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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (5,425 total).

Stein REK, Jessop DJ, Ireys HT, eds. rev. 1984. Conference report: Education of pediatricians for the ongoing care of children with special health care needs, July 26-28, 1983. New York, NY: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, 45 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the organization, structure and objectives of the conference on educating pediatricians in the care of children with special health needs. The conference was organized into small group sessions dealing with the following topics: roles of the pediatrician in the care of children with special needs, skills needed for executing identified roles, how current medical education fosters and obstructs the development of needed skills, enhancing the preparation of pediatricians for the care of children with special health needs, and a discussion about what changes need to be made to educational programs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Montefiore Medical Center , Rosenthal 4, Room Red Zone SE Pavillion , 111 East 210th Street , Bronx, NY 10467, Telephone: (718) 741-2460 Fax: (718) 654-6692 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.einstein.yu.edu/departments/pediatrics/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Conferences, Educational programs, Medical education, Pediatricians, Professional training, Reports

Pennsylvania Department of Health. n.d.. Local governance leads to strong families and strong communities. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Department of Health, 20 pp.

Annotation: This report looks at the philosophy of Pennsylvania's "Strong Families/Strong Communities" campaign, which stresses the importance of local governance and community strategies to state initiatives designed to preserve families and strengthen communities. It provides descriptions of state strategies and programs that involve community action designed to improve child and family outcomes.

Contact: Pennsylvania Department of Health, Health and Welfare Building, 625 Forster Street, Eighth Floor West, Harrisburg, PA 17120, Telephone: (877) 724-3258 Web Site: http://www.health.pa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child advocacy, Community based services, Community programs, Families, Family preservation programs, Local initiatives, Outreach

New York State Department of Health, Center for Community Health, Division of Epidemiology, Injury Control Program. n.d.. Violence prevention demonstration projects: Project summaries. Albany, NY: New York State Department of Health, Injury Control Program, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report summaries of five model programs in violence prevention supported by the New York State Department of Health. Several programs focus on training for youth and parents. Other topics addressed include mentoring, community service, mediation, conflict resolution, and rape crisis services.

Keywords: Model programs, New York, Violence prevention

Close AK, ed. n.d.. Nutrition education in child feeding programs in the developing countries. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of State, Agency for International Development, Office of Nutrition, 44 pp.

Annotation: This manual is intended to assist village workers at the grass roots level and others in developing countries in teaching mothers and children about the foods children need for growth and health and how to use local foods to improve their diets. Some topics in the manual are: 1) setting goals to fit your community, 2) general rules for teaching, 3) working with mothers of preschool children, and 4) teaching children in school feeding programs. An appendix includes weight and height charts, a questionnaire for learning children's food habits, and other helpful publications. It was prepared in cooperation with the Maternal Child Health Service, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Contact: U.S. Agency for International Development, Technical Assistance Bureau, Washington, DC 20523 , Price unknown.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Child nutrition programs, Developing countries, Nutrition disorders, Nutrition education, Nutrition services, Training materials

H.E.L.P., Inc. n.d.. Teen pregnancy: Children having children. Seattle, WA: Intermedia, 1 videotape (25 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape provides a prevention-education program dealing with adolescent pregnancy. Aimed at making adolescents realize the consequences of sexual activity, young people who have experienced adolescent pregnancy firsthand share their stories with the audience. Television personalities, public health professionals, as well as counselors, are used to impress upon adolescents the importance of considering the possible outcomes related to sexual activity. The program makes a strong plea for abstinence, but reinforces the need for contraception if one chooses to be sexually active.

Contact: Intermedia, Inc., 1818 Westlake Ave. N, Suite 408, Seattle, WA 98109, Telephone: (800) 553-8336 Secondary Telephone: (206) 284-2995 Fax: (800) 553-1655 E-mail: info@intermedia-inc.com Web Site: http://www.intermedia-inc.com/index.asp $195.00.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Audiovisual materials, Personal narratives, Prevention programs, Sexuality education, Videotapes

Mandel CR, Hutchins VL. n.d.. Maternal and Child Health Block Grant legislative history, Vol. 1: 1981. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, ca. 250 pp.

Annotation: This notebook binder contains an assemblage of documents from 1981 on the consolidation of seven federal categorical programs into one maternal and child health services block grant. The documents include (1) a summary; (2) Public Law 97-35, Maternal and Child Health Services Block Grant Act; (3) an interpretation regarding the termination of certain grants; (4) final rules on the implementation of block grants; (5) House bill 3982; (6) Senate bill 79-492; (7) Senate report 1377; (8) conference report; (9-10) comparison of the House and Senate bills by the Association of State and Territorial MCH and Crippled Children Directors and by the American Academy of Pediatrics; (11) an additional conference report; (12) an excerpt from the Congressional Record; and (13) a work group memo regarding definitions to accompany the MCHS block grant act.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Federal MCH programs, History, Social Security Act, Title V

Bogenschneider K, Small S, Riley D. n.d.. An ecological, risk-focused approach for addressing youth-at-risk issues. Chevy Chase, MD: National 4-H Center, 24 pp.

Annotation: This paper presents a prevention model to reduce problem behavior in adolescents by identifying risk factors and protective factors in an adolescent's environment and targeting gaps between the two at all stages of the adolescent's environmental system—individual, family, peers, school, work, and community. The paper reviews current research on risk and protective factors that influence the well being of youth and suggests implications of this research for developing comprehensive community based prevention programs.

Contact: National 4-H Council, 7100 Connecticut Avenue, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, Telephone: (301) 961-2800 E-mail: info@fourhcouncil.edu Web Site: http://www.fourhcouncil.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Community programs, Environmental influences, Models, Prevention programs, Protective factors, Risk factors

Western Pennsylvania Caring Foundation. n.d.. Public/private partnerships: A working model for children's health care. Pittsburgh, PA: Western Pennsylvania Caring Foundation, 1 videotape (VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape describes the Caring Program for Children and the Children's Health Insurance Program (Blue Cross/Blue Shield's BlueCHIP program) in Pennsylvania. It depicts the health care needs of children living in poverty and children of the uninsured working poor who do not qualify for Medicaid assistance, and explains the unique funding of this collaborative program. Appearances by Fred Rogers of "Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood" and by local medical and government officials underscore the need for this type of program, the reasons for its success, and the ways that public and private resources can join together to help ensure access to primary health care for children. The videotape concludes with a television clip describing the program on NBC's "America Close Up." [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Access to health care, Audiovisual materials, Child health, Corporate programs, Insurance, Local MCH programs, Medical assistance, Pennsylvania, Primary care, Public private partnerships, Videotapes

Saenz T. n.d.. Family curriculum. Honolulu, HI: Baby S.A.F.E. Hawaii, and Big Island Substance Abuse Council, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines a curriculum for families that includes information on self-knowledge, awareness of the effects of alcohol and other drugs, and developing more effective behavior. The materials used in classes are not included with the document. Baby S.A.F.E. is funded by the Hawaii State Department of Health, Maternal and Child Health Branch, and emphasizes prevention, early intervention, and treatment of substance-abusing women who use alcohol, tobacco, and legal or illegal drugs.

Contact: Hawaii Department of Health, Maternal and Child Health Branch, Baby S.A.F.E. Program, 741-A Sunset Avenue, Room 208, Honolulu, HI 96816, Telephone: (808) 733-9022 Fax: (808) 733-9032 Web Site: http://health.hawaii.gov/mchb/home/baby-s-a-f-e-program Price unknown.

Keywords: Curricula, Families, Prevention programs, Substance abuse, Treatment, Women

Pittsburgh/Allegheny County Healthy Start. n.d.. Guidebook for healthy mothers, children, families. Pittsburgh, PA: Allegheny County Healthy Start Project, 70 pp.

Annotation: This directory lists a variety of programs and services in the Pittsburgh area that are available to mothers, children, and families. It also contains health tips and fact sheets for infant care. Topics include the following: 1) child health clinics; 2) dental health; 3) family health services; 4) family/home-based support services; 5) family planning services; 6) family support centers; 7) grief support; 8) health and safety programs; and 9) Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Pittsburgh/Allegheny & Fayette County Healthy Start, 400 North Lexington Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA Telephone: (412) 247-1000 Secondary Telephone: (412) 247-4009 Contact Phone: (412) 578-8003 Fax: (412) 578-8325 Contact E-mail: 104626@compuserv.com Web Site: http://healthystartpittsburgh.org/ Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Case management, Child care services, Community programs, Family centered services, Family planning, Family support services, Infant health, Outreach, Pittsburgh Healthy Start, Social services

Boston Healthy Start Initiative. n.d.. Outline of BHSI's pilot nurturing program presently funded through the Carnegie Foundation known as Connect the DOTS. Boston, MA: Boston Healthy Start Initiative, 33 pp.

Annotation: This manual describes a pilot family nurturing program, in which parents and children attend a series of classes together. In outline form, the manual explains how the pilot program works and how it is implemented, the philosophy and constructs behind the program, the timeline and budget for the program, and an evaluation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Boston Healthy Start Initiative, 1010 Massachusetts Avenue, Second Floor, Boston, MA 02118, Telephone: (617) 534-5395 Secondary Telephone: (617) 534-9799 Contact Phone: (617) 534-7828 Fax: (617) 534-5358 E-mail: healthystart@bphc.org Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Boston Healthy Start, Community based services, Community programs, Facilitating services, Family relations, Family support services, Outreach, Parent education programs, Training materials

District of Columbia Healthy Start Project. n.d.. The D.C. Healthy Start Project's peer education/teen theater program: How to start your own peer educator/teen theater program manual. Washington, DC: District of Columbia Healthy Start Project, 34 pp.

Annotation: This manual is designed to help peer educators start their own teen theater program. Through a series of 20–30 minute skits, peer educators are trained to help adolescents better understand a variety of health issues. The manual explains the philosophy of the teen theater program and how to establish such a program. The manual includes skits, activities, and exercises. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: District of Columbia Healthy Start Project, Office of Maternal and Child Health, St. Elizabeth's Campus, Cottage Seven, 2700 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, S.E., Washington, DC 20032, Telephone: (202) 645-4174 Contact Phone: (202) 645-5624 Fax: (202) 645-5084 Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent health programs, Adolescent health promotion, Adolescents, District of Columbia Healthy Start, Manuals, Outreach, Peer education, Risk prevention, Theater, Training materials

Chicago Area Healthy Start Project. n.d.. Breastfeeding peer counselor: Train the trainer. Springfield, IL: Chicago Area Healthy Start Project, 242 pp.

Annotation: This is a training guide for peer counselors who train mothers in breastfeeding techniques. It is part of the Healthy Start Program in the Chicago area. Topics in the training guide include the following: 1) getting acquainted, 2) the art of counseling, 3) the role of the peer counselor, 4) how to start breastfeeding, 5) preventing and managing problems, 6) nutrition, and 7) infant health. Each session in the guide contains an outline; exercises; and handouts, forms, or both. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Chicago Healthy Start, 535 West Jefferson Street, First Floor, Springfield, IL 62761, Telephone: (312) 793-4662 Contact Phone: (217) 782-4890 Fax: (217) 782-4890 Price unknown.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Curricula, Infant feeding, Infant health, Lactation management, Training materials

Mile Square Health Center. n.d.. Healthy 2000: Educating our youth. Springfield, IL: Mile Square Health Center, 18 pp.

Annotation: This information packet is designed for adolescent health advocate trainees who work in the "Healthy 2000 : Educating Our Youth" program. The packet describes the goals and objectives of the program, lists the skills trainees are expected to develop, outlines the curriculum, and contains a skills checklist and an evaluation form to test participants' knowledge of adolescent health issues.

Contact: Chicago Healthy Start, 535 West Jefferson Street, First Floor, Springfield, IL 62761, Telephone: (312) 793-4662 Contact Phone: (217) 782-4890 Fax: (217) 782-4890 Price unknown.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent programs, Community health centers, Community programs, Curricula, Healthy People 2000, Training materials

Hallstrom BJ. n.d.. Utilization of nursing personnel: A task specific approach. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 14 pp. (Comment series no: 0-7 (30))

Annotation: This paper seeks to establish a theoretical rationale for task delegation of nursing personnel based on the concept of independent and delegated functioning. Preliminary findings from a study of how a sample of projects are utilizing nursing and other personnel in performance of selected tasks is also presented, along with their view as to ideal utilization of personnel for performing these tasks, and the consensus of their judgment as to the type, whether independent or delegated, each task is deemed to be. Such task analysis is discussed as the first step in developing the criteria for interchangeability of personnel and delegation of tasks, and for optimal utilization of personnel within comprehensive health care programs. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children and Youth Projects, Nurses, Personnel management, Program evaluation, Title V programs

Tunick FL, Butterweck JE, Landman PD. n.d.. Parental evaluation of health care delivery in a children and youth project. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 9 pp. (Comment series no: 0-7 (31))

Annotation: The purpose of this paper is to describe a method used to assess community acceptance of a program to deliver comprehensive health care to children of low income families in New York City and to report the results. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title II. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Federal MCH programs, Low income groups, New York, Program evaluation, Program evaluation, Questionnaires

Haugen IH. n.d.. A comparison between the social work profession and the nursing profession: Philosophy, theory and practice. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 25 pp. (Comment series no: 0-10 (34))

Williams JR, ed., Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff. n.d.. Mount Zion survey: Housing, nutrition, education. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 17 pp. (Comment series no: 1-5 (37))

Annotation: This paper reports a survey to make the Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff knowledgeable and able to support all expressions of concern with substantive information. The survey among a sample of project families attempted to delineate the family's housing situation in regard to space, safety and sanitation; the nutritional status in regard to availability of food, shopping practices and dietary intake; and the children's educational placement and experiences in school and the parents' perception of the schools. The survey is also designed to document the adequacy and effectiveness of existing social services and agencies in the community to deal with these problems. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Educational factors, Federal MCH programs, Housing, Nutritional status, Program evaluation, Social services, Surveys, Title V programs

McIntire MS, Mitchell JR. n.d.. Comprehensive health care delivery for children and youth: A combined approach. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 7 pp. (Comment series no: 2-1 (41))

Annotation: This paper reports a Children and Youth Project conducted by combining the forces of a medical school and a health department, by maintaining role differentiation in respect to education and service, and by developing a Central Health Record and communication system to develop and increase comprehensive health services for children and youth residing in the target areas of poverty. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Comprehensive health services, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

Gedgoud JL, McIntire MS. n.d.. Progress report of a combined approach for children and youth services. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 11 pp. (Comment series no: 3-2 (45))

Annotation: This report demonstrates graphically how a combination of a health department and a medical school compress to the national average of all Children and Youth projects. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs Comprehensive health services, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.