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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (93 total).

Williams JR, ed., Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff. n.d.. Mount Zion survey: Housing, nutrition, education. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 17 pp. (Comment series no: 1-5 (37))

Annotation: This paper reports a survey to make the Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff knowledgeable and able to support all expressions of concern with substantive information. The survey among a sample of project families attempted to delineate the family's housing situation in regard to space, safety and sanitation; the nutritional status in regard to availability of food, shopping practices and dietary intake; and the children's educational placement and experiences in school and the parents' perception of the schools. The survey is also designed to document the adequacy and effectiveness of existing social services and agencies in the community to deal with these problems. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Educational factors, Federal MCH programs, Housing, Nutritional status, Program evaluation, Social services, Surveys, Title V programs

McIntire MS, Mitchell JR. n.d.. Comprehensive health care delivery for children and youth: A combined approach. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 7 pp. (Comment series no: 2-1 (41))

Annotation: This paper reports a Children and Youth Project conducted by combining the forces of a medical school and a health department, by maintaining role differentiation in respect to education and service, and by developing a Central Health Record and communication system to develop and increase comprehensive health services for children and youth residing in the target areas of poverty. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Comprehensive health services, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

Gedgoud JL, McIntire MS. n.d.. Progress report of a combined approach for children and youth services. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 11 pp. (Comment series no: 3-2 (45))

Annotation: This report demonstrates graphically how a combination of a health department and a medical school compress to the national average of all Children and Youth projects. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs Comprehensive health services, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

De Geyndt W. n.d.. Evaluation of health programs: An annotated bibliography. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 107 pp. (Comment series no.: 8-9 (9))

Annotation: This bibliography is a revision and updating of comment series no. 7-9 (4) with the addition new sources and annotations for all sources. This publication supersedes the previous non-annotated bibliography, "Bibliography on Evaluation of Health Programs." This is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: .Comprehensive health care, Adolescent health programs, Bibliographies, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Federal MCH programs, Health services, Program evaluation, Title V programs

Weckwerth VE. n.d.. The comprehensive hardware store: An analogy prepared in response to a request for the difference between comprehensive health care and other care. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 6 pp. (Comment series no.: 8-9 (10))

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2019. Intensive care coordination for children and youth with complex mental and substance use disorders: State and community profiles. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 435 pp.

Annotation: This document updates a 2014 profiles report, by (1) categorizing states' intensive care coordination (ICC) efforts into sustainability, implementation or pre-implementation groups; (2) identifying key informants; and (3) expanding the questionnaire template used in surveying the states. This updated profiles report is intended to assist states interested in improving outcomes for children and youth with complex mental and substance use disorders by developing or revamping ICC. includes lessons learned from 40 states and a small number of local jurisdictions that have implemented ICC, with and without high quality Wraparound, and is intended to support innovation around state efforts.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: PEP19-04-01-001..

Keywords: Access to care, Children, Mental disorders, Mental health services, Service coordination, State programs, Substance abuse, Youth

U.S. Children's Bureau, Child Welfare Information Gateway, FRIENDS National Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention. 2016. Building community, building hope: 2016 prevention resource guide. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Familes, 104 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information, strategies, and resources to help communities support and strengthen families and promote the well-being of children and youth. It focuses on protective factors that build on family strengths and promote optimal child and youth development. Topics include implementing a protective factors approach, working with families using protective factors, and using protective factors as a framework for community partnerships. Contents include tools and strategies to assist service providers in integrating protective factors into community programs and systems. Tips sheets for parents and caregivers are provided.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community based services, Community programs, Consumer education materials, Families, Program improvement, Protective factors, Public private partnerships, Resources for professionals, Service delivery systems, Systems development, Youth

FrameWorks Institute. 2016. Shifting gears on juvenile justice: A FrameWorks communications toolkit. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute, 1 v.

Annotation: This toolkit models how to frame the juvenile justice system and related issues as important policy fields and matters of public concern. Topics include the science of adolescent development and the need to incorporate a developmental perspective into criminal justice policies designed for youth; why the current approaches to juvenile crime aren't working; and age-appropriate treatments and interventions that improve outcomes for those already in the system and preventive programs that divert more youth away from juvenile detention and towards programs that better serve their needs. Contents include sample "ready to go" communications that can be used as is or adapted and repurposed for an organization's needs, communications examples that demonstrate the "do's and don'ts" of the framing recommendations, graphics that model the key concepts of the recommendations, and annotations that explain the framing strategies being illustrated.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Communication, Interdisciplinary approach, Intervention, Juvenile delinquency, Juvenile justice, Policy development, Prevention, Public awareness materials, Systems development, Youth services

Pergamit M, Gelatt J, Stratford B, Beckwith S, Martin MC. 2016. Family interventions for youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 92 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes existing evidence on family intervention strategies for youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness. The report includes a summary of common elements of effective interventions and a discussion of gaps in the evidence base. Key implementation lessons and challenges of implementing family intervention models are also included. The appendices contain information abuot the literature review methodology; key informants; and program descriptions including evidence-based, evidence-informed, promising, and emerging interventions as well as interventions of interest and those with mixed findings.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family support services, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Interventions, Model programs, Youth services

SHAPE America: Society of Health and Physical Educators. 2016. Providing community-based PE services for students with disabilities in special education transition programs. Reston, VA: SHAPE America: Society of Health and Physical Educators, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document for physical educators provides guidance on ensuring that students in community-based transition programs receive physical education services in community settings, and that those services are developed and implemented by certified adapted physical education teachers. Contents include background, reasons for concern, clarification from the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs, a call to action, and best practices and recommendations for providing meaningful physical education services in secondary special education transition programs.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Community based services, Disabilities, Models, Nutrition education, Physical activity, Physical education, Students, Teaching, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Youth in transition programs

Heider F, Wirth B, Kuznetsov RD. 2016. Medicaid managed care: Challenges and opportunities for pediatric medical home implementation and children and youth with special health care needs. Elk Grove Village, IL: National Center for Medical Home Implementation, 5 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for Title V programs, clinicians, and family leaders provides information about the potential effect of Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) managed care on children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) and their families. Topics include requirements for managed care organizations in CHIP and opportunities to mitigate potential unintended negative consequences of Medicaid managed care for CYSHCN and their families. Promising practices and strategies from states are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Resource Center for Patient/Family-Centered Medical Home, American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (847) 434-7605 Secondary Telephone: (800) 433-9016, ext. 7605 Web Site: https://medicalhomeinfo.aap.org/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Contract services, Enrollment, Family centered care, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Medicaid managed care, Medical home, Model programs, Primary care, Service delivery systems, Special health care needs, State MCH programs, Youth

Suicide Prevention Resource Center. 2014. Suicide prevention among LGBT youth: A workshop for professionals who serve youth. Waltham, MA: Education Development Center, 4 files.

Annotation: This toolkit contains workshop materials to build the capacity of schools, youth-serving organizations, and suicide prevention programs, with the larger goal of reducing suicidal behavior among LGBT youth. The leader's guide contains information about the history of the workshop; goals and objectives; intended audience; co-leaders; an overview of the workshop kit; instructions on workshop preparation, implementation, and follow-up; and a sample agenda, attendance sheet, exercise, certificate of attendance, and leader feedback form. The toolkit also includes handouts and presenter slides and notes.

Contact: Suicide Prevention Resource Center, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (877) 438-7772 Secondary Telephone: (617) 964-5448 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: info@sprc.org Web Site: http://www.sprc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Cultural competence, Homosexuality, Injury prevention, Mental health services, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health services, Self injurious behavior, Suicide prevention, Training materials, Youth

Ryan C. 2014. A practitioner's resource guide: Helping families to support their LGBT children. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 15 pp.

Catalyst Center. 2014. Dancing with data: Using data to support your message (rev.). Boston, MA: Catalyst Center, 10 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information for policymakers and advocates on using statistical data to illustrate issues of coverage and financing of care for children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) to inform effective decision making. Topics include types of data, sources of data, and tips for using and different data types and sources. The document also outlines steps for collecting and communicating data and family stories. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Catalyst Center, the National Center for Health Insurance and Financing for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs, Boston University School of Public Health, Center for Advancing Health Policy and Practice, 801 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, MA 02218-2526, Telephone: (617) 638-1930 E-mail: mcomeau@bu.edu Web Site: http://cahpp.org/project/the-catalyst-center Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Communication, Data sources, Decision making, Financing, Health insurance, Program improvement, Special health care services, Statistical data, Youth

Desiderio G, Garrido M, Garcia M, Eisler A. 2014. Lessons learned in providing health care services for Native youth. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 7 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes agency efforts to provide health care services for Native youth and their lessons learned. Topics include health issues Native youth commonly face, ways youth use health services, youth-friendly services and ways to provide them, and integrating Native culture and traditional practices with medical practice. The report concludes with a discussion of areas and issues that need to be addressed in order to increase the number of youth accessing services, as well as suggestions for other agencies and clinics trying to establish health services for Native youth.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Barriers, Cultural factors, Culturally competent services, Ethnic groups, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Service integration, Youth

Bonnie RJ, Stroud C, Breiner H, eds.; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Improving the Health, Safety, and Well-Being of Young Adults; National Research Council. 2014. Investing in the health and well-being of young adults. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 433 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes what is known about the health, safety, and well-being of young adults and offers recommendations for policy and research. Contents include a cross-cutting recommendation that applies to all policies and programs addressing young adults, whether public or private, in all sectors of society. Subsequent recommendations focus on the key domains of relationships, education and employment, civic engagement and national service, public health, the health care systems, and government investments in marginalized young adults.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Evidence based medicine, Health status, Preventive health services, School to work transition, Service integration, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Young adults, Youth in transition programs

Syed K. 2014. Ensuring young people's access to preventive services in the Affordable Care Act. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 13 pp.

Annotation: This paper examines the preventive services available to young people through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and how advocates, policymakers, and program planners can help ensure that young people have access to the health care they need. Topics include preventive services available without cost-sharing, which plans must comply, when services are covered, preventive services and Medicaid, enforcement of the ACA, and barriers to access for young people, and recommendations. Descriptions of ACA regulations affecting youth are provided in the appendix.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Confidentiality, Health care reform, Health insurance, Medicaid, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Preventive health services, Reproductive health, Sexual health, Youth

Palfrey J, Rosen-Reynoso M, Ogilus N, Foley S . 2013. Reducing health disparities for Hispanic children with special health care needs. Boston, MA: National Center for Community-Based Services, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report documents the problems that Hispanic families of children and youth with special health care needs and their providers confront, explore innovative solutions and suggest a number of areas that warrant further policy consideration. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Ease of Use of Community-Based Services, c/o Institute for Community Inclusion, University of Massachusetts, Boston, 100 Morrissey Boulevard, Boston, MA 02125, Telephone: (617) 287-4370 E-mail: communitybasedsrvcs@umb.edu Web Site: http://communitybasedservices.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Community based services, Hispanics, Youth

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. Supporting your LGBTQ youth: A guide for foster parents. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 11 pp. (Factsheet for families)

Annotation: This fact sheet for families provides information about how foster parents can support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. The fact sheet provides background information about LGBTQ youth and discusses LGBTQ youth and the child welfare system, creating a welcoming home for youth, and supporting youth in the community.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Bullying, Child welfare agencies, Community programs, Foster children, Foster parents, Homosexuality, Parent support services, Prevention, Schools, Social services, Youth, Youth development

Boyd LW. 2013. Theraeputic foster care: Exceptional care for complex, trauma-impacted youth in foster care. Washington, DC: First Focus, State Policy and Advocacy Reform Center, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about best practices in therapeutic or treatment foster care (TFC), a clinical intervention for youth from birth to age 18 who have severe mental, emotional, or behavioral health needs. Topics include essential partners; building relationships among provider agencies and child advocates; example practices in Connecticut, Illinois, Michigan, Oklahoma, Nebraska; efforts to expand the focus beyond safety and permanency to well-being for youth in therapeutic foster care; and public policy challenges.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents with special health care needs, Advocacy, Behavioral medicine, Children with special health care needs, Foster care, Foster parents, Health services delivery, Intervention, Medically fragile children, Mental health, Policy development, Psychological needs, Reimbursement, Relationships, Therapeutics, Training, Trauma care, Youth

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.