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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (20 total).

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2015. Family engagement inventory. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource provides information about family engagement practices across child welfare, juvenile justice, behavioral health, education, and early education. Contents include links to organizations, agencies, and information that support family engagement within three domains. Contents include methods, plans of action, processes, and/or policies designed to be used by frontline staff of each discipline to enhance or achieve family engagement; links to and information on selected practices and programs that are validated and supported by a documented, evaluative process as they relate to family engagement; and links to information and websites that provide additional literature about family engagement processes, methods, and programs.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Administrative policy, Child welfare, Early childhood education, Juvenile justice, Mental health, Methods, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Participation, Research

Golden O, Emam D. 2013. How health care reform can help children and families in the child welfare system: Options for action. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 31 pp. (Low-income working families, paper 25)

Annotation: This paper considers the implications of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on child welfare families, specifically on youth aging out of foster care, parents and guardians of children in (or at risk of entering) the child welfare system, and children already involved in the system. It also offers potential strategies for action by state and federal child welfare and health officials, philanthropic funders, and outside expert to enhance coverage and improve care.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child welfare, Children, Expanded eligibility, Federal initiatives, Foster care, Foster parents, Health care reform, Health insurance, Low income groups, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, State initiatives

Allen KD, Pires SA, Mahadevan R. 2012. Improving outcomes for children in child welfare: A Medicaid managed care toolkit. [Hamilton, NJ]: Center for Health Care Strategies, 49 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit describes the efforts of the nine Medicaid managed care organizations (MCOs) that participated in Improving Outcomes for Children Involved in Child Welfare: A CHCS Quality Improvement Collaborative, designed by the Center for Health Care Strategies (CHCS) and funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The toolkit includes a project overview, an overview and description of the impact of the MCOs' initiatives, and discussions of care coordination and lessons learned.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child health, Child welfare, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Collaboration, Ethnic factors, Foster care, Foster children, High risk children, Initiatives, Low income groups, Medicaid managed care, Mental health, Programs, Racial factors

U.S. General Accounting Office. 2003. Child welfare: Most states are developing statewide information systems, but the reliability of child welfare data could be improved. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 66 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the following issues: (1) states' experiences in developing child welfare information systems and the Department of Health and Human Services' (DHHS') role in assisting in their development, (2) factors that affect the reliability of data that states collect and report on children served by their welfare agencies, and DHHS's role in ensuring the reliability of those data, and (3) practices that child welfare agencies use to overcome challenges associated with the Statewide Automated Child Welfare Information System's (SACWIS's) development and data reliability. Four appendices include the scope and methodology, state SACWIS stages of development, comments from DHHS, and General Accounting Office (GAO) contacts and acknowledgments. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. The report concludes with a bibliography and a list of related GAO products.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-03-809.

Keywords: Child welfare agencies, Data, Data collection, Department of Health and Human Services, Information systems

Whyte R. 1996. Family preservation: An integrated approach [Final report]. Phoenix, AZ: Arizona Department of Health Services, 81 pp.

Annotation: The Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS) administers family-centered, community-based programs that serve at-risk children and their families. ADHS hired a full-time consultant for the Home Visiting for At-Risk Families Initiative to develop a plan to integrate and coordinate existing home-based intervention services funded by ADHS. The consultant developed home visitation program standards, guidelines, and training modules that were used in planning any community-based programs. This was accomplished in collaboration with a range of other governmental agencies, health care providers, community-based service providers, and families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB98-155690.

Keywords: Child Welfare Agencies, Community Integrated Service System program, Family Preservation and Family Support Act, Home Visiting for At Risk Families

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1995. Welfare to work: Participants' characteristics and services provided in JOBS. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of an analysis of the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS) program which was designed as a transition program which would provide welfare recipients the skills they needed to gain employment. This report includes background information on the JOBS program and reviews the implications of program reforms being considered in the Personal Responsibility Act of 1995. It assesses the characteristics of those served and not served by the program, describes the services provided, and discusses the impact of imposing time limitations on the delivery of welfare services.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-95-93.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Employment, Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS), Policy development, Program descriptions, Welfare programs, Welfare reform

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1995. Welfare to work: Measuring outcomes for JOBS participants. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 43 pp.

Annotation: This report considers what outcome evaluation techniques have been established by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and by state programs to measure the employment outcomes of participants in the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS) program. It presents the results of interviews of DHHS officials and welfare research and interest groups and a questionnaire sent to state JOBS administrators. It also examines issues that should be included in establishing a national approach to measuring the JOBS participant outcomes and setting performance goals. It presents the results in brief and in full, describes the scope and methodology, and includes a copy of the questionnaire.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-95-86.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Employment, Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS), Outcome evaluation, Welfare reform

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1994. Families on welfare: Focus on teenage mothers could enhance welfare reform efforts. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews data on adolescent mothers who are the heads families which are enrolled in the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program to determine which characteristics influence their length of stay on welfare. It contains background information on Aid to Families with Dependent Children and the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS) program, on initiatives to reform the programs, and on the methodology used in the study. The report provides information on the level of education for single adolescent mothers, the time elapsed since they were last employed, and the number and age of their children; factors which affect their participation in Aid to Families with Dependent Children. The report presents and discusses the findings and reviews the implications for developing future policies regarding welfare.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-94-112.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent parents, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Federal programs, Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS), Participants, Policy development, Single parents, Statistics, Welfare programs, Welfare reform

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1994. Child welfare: HHS begins to assume leadership to implement national and state systems. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 44 pp.

Annotation: This report describes steps the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has taken to provide guidance to states in developing a nationwide adoption and foster care data collection system. Included in the report is a model child welfare information system developed by a work group of several states and DHHS. The system is more comprehensive than the functional requirements established by DHHS.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/AIMD-94-37.

Keywords: Adoption, Child welfare, Federal agencies, Foster care, Information systems, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1994. Welfare to work: Current AFDC program not sufficiently focused on employment. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 41 pp.

Annotation: This report assesses the progress the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS) program has made in 1) serving an increasingly larger portion of the Aid to Families with Dependent Children caseload, especially those who are at risk of long welfare stays, and 2) ensuring that program participants get work and leave Aid to Families with Dependent Children. It combines the preliminary results from several studies currently being conducted with findings from previously published GAO reports and other current research.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-95-28.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Employment, Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS), Vocational education, Welfare reform

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1993. Welfare to work: States move unevenly to serve teen parents in JOBS. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 60 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the findings of a random sampling of adolescent parents in 16 states who were receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children and were also participating in the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS) program. It includes information on the states' efforts to enroll adolescent mothers in the JOBS program and to help them complete their secondary education so they can obtain employment, the approaches the states have used to serve adolescent parents in the JOBS program, and barriers that have kept the adolescent parents from completing their education. The report describes the scope and methodology, provides selected characteristics of the study group and the JOBS services reviewed, and includes a sample of the questionnaire. The results are given in brief, and in detail; and policy recommendations are included.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HRD-93-74.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent parents, Education, Federal programs, Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS), Program evaluation, State programs, Statistics, Surveys, Vocational education, Welfare programs, Welfare services

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1979. Evaluating benefits and risks of obstetric practices: More coordinated federal and private efforts needed. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 68 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the need for the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) to better organize its activities relating to medical practices used during childbirth and to increase its efforts, in concert with the private medical community, in evaluating these practices and risks. A review of the research literature is discussed. The role of the federal government in helping to resolve the controversy over obstetric practices is examined; accompanied by conclusions, evaluation of HEW comments and recommendations, and comments by professional organizations. A glossary and charts derived from data obtained from the Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities are included in the appendix.

Keywords: Childbirth, Federal government, Obstetrical care, U.S. Department of Health Education and Welfare

U.S. Congress, Senate Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. [1973]. Caspar W. Weinberger to be Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare: Hearings, part 2, appendix—Comprehensive HEW simplification and reform mega proposal. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 206 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a planned comprehensive simplification and reform that is a redesign of the entire Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW). The report includes the following sections: (1) overview, (2) assistance to individuals, (3) assistance to state and localities, (4) capacity building, (5) other HEW activities, (6) programs which may be changed or phased out, (7) chart presentation, and (8) budget tables.

Keywords: Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Federal agencies, Reform

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. 1972. A common thread of service: An historical guide to HEW. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 52 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the development of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare since April, 1953, when it replaced the Federal Security Agency. It includes an organization chart, a list of budgets since 1953, legislation, program highlights, and a list of key officials, organized by the years they served.

Keywords: Department of Health, Education, Federal government, History, Legislation, S, U, and Welfare

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Region III, Maternal and Child Health Service. 1972. 1972 annual report. Philadelphia, PA: Region III, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Maternal and Child Health Service, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews the progress in maternal and child health in Region III of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare during fiscal year 1972. The report is based on information received from individuals in the State Maternal and Child Health Services, State Crippled Children's Services, Maternity and Infant Care Projects, Intensive Care Projects, Projects for Comprehensive Health Care for Preschool and School Age Children, special projects, and other highlights. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Federal MCH programs, Maternity and Infant Care Projects, Reports

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1969. The Children's Bureau's job today. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Children's Bureau, 73 pp. ([Children's Bureau publication])

Annotation: This document describes the work of the Children's Bureau. The Bureau's work with infant mortality, maternity and infant care projects, family planning, comprehensive child welfare services, child care services, services for crippled children, cooperative mechanisms, and treatment of juvenile offenders are discussed. The second section of the document describes the Children's Bureau programs including graphical statistical reports. It is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Child care services, Child welfare, Children with developmental disabilities, Children's Bureau, Cooperation, Family planning, Federal MCH programs, Infant care, Infant mortality, Juvenile delinquents, Maternity and Infant Care Projects, Obstetrical care, Reports, Statistics

U.S. Congress, House Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, Subcommittee on Public Health and Welfare. 1969. HEW oversight: Hearing . Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report constitutes a transcript of the statement of Robert H. Finch, secretary, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, as well as others, before the Subcommittee on Public Health and Welfare of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, House of Representatives, on March 5, 1969. The purpose of the statement is to discuss the mission and organization of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. Tables and figures are included in the report.

Keywords: Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Education, Federal government, Federal legislation, Federal programs, Health

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Advisory Committee on HEW Relationships With State Health Agencies. 1966. Report to the secretary. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Advisory Committee on HEW Relationships With State Health Agencies, 141 pp.

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Secretary's Committee on Mental Retardation . 1964. Response to the recommendations of the President's Panel on Mental Retardation, November 1962 - November, 1963.. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Secretary's Committee on Mental Retardation, 69 pp.

Annotation: The report of the President's Panel on Mental Retardation was presented to President Kennedy in October, 1962. The report contains recommended action to combat mental retardation in the fields of research, prevention, services, education, vocational rehabilitation, training, residential care, the law, and public awareness. The Department of Health, Education, and Welfare is responsible for the implementation of almost all of these recommendations. This report lists the Department's response made from November 1962 to November 1962 to the recommendations of the panel. The Department's response falls into three main categories: The special message of President Kennedy to Congress, legislation enacted in response to the Panel's recommendations, and other responses. These categories are used as the format for listing the Department's responses in this report.

Keywords: Education, Federal legislation, Mental health services, Mental retardation, Prevention, Reports, Research, Residential care, Training, US Department of Health Education and Welfare, Vocational rehabilitation

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office of the Secretary. 1958. The advancement of medical research and education through the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare: Final report of the Secretary's Consultants on Medical Research and Education. Washington, DC: Office of the Secretary, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare; for sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office, 82 pp.

Annotation: This report states a philosophy and a set of principles that will provide important guidelines for the development of the medical education and research affairs of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. The report places the total medical research effort of the nation in the context of our economy and culture and offers some broad conclusions relating to the future of medical research that may help in developing public policy in these fields in the future. The report is divided into three parts: (1) the national base -- money, manpower, and facilities, (2) the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare -- exclusive of the National Institutes of Health, and (3) The National Institutes of Health of the Public Health Service. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report.

Keywords: Cultural factors, Department of Health, Economics, Education, Federal agencies, Health agencies, Medical education, Medical research, Public policy, and Welfare

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.