual performance measures are converted into a single score measuring composite project performance. This paper is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Evaluation methods, Federal MCH programs, Measures, Statistical analysis

Larsen B, Larsen W. n.d.. Ranking of reporting performance among Children and Youth Projects. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 21 pp. (Quantods series no.: 2-11 (10))

Annotation: This paper is an analysis focusing on the completeness, consistency, and timeliness of reports submitted for Children and Youth Program grant continuation. This is intended as an administrative tool for identification of areas where action can be most effectively applied toward replanning, reorganizing, reallocation of resources, redirection, and modified supervision of ongoing services. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Evaluation methods, Federal MCH programs, Measures, Reports, Statistical analysis

Larsen B. n.d.. Factor analysis and index construction in health services research. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 15 pp. (Quantods series no.: 2-11 (11))

Annotation: This paper introduces the concept of factor analysis and index construction to address the need for a common scientific language in the social sciences, particularly if interdisciplinary research is to be effective. The contents address factor analysis, factor loadings, factor scores, and a numerical example. This paper is part of the documentation and assessment of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Federal MCH programs, Statistical analysis

Larsen B, Larsen W. n.d.. A rank order method for assessing the Children and Youth Program. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 15 pp. (Quantods series no.: 2-11 (12))

Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management. n.d.. Child Health and Illness Profile: Adolescent Edition—[Program description packet]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University, Department of Health Policy and Management, 44 pp.

Annotation: This information packet describes an integrated framework for a comprehensive self-report measure of adolescent health appropriate for 11 to 17 year olds who can read English on at least a fifth grade level. The six domains of health, and subdomains that make up each, are briefly described. The other enclosure provides sample questions from each of the 20 subdomains and from the demographics section. Copies of four articles about this program are also included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management, 624 North Broadway, Suite 493, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 955-3625 Contact Phone: (410) 955-9725 Fax: (410) 614-9152 Contact E-mail: ariley@jhsph.edu Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/HPM Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Measures, Questionnaires, Self evaluation

Larsen B. n.d.. Determinants of migration in low income areas. Minneapolis, MN: [School of Public Health, University of Minnesota], Systems Development Project, 10 pp. (Quantods series no.: 1-9 (6))

Annotation: This paper discusses potential motivations for itnernal migration. The results presented in this paper apply to a group of 20 low income areas, specifically to the geographical target areas associated with a sample of 20 Children and Youth program comprehensive health care services delivery projects. The analysis is based on data extracted from the Quarterly Summary Reports for this program. This paper is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Federal MCH programs, Statistical analysis

University of Maryland-Baltimore, Center for Social Work Education in Maternal and Child Health. n.d.. Ethnicity and maternal and child health care. Baltimore, MD: University of Maryland-Baltimore, Center for Social Work Education in Maternal and Child Health, ca. 75 pp.

Annotation: This unpublished document contains a set of 4 teaching modules: (1) Ethnicity and Healthy Birth Outcomes; (2) Ethnicity and Genetic Disease; (3) Culture and AIDS Prevention in Adolescents; and (4) Using the Internet in Maternal and Child Health. Each of the modules contains lesson objectives; a suggested reading list followed by a section of summaries; and suggested assignments and class presentations geared towards the objectives discussed at the beginning of each module. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Maryland School of Social Work, Center for Maternal and Child Health Social Work Education, 525 West Redwood Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, Telephone: (410) 706-7533 Fax: (410) 706-6046 Web Site: http://cmchswe.umaryland.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Disease prevention, Educational materials, Ethnic factors, Internet, MCH training, Maternal health

Newacheck P. n.d.. Improving Health Insurance Coverage for Adolescents: Analysis, Dissemination, and Technical Assistance [Final report]. San Francisco, CA: Institute for Health Policy Studies, 12 pp.

Annotation: The goals of this project were to: (1) Heighten awareness of adolescent health insurance problems and potential solutions among policymakers, health care professionals, educators, business groups, and parents; (2) strengthen State-level capacity to plan and implement strategies for improving financing of health services for adolescents; and (3) update and expand our knowledge base concerning the financing of health services for adolescents. Activities included conducting workshops, providing technical assistance, and publishing reports and educational materials. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB94-161536.

Keywords: Adolescents, Data Collection, Education of Health Professionals, Financing Health Care for Adolescents, Health Insurance, Medicaid, Minorities

Harrison P. n.d.. Comprehensive Health Services System for Youth Offenders: [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 34 pp.

Annotation: This 3-year demonstration project sought to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of health services for adolescents detained or housed in institutional settings within the State Juvenile Service Agency (JSA). The overall purpose was to establish a link between the state Title V agency and the Juvenile Services Agency to assist the JSA to (1) determine the particular characteristics, health needs, and concerns of their adolescent population and (2) develop and manage appropriate comprehensive health systems as a model for the nation. The project designed a health information system (consisting of a personal computer using D-Base III plus software) to monitor the health status of the population and a training handbook for Juvenile Justice personnel. Information obtained regarding health status of the population was used in designing training materials for juvenile justice staff. Further training needs were identified by conducting an in-depth needs assessment and analysis. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB91-242008.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Adolescents, Continuing Education, High risk adolescents, Juvenile Delinquents, Nurses

Pendley. n.d.. Native American Adolescent Injury Prevention Project: [Final report]. Santa Fe, NM: New Mexico Health and Environment Department (HED), 12 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to reduce the rate of unintentional injuries and deaths among Native American adolescents in New Mexico and the Southwest. Specific goals were to: (1) Improve existing data bases on deaths and disabilities from unintentional injuries among Native American teens; (2) improve culturally relevant injury prevention materials and methodologies for these teens; (3) improve the knowledge, attitudes, and prevention practices regarding unintentional injuries among this population; (4) increase the availability of injury prevention materials and methodologies in Native American junior and senior high schools; and (5) increase the quality and quantity of injury prevention services provided to these teens by health care and tribal agencies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-199206.

Keywords: Southwestern United States, Adolescents, American Indians, Data Bases, Indian Health Service (IHS), Information Clearinghouses, Injuries, Injury Prevention, Mortality

Carter M. n.d.. Continuing Nursing Education: Adolescents: [Final report]. Kansas City, KS: University of Kansas School of Nursing, 12 pp.

Annotation: This grant sponsored a symposium to improve adolescent approaches to health care through providing health professionals with new, innovative, and practical approaches to adolescent health care delivery. Issues addressed were: reaching the adolescent client; the application of physiological, cognitive, emotional, social, and behavioral theories to adolescent health care; and specific adolescent problems such as adolescent pregnancy and parenting, drug abuse, suicide, and body image; and sexuality in the disabled adolescent. Program emphasis was on the team and multi-disciplinary approach to effective adolescent health care delivery. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196731.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Nurses Physicians Social Workers, Professional education

Simmons E. n.d.. Youth in Transition—The Alabama Experience: [Final report]. Montgomery, AL: Alabama Department of Education, 32 pp.

Annotation: This project focused on developing a systematic approach to integrate medical, vocational, educational, psychosocial, and developmental services for adolescents with physical disabilities and/or chronic illness who are at risk in their transition to maturity. Project objectives were to (1) create an administrative structure at the State level and in two pilot sites for provision of an integrated continuum of health and education services; (2) enable service providers, through training and collaboration, to coordinate service planning for the target population; (3) enable the adolescent and family, through counseling and training, to function as their own "case manager"; and (4) monitor and evaluate the model to determine the feasibility for replication in Alabama and/or other states. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-147031.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Advocacy, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Community-Based Health Care, Coordination of Health Care, Data Bases, Interdisciplinary Teams, Rural Population, Urban Population

Hostler S. n.d.. Family Autonomy Project [Final report]. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia, 50 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to ensure the successful transition to adulthood of adolescents with physical disabilities or chronic illnesses by means of interventions with families, the health care team, and the adolescents themselves. The project sought to encourage the involvement of families in planning for the health care of their children, to modify staff behaviors and institutional practices to promote family autonomy, and to broaden treatment goals so that they included health maintenance and future planning for adolescents with special needs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196962.

Keywords: ., Adolescents with special health care needs, Advocacy, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Families, Family-Centered Health Care Transition, Support Groups

Langley M. n.d.. Continuum's Minority Connection Project [Final report]. Atlanta, GA: CONTINUUM Alliance for Healthy Mothers and Children, 32 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to reduce postneonatal mortality rates associated with inadequate parenting skills and poor utilization of prenatal and child health care services. Activities included establishment of a resource mothers program in which church women were trained to assist pregnant women in negotiating the health care and social services systems, and implementation of a teen peer counselor program. The project also established self-sustaining local coalitions to monitor and address problems that contribute to poor pregnancy outcomes. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196889.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Adolescents, Blacks, Clergy, Community-Based Health Services, High risk groups, High risk pregnancy, Infant Mortality, Low income groups, Postneonatal Mortality, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Religious organizations, Rural Populations

Miller S. n.d.. New Horizons in School Health [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: University of Maryland at Baltimore, 35 pp.

Annotation: The project provided training experiences to enable health professionals in schools to work together and with school colleagues to provide developmentally appropriate, comprehensive health care. This enhanced the healthy development and academic success of school children. Additionally, the project providef training ot enable school health professionals to serve as effective preceptors for future student professionals. Twenty Maryland schools with school-based health programs established interdisciplinary teams consisting of health and education professionals. Each school-based team identified a health need in its school and designed, implemented, and evaluated a team project. Process evaluation was implemented following key activities. Outcome evaluation focused on outcomes related to specific project objectives. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121974.

Keywords: Adolescents, Interdisciplinary Approach, Professional Education in Adolescent Health, School Health Programs, State Staff Development

Keith J. n.d.. Family-Focused Strategy for Reducing Premature and Unprotected Sexual Activity Among Minority Youth in School-Based Health Clinics [Final report]. Dallas, TX: Dallas County Hospital District, 26 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate effective intervention strategies for the 10–15 year age group that can be carried out within a school-based comprehensive health care system to reduce the occurrence of premature and unprotected sexual intercourse in adolescents. More than 300 10-year-old children and their parents enrolled to receive annual health maintenance evaluations and a series of activities to enhance parent-child communication, parental knowledge of adolescent social and sexual development, and problem-solving and decision-making skills. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133977.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Decision Making Skills, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Hispanics, Minority Groups, Parent Child Interaction, Parent Child Relationship, Preventive Health Care Education, School Dropouts, School Health Programs, School Health Services, Sexual Activity, Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Piper D. n.d.. Project Model Health [Final report]. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Division of Health, 75 pp.

Annotation: Project Model Health (PMH) was an innovative adolescent health promotion project targeting students in grades 7-9. PMH had behavioral objectives in the areas of nutrition, marijuana use, drinking and driving, tobacco use, and sexuality. The strategies used during 32-37 hours of classroom instruction were taken from recent research on effective adolescent health promotion and substance abuse prevention programming. The strategies included: use of college-age role models as instructors; focus on analyzing media messages; practice of peer refusal skills; feedback of peer norm information; emphasis on short-term effects of behavior; use of public commitments; and health advocacy behavior. The evaluation of PMH included extensive, qualitative process evaluation examining the actual implementation of the program as well as a quasi-experimental outcome evaluation. Assuming future follow-up fails to show significant outcome differences between instructor-led and teacher-led PMH, it was recommended to use carefully selected teachers rather than college-age instructors. Based on these promising results, further implementation and evaluation of the PMH approach and curriculum was recommended. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103316.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Health promotion, Impaired driving, Marijuana, Nutrition, Sexuality, Tobacco use

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.