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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 19 (19 total).

Health Services for Children with Special Needs, The National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health, and District of Columbia Department of Health. 2016. Health care transition for adolescents and young adults: An online video CME series. Washington, DC: Health Services for Children with Special Needs, 1 v.

Annotation: This online course offers a brief review of clinical recommendations on transition and a tested quality improvement model. It also features physicians in pediatric, family medicine, and internal medicine practices in the District of Columbia who successfully implemented core elements of health care transition using quality improvement methodologies.

Contact: Health Services for Children with Special Needs, 1101 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 467-2737 Secondary Telephone: (866) 937-4549 Fax: (202) 466-8514 Web Site: http://www.hscsn-net.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Continuing education, Distance education, Multimedia, School to work transition, Transition planning, Transitions, Youth in transition programs

Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative. 2016. Preparing for the road ahead: Helping young people transition from foster care to adulthood. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the successes and vision of a national initiative to help young people transition from foster care and thrive. Contents include information about the initiative's impact, timeline, core strategies, outcome areas, and next steps. The report describes how the initiative is helping young people in foster care achieve critical milestones in permanence, education, employment, financial capability, housing, physical and mental health, and social capital; how the initiative integrates young people's voices into its work; and how it collaborates with national and local partners, policymakers, and young people to create conditions that improve outcomes for youth transitioning to adulthood.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Collaboration, Foster care, National initiatives, Outcome and process assessment, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Public private partnerships, School to work transition, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Transitions, Young adults, Youth development, Youth in transition programs

SHAPE America: Society of Health and Physical Educators. 2016. Providing community-based PE services for students with disabilities in special education transition programs. Reston, VA: SHAPE America: Society of Health and Physical Educators, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document for physical educators provides guidance on ensuring that students in community-based transition programs receive physical education services in community settings, and that those services are developed and implemented by certified adapted physical education teachers. Contents include background, reasons for concern, clarification from the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs, a call to action, and best practices and recommendations for providing meaningful physical education services in secondary special education transition programs.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Community based services, Disabilities, Models, Nutrition education, Physical activity, Physical education, Students, Teaching, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Youth in transition programs

Antosh AA, Blair M, Edwards K, Goode T, Hewitt A, Izzo M, Johnson DR, Raynor O, Riddle I, Shanley JL, Walker R, Wehmeyer M. 2014. A comprehensive approach to transition. Silver Spring, MD: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 21 pp.

Bonnie RJ, Stroud C, Breiner H, eds.; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Improving the Health, Safety, and Well-Being of Young Adults; National Research Council. 2014. Investing in the health and well-being of young adults. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 433 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes what is known about the health, safety, and well-being of young adults and offers recommendations for policy and research. Contents include a cross-cutting recommendation that applies to all policies and programs addressing young adults, whether public or private, in all sectors of society. Subsequent recommendations focus on the key domains of relationships, education and employment, civic engagement and national service, public health, the health care systems, and government investments in marginalized young adults.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Evidence based medicine, Health status, Preventive health services, School to work transition, Service integration, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Young adults, Youth in transition programs

Fordham Interdisciplinary Parent Representation Project. [2012]. Guide to working with young parents in out of home care. New York, NY: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 50 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information and guidance for working with pregnant and parenting youth, helping them as they develop both as individuals and as parents through positive casework interactions. The guide encourages a strengths-based approach to ensure the safety of both young parents and their children. It offers suggestions for engaging young parents in conferencing and supportive services while highlighting the importance of maintaining a young parent’s right to privacy and autonomy, and emphasize comprehensive planning for pregnant young people to promote well being, to minimize the need for court intervention, to ensure placement stability and to help young families move more quickly toward permanency. The guide is designed to be used primarily by provider agency case planners, but may also be useful to child protective staff, Family Services Unit staff, parent advocates, attorneys and others who work with this vulnerable population. Topics in planning and services for young parents in out of home care include: legal issues, father participation, collaborative planning and permanency, preventive services, child safety conferences, court intervention, pregnancy-related services, medical home visiting programs, parenting supports, counseling and mental health services, education, child care, and preparing a young parent for leaving foster care. Appendices provide resources for services in adolescent reproductive health, breastfeeding, the WIC program, support services and assistance, teen father support, mentoring and mental health, housing support, legal information, education, hoe visiting, and parenting education programs. Tips sheets are provided on mandatory reporting, early care and education, public housing, and transitional Medicaid.

Contact: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 150 William Street, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 341-0900 Secondary Telephone: (877) KIDSNYC E-mail: http://nyc.gov/html/mail/html/mailacs.html Web Site: http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Child welfare, Family support services, Foster care, New York, Out of home care, Parent education, Social services, State initiatives, Youth in transition programs

New York City Administration for Children's Services. 2012. ABCs of working with young parents in out of home care: Expectations, responsibilities and resources. New York, NY: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document is a source of information and guidance for case planners in New York City in their work with parenting youth and youth planning for the arrival of their baby in foster care, and in developing appropriate service plans for these youth. It discusses roles for agency case planners in referring both expecting mothers and fathers of health and support systems, discussing the role of resource parents for minors who are expecting, securing a stable placement for expecting youth before baby arrives, as well as developing and executing permanency plans for young parents in out-of-home care. Additional information is provided on health care testing and decision-making, legal aspects of pregnancy and parenting, and understanding funding for baby's essential needs. A practice guide summary is included along with resources for community based services, housing and child care, child welfare services, medical mentoring for pregnant and parenting youth, and prevention services.

Contact: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 150 William Street, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 341-0900 Secondary Telephone: (877) KIDSNYC E-mail: http://nyc.gov/html/mail/html/mailacs.html Web Site: http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Child welfare, Family support services, Foster care, New York, Out of home care, Parent education, Social services, State initiatives, Youth in transition programs

Tonniges T, Maddox L. 2012. Boys Town Transition Clinic for Youth in Foster Care: Final report and abstract. Boys Town, NE: Father Flanagan's Boys' Home, 28 pp.

Annotation: This final report focuses on the Boys Town Transition Clinic for Youth in Foster Care during the period March 1, 2007, through July 31, 2012. The clinic was developed to prepare adolescents for accessing health care and leading healthy lives following out-of-home placement. Topics include the purpose of the project and relationship to Title V maternal and child health programs, goals and objectives, methodology, evaluation, outcomes, publications and products, and dissemination and utilization of results. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Final reports, Foster children, Grants, Programs, Social Security Act, Title V, Transition to independent living, Youth in transition programs

FosterClub. 2010. FosterClub transition toolkit. Seaside, OR: FosterClub; Washington, DC: Fostering Connections Resource Center, 34 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to help youth in foster care and the adults supporting them develop a comprehensive plan for transitioning from life in foster care to independent adulthood. The toolkit is built around ten domains: finances and money management; job and career; life skills; identity; permanence; education; self care and health; housing; transportation; and community, culture, and social life. A map provides a quick overview of the ten domains, along with space to write down and keep track of the skills, knowledge, and resources needed to prepare for independent living. Advice on setting goals and step-by-step plans for achieving them are included.

Contact: FosterClub, 753 First Avenue, Seaside, OR 97138, Telephone: (503) 717-1552 Web Site: https://www.fosterclub.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Foster care, Foster children, Foster parents, Oral health, Parents, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Youth in transition programs

Davis M, Jivanjee P, Koroloff N. 2010. Paving the way: Meeting transition needs of young people with developmental disabilities and serious mental health conditions. Portland, OR: Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 73 pp.

Annotation: This report includes eight case studies of programs providing innovative service for adolescents and young adults (ages 16-24) who have both a developmental disability and a mental health condition. The report also includes six short descriptions of specific best practices. The programs featured in the report include a school-based transition program, outpatient mental health services, an employment-preparation program, programs supporting youth transitions from restrictive environments to community settings, system-level crisis-prevention and intervention planning, and system-level planning and consultation.

Contact: Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207-0751, Telephone: (503) 725-4040 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (503) 725-4180 E-mail: janetw@pdx.edu Web Site: http://www.rtc.pdx.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Case studies, Developmental disabilities, Developmental disability programs, Health services, Mental disorders, Mental health, Mental health services, Model programs, Prevention, Program, Service delivery systems, Social services, Transition planning, Young adults, Youth in transition programs

Fleischfresser S. 2009. State implementation grants for integrated community systems for children with special health care needs [Wisconsin]: [Final report]. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Department of Health Services, 29 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This final report for the Wisconsin Integrated Services for Children with Special Health Care Needs program discusses the project purpose; goals and objectives; methodology; evaluation; results, outcomes, and lessons learned; publications and products; dissemination and utilization of results; and sustainability. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Children with special health care needs, Community health services, Families, Final reports, Health care systems, Leadership, Medical home, Parents, Service integration, Wisconsin, Youth in transition programs

Wolraich M. 2009. Sooner SUCCESS: State implementation grants for integrated community systems for CSHCN. [Final report]. Oklahoma City, OK: Board of Regents University of Oklahoma, 185 pp.

Annotation: This final report for the Sooner SUCCESS (State Unified Children's Comprehensive Exemplary Service for Special Needs) program discusses the project purpose; goals and objectives; methodogy; evaluation; results, outcomes, and lessons learned; publications and products; dissemination and utilization of results; and sustainability. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Final reports, Adolescents with special health care needs, Children with special health care needs, Communities, Community health services, Families, Family support services, Health care systems, Medical home, Oklahoma, Parents, School to work transition, Service coordination, Service integration, Transition to independent living, Youth in transition programs

National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth. 2009. Helping youth with mental health needs avoid transition cliffs: Lessons from pioneering transition programs. Washington, DC: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth, 10 pp. (InfoBrief; issue 24)

Annotation: This brief discusses the challenges faced by youth and young adults with mental health needs during their transition to adulthood and describes strategies used by youth service professionals to avoid age-related transition barriers and to prevent service interruptions during this critical stage of development. Included are detailed guidelines to help professionals achieve success for youth with mental health needs in the following general areas of (1) school-based preparation; (2) career preparation and work-based learning experiences; (3) youth development and leadership; (4) connecting activities: (5) and family involvement and support. The brief is based on previous research about transition-age youth with mental health needs published in early reports, including two produced by the National Collaborative on Workforce & Disability for Youth (NCWD/Youth).

Contact: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth, c/o Institute for Educational Leadership, 4455 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Stuie 310, Washington, DC 20008, Telephone: (877) 871-0744 Secondary Telephone: (877) 871-0665 Web Site: http://www.ncwd-youth.info Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with developmental disabilities, Guidelines, Mental health, Mental health programs, Resources for professionals, Young adults, Youth development, Youth in transition programs

Fluet C, Freeman L, Porter S. 2008. Transition planning curriculum. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Consortium for Children with Special Health Care Needs, 51 pp.

Annotation: This guide presents a training curriculum developed through needs assessment, pilot testing, and post implementation evaluation to raise expectations about what youth with special health care needs can achieve, build specific transition-to-adulthood related resources among participants, increase participants' knowledge about transition related resources, and promote a collaborative approach among community service providers who work with youth and families during transition. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: New England SERVE, 101 Tremont Street, Suite 812, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 574-9493 Fax: (617) 574-9608 Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children with special health care needs, Curricula, Professional training, Transition planning, Youth, Youth in transition programs

National League of Cities, Council on Youth, Education, and Families. [2005]. A city platform for strengthening families and improving outcomes for children and youth. Washington, DC: Council on Youth, Education, and Families, National League of Cities, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for mayors and city councilmembers provides an agenda for municipal action and leadership on behalf of children, youth, and their families. The document discusses the costs of inaction, four essential tasks for sustained progress, and key action steps to consider. Topics for action steps include early childhood development, youth development, education and afterschool, health and safety, youth in transition, family economic success, and neighborhoods and the community.

Contact: National League of Cities, 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 550, Washington, DC 20004-1763, Telephone: (877) 827-2385 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.nlc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Aftercare, Child health, Communities, Early childhood development, Families, Health, Local programs, Public policies, Safety, Youth in transition programs

Koyanagi C, Stine L, Alfano E, Lind E. 2005. Moving On: Analysis of federal programs funding services to assist transition-age youth with serious mental health conditions. Washington, DC: Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, 34 pp.

Annotation: This report is an analysis of 57 federal programs offering resources to assist adolescents and young adults with serious mental disorders in making the transition from childhood -- and often from foster care --to independence. The report provides an overview of federal programs, a list of programs by domain, a list of policy issues to address, and a list of programs, by category. A short summary of the potential of each program reviewed is included. A conclusion and endnotes are included, as well.

Contact: Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, 1101 15th Street, N.W., Suite 1212, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 467-5730 Secondary Telephone: (202) 467-4232 Fax: (202) 223-0409 E-mail: communications@bazelon.org Web Site: http://www.bazelon.org $6.50, plus shipping and handling; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Federal programs, Foster care, Mental disorders, Public policy, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Young adults, Youth in transition programs

Wall T, Gilmer D. 2004. Maine Works for Youth! [Progress report]. Augusta, ME: Maine Works for Youth, 5 pp.

Annotation: This progress report described accomplishments of a project titled Maine Works for Youth, Maine's Healthy and Ready to Work phase II project. The program focuses on adolescents and young adults with special health care needs.The report is a bullet list of project accomplishments during the past 2 years. The project is a follow-up to the phase I project, Maine Adolescent Transition Partnership. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maine Department of Health and Human Services, Children with Special Health Care Needs Program, 11 State House Station, Key Bank Plaza, 286 Water Street, Seventh Floor, Augusta, ME 04333, Telephone: (207) 287-5139 Secondary Telephone: (800) 698-3624 ext. 5139 Fax: (207) 287-5355 Web Site: http://www.maine.gov/dhhs/boh/cshn/

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Adolescents with special health care needs, Employment programs, Maine: Transition to independent living, Reports, State programs, Transition planning, Young adults, Youth in transition programs

Yohale N, Pittman K. 2001. Powerful pathways: Framing options and opportunities for vulnerable youth. Gaithersburg, MD: Youth Development and Research Fund; Takoma Park, MD: Forum for for Youth Investment, 48 pp. (A discussion paper of the Youth Transition Funders Group)

Annotation: This paper outlines what is known about providing consistent and comprehensive support to vulnerable youth through education, foster care, social services, juvenile justice, welfare, and workforce preparation as they transition to adult life. Topics include describing the vulnerable youth population, racial and socio-economic factors, the importance of the role of education, aligning systems to ensure education and career development, innovations at the policy level, changing perceptions, and building public will. Section topics include the following: (1) vulnerable futures, (2) the imperatives: development, transition, transformation, (3) promising strategies, and (4) recommendations for the work ahead. References conclude the paper.

Contact: Forum for Youth Investment, 7064 Eastern Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20012, Telephone: (202) 207-3333 Fax: (202) 207-3329 E-mail: youth@forumfyi.org Web Site: http://www.forumfyi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Education, Foster care, Foster children, High risk adolescents, Incarcerated youth, Out of school youth, Political processes, School to work transition, Social work, Transitions, Vulnerability, Workplace, Youth in transition programs, Youth services

DeWoody M, Ceja K, Sylvester M. 1993. Independent living services for youths in out-of-home care. Washington, DC: Child Welfare League of America, 53 pp.

Annotation: This book reviews the needs of youths in out of home care who are making the transition to independent living. It also assesses the federal Independent Living Program, the resources the program has brought to the child welfare field, the projects it has supported, and the gaps that continue to exist. It also reports on a 1992 survey of youth-serving agencies conducted by the Child Welfare League of America.

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org Available in libraries. Document Number: No. 5820.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child welfare, Federal programs, Foster care, Independent living centers, Out of home care, Residential care, Transition to independent living, Youth services

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.